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Diabetes Awareness

Diabetes Awareness Month: 12 Ways To Get Involved Together

Diabetes Awareness Month: 12 Ways To Get Involved Together

November is Diabetes Awareness Month, a time to shine the spotlight on diabetes and diabetes research. Ready to get involved? Here are some noteworthy events happening across the country along with suggestions for creative ways you and your family can raise awareness about diabetes in your community. Observe JDRF’s T1Day What better way to kick off the month? The JDRF-sponsored T1Day, held each year on November 1, is an opportunity to get people everywhere more engaged in talking about type 1 diabetes. Suggested T1Day activities include visiting your child’s class for a kid-friendly diabetes Q&A, encouraging your child to write to the local paper about type 1 awareness, and sharing some of your story via social media. Even something as simple as a tweet describing how diabetes has affected your family’s life can be a rich conversation starter. Tag your message with #T1Day to connect with others in the diabetes community. Ryan Reed was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17, just as his racing career was taking off. At diagnosis, he was told he’d never race again. Now, at age 22, Ryan is driving for Roush Fenway Racing in the No. 16 Lilly Diabetes/American Diabetes Association Ford Mustang in the NASCAR® Xfinity® Series. Stop by or tune in for races on November 7 (Texas Motor Speedway), November 14 (Phoenix International Speedway), and November 21 (Homestead-Miami Speedway). November 14 is World Diabetes Day, an annual observance marked all across the globe. The “Go Blue” campaign encourages supporters to do just that for the occasion: Dress your family in blue and go blue at home by putting a blue bulb in your porch light or lighting a blue candle. Let it shine! Diabetes Social Media Advocacy founder Cherise Shockley encourages you to wear blue on all fo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Older adults are disproportionately affected by diabetes, with 25.2% of Americans age 65+ experiencing the disease, compared to 9.4% of the general population (data from the American Diabetes Association) . The Administration for Community Living (ACL) supports the implementation of evidence-based disease prevention and health promotion programs across the country, including the Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP) . This proven program highlights critical information such as techniques to deal with diabetes symptoms, appropriate exercise for improving strength and endurance, healthy eating, appropriate medication use, and working more effectively with health care providers. Additionally, the ACL-funded National Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Resource Center provides a number of resources for supporting effective interventions like DSMP via Medicares Diabetes Self-Management Training benefit. To learn more, visit the Resource Centers website and click on Diabetes Self-Management Training in the Make It Happen section. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness: By The Numbers

Diabetes Awareness: By The Numbers

Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition that has now reached near-epidemic levels. With these facts, you can help spread diabetes awareness. As organizations like the American Diabetes Association work to spead diabetes awareness, health experts are hoping to put a renewed effort into fighting the diabetes epidemic. Type 2 diabetes is a serious health condition that not only affects your lifestyle, but can put you at risk for many other health issues, including high blood pressure, stroke, and nerve damage. Many Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes, and the diabetes population continues to grow around the world. “Diabetes and its twin calamity, obesity, is a problem not only in this country. It is a global problem, surpassing malnutrition,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. If you look at the growing number of people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, it’s easy to see why health experts are saying we have a diabetes epidemic. Here’s a look at the numbers: An estimated 366 million people around the world have diabetes, or about 5.2 percent of the global population. There are 4.6 million diabetes-related deaths each year. About 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, or about 8.3 percent of the population. About 95 percent of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. In adults 20 years and older, nearly 2 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in 2010. Those cases are part of the more than 8 percent of Americans with diabetes, but the American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that by 2050 more than 30 percent of American adults could have diabetes. A big concern with diabetes is that many people are unaware that they have the condition. An estimated 7 million people have Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. We’ll kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to “Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid” and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom “T1D Looks Like Me” profile photo for social media or generate your unique “T1D Footprint.” You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness: What Does It Really Mean?

Diabetes Awareness: What Does It Really Mean?

Diabetes Awareness: What Does It Really Mean? November is Diabetes Awareness Month, but what does this mean to most people in America. Many are aware of the disease and plenty probably even know someone living with diabetes. The sad truth is that since its something so many people have heard about, its also something that far too many could care less about that is unless they are diagnosed with the diabetes themselves some day. The true purpose of Diabetes Awareness Month is to get the average American to start actually caring about the disease and those who are fighting it. Its only with a massive effort can we hope to stop diabetes in the future. Frankly, its something thats well worth your consideration, because type 2 diabetes can affect anyone at any age. Most diagnosed cases are either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. So what makes these two conditions different? Type 1 diabetes (used to be called juvenile diabetes) is actually an autoimmune disease. What this means is that the immune system creates autoantibodies which attack the beta cells of the pancreas. Once these are destroyed, the body cant produce its own insulin. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is the result of lifestyle choices. Technology has done a lot of things to make our lives easier, but that also means that many people have become increasingly sedentary. Poor overall diet, lack of quality sleep and not getting enough exercise can all play significant roles in the development of type 2 diabetes. As it stands, about 90 percent of all casesdiagnosed aretype 2 diabetes. The difference between the two becomes more clear when we look at the hormone insulin. When food is consumed, sugar levels rise in the bloodstream. The insulin promotes the extraction of glucose (sugar) from the blood to fat cells, musc Continue reading >>

Why We Need Diabetes Awareness Month... More Than Ever

Why We Need Diabetes Awareness Month... More Than Ever

Hello again, Diabetes Awareness Month. Yup, November marks another national awareness month -- aimed at those in America who are pancreatically-challenged or rapidly heading in that direction. And on Nov. 14, we'll once again mark international World Diabetes Day honoring the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting, who would be 126 if he were still alive today. As always during this time of year, we've been inundated with marketing pitches from organizations big and small. And as always around this time of year, many in our community ponder the perennial question: Does it all matter? Really? Admittedly last year, we published a piece questioning the effectiveness of NDAM (shorthand for National Diabetes Awareness Month). But our country is in a different place this year, is it not? And now, we're setting skepticism aside to argue that November's designation as Diabetes Awareness Month truly does matter -- potentially more than ever right now. Here's why... It's Only Getting Worse Diabetes is becoming more and more prevalent, especially among children and teens. And that's both type 1 and type 2. And yet our government is cutting funding for diabetes at an alarming rate. This disconnect illustrates that our legislators and the public at large just don't know or care enough about this illness... despite the fact that they're all at risk too. Meanwhile, drug pricing has gotten so out of hand that people are literally dying because they can't afford their insulin. Middle class people. Working people. Young people. How can this be happening in a country as wealthy and sophisticated as ours?! So yes, the notion of "raising awareness" sounds a lot less vague these days. SOMETHING'S GOTTA CHANGE, and promoting a month-long blitz of awareness messages has got to Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month! World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated globally on November 14 to raise awareness about both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Join us in celebrating this incredible community all month long — and especially on WDD. Explore the different ways to get involved: by inspiring others, educating peers, knowing your history and giving back. Once-a-day advocacy actions to help us make some noise for National Diabetes Awareness month in November! Tag @beyondtype1 on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook so we can re-share. Use #NDAM #DiabetesAwarenessMonth to join the conversation. Educate A big part of spreading awareness is educating others about what Type 1 diabetes is and isn’t. Education is key to dispelling ignorance around the chronic illness and continuing advocacy for those living with it. You can give a presentation to your school or classroom and we’ll ship you materials. Just sign up and we’ll help you get started! Download the poster: “What is Type 1 Diabetes?” Download the poster: “Warning Signs of Type 1 Diabetes” Check out our cool and shareable fact cards HERE! Get inspired this month by sharing the encouragements of others. Check out our new quote board on Pinterest and start spreading the support by leveraging your social media channels. Type 1 diabetes presents daily challenges that T1Ds and those who love them must learn to navigate. Hopefulness and positivity make those dark days a little easier. Pay homage to the history of diabetes and the progress of technology that eases T1D management. We’ve come a long way since the creation of insulin and are recently celebrating the FDA approval of an “artificial pancreas”. This is a look at where we’ve come from and where we are going in the near future. Celebrate Di Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

Prevention Through Awareness Raising Global Awareness Of Diabetes And Its Complications

Prevention Through Awareness Raising Global Awareness Of Diabetes And Its Complications

Prevention through Awareness Raising Global Awareness of Diabetes and Its Complications European Endocrinology, 2006(2):24-8; DOI: Citation European Endocrinology, 2006(2):24-8; DOI: The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recently concluded its World Diabetes Day campaign. This year-long awareness campaign, run by the IDF with the support of the World Health Organization (WHO), aims at informing the public of the causes, symptoms, complications and treatments associated with the condition. The year reaches its zenith on the World Diabetes Day itself, 14 November, when stakeholders from the global diabetes community join in what is both a celebration of the lives of people with diabetes and the worlds largest diabetes awareness-raising event. In 2005, there has been a focus on diabetes and foot care. The IDF has received significant help from its Consultative Section on the Diabetic Foot and the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot both of which are chaired by Karel Bakker. The aim of the campaign has been to convey and promote the message that it is possible to reduce amputation rates through prevention, aggressive management of existing diabetes and the provision of appropriate education for people with diabetes and healthcare professionals. World Diabetes Day serves as an important reminder of the increasing global incidence and prevalence of diabetes and the significant human, social and economic costs that this brings. It is crucial to alert the public worldwide to the fact that diabetes is a serious condition that is currently underestimated in terms of its frequency, cost and impact on quality of life. Each year, more than three million deaths worldwide are attributable to diabetes-related causes. The IDF estimates that approximately 194 mill Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetes Awareness Month Mean To You?

What Does Diabetes Awareness Month Mean To You?

November is Diabetes Awareness Month; in case you didn’t know. When November rolls around, it’s a time of advocacy for those in an advocacy role in the diabetic community. Being an advocate, we advocate all year long, but November is one month, solely dedicated to the lives we live every single day. It’s a chance to get the information on Diabetes awareness out there to the masses, to give it the spotlight it deserves. For some, Diabetes Awareness Month means a world of different things than it does for others. Like diabetes, everyone’s awareness month is different. I asked those in the Diabetes Online Community at the beginning of the month, what Diabetes Awareness Month means to them, and these were their responses. Joy Marie Kolakauskas: That we are stronger than we think. Reaching out and helping is a wonderful thing, we are not alone and this disease sucks. Oh and…. When will I get to sleep? Amanda Jill: Educating others about this condition (I refuse to use the term disease). Everyone thinks that if you eat candy you will get it but it is more about lifestyle choices. Jeff Sandoval: To me it means that I hope they find a cure and that no one else will ever have to go through the trials and tribulations that I have had to endure. Or that anyone else with this disease, it is definitely a blind disease and no one can see physically, but boy are you sure judged once they hear you have it. It is probably without a doubt the most misunderstood disease in the world. Karissa Albert LaBrash: I’m all about education and educating those that are unware of what diabetes really is about. Angie Allen Davis: We are holding 2-hour mini focus groups and giving away prizes for trivia questions at work in the café. I feel like I am making a difference in awareness in my Continue reading >>

How To Do The Blue During Diabetes Awareness Month

How To Do The Blue During Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month, a time to shine the spotlight on diabetes and diabetes research. Ready to get involved? Here are some noteworthy events happening across the country along with suggestions for creative ways you and your family can raise awareness about diabetes in your community. Observe JDRF’s T1Day What better way to kick off the month? The JDRF-sponsored T1Day, held each year on November 1, is an opportunity to get people everywhere more engaged in talking about type 1 diabetes. Suggested T1Day activities include visiting your child’s class for a kid-friendly diabetes Q&A, encouraging your child to write to the local paper about type 1 awareness, and sharing some of your story via social media. Even something as simple as a tweet describing how diabetes has affected your family’s life can be a rich conversation starter. Tag social media posts with #T1Day to connect with others in the diabetes community. Cheer on NASCAR® Driver Ryan Reed Ryan Reed was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17, just as his racing career was taking off. At diagnosis, he was told he’d never race again. Now, at age 23, Ryan is driving for Roush Fenway Racing in the No. 16 Lilly Diabetes/American Diabetes Association Ford Mustang in the NASCAR Xfinity® Series. Stop by or tune in for races on November 5 (Texas Motor Speedway), November 12 (Phoenix International Speedway), and November 19 (Homestead-Miami Speedway). “Go Blue” for World Diabetes Day November 14 is World Diabetes Day, an annual observance marked all across the globe. The “Go Blue” campaign encourages supporters to do just that for the occasion: Dress your family in blue and go blue at home by putting a blue bulb in your porch light or lighting a blue candle. Let it shine! Keep Your Eyes on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month: When Is It And What Happens?

Diabetes Awareness Month: When Is It And What Happens?

Diabetes Awareness Month: When is it and what happens? Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C Every November, people with diabetes, health care professionals, and patient organizations across the United States take part in National Diabetes Month. The event is to raise awareness of diabetes, and the impact it has on millions of Americans. National Diabetes Month is important as more than 29 million Americans have diabetes , yet 1 in 4 of these people are unaware that they have the condition. What is the theme for National Diabetes Month 2017? In 2017, the theme for National Diabetes Month is Managing Diabetes - It's Not Easy, But It's Worth It . The theme for 2017 serves to remind people with diabetes that although managing the condition is difficult, they're not alone. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) explain that 2017's theme highlights the importance of managing diabetes to prevent diabetes-related health problems. For example, people with diabetes are twice as likely to have a stroke or get heart disease compared with people who do not have diabetes. They are also more likely to develop these conditions at an earlier age than people without diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk of kidney problems because high blood sugar levels can damage the kidneys over time. This damage can occur long before a person starts to experience any obvious symptoms. Diabetes can cause damage to the nerves and blood vessels, leading to serious, difficult-to-treat infections, particularly in the feet. In some cases, amputation may be needed to stop the infection spreading to other parts of the body. Damage that diabetes causes to blood vessels in the retina can also lead to vision problems and even blindness. The NIDDK say that Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

The biggest month for diabetes awareness activities is only a few days away, and it’s the perfect time to raise your voice to increase awareness about diabetes! You might ask: Why? How does more awareness meaningfully impact the lives of people with diabetes? The question is a good one, but the answer is simple. Awareness is the first step to any kind of change. More funding for research, better public support for legislation issues. More understanding and empathy. Less blame and shame. Awareness + education is even more powerful. Knowing symptoms of type 1 can be life-saving when a diagnosis is right around the corner. If you’re at risk for type 2, education can help prevent or delay the progression of the disease (in cases where you’re able to do that). And education that helps our communities offer support (instead of blame) through a very challenging disease is invaluable. Here’s a list of different ways you and your family and friends can make an impact for diabetes in your community. 1. Make Social Noise with JDRF’s Thunderclap Campaign Once again JDRF kicks off National Diabetes Awareness Month on November 1st with type 1 diabetes awareness day, “T1D”, a day devoted to raising the voices of people touched by type 1 diabetes. Use the web platform “Thunderclap” to join in an auto-generated, mass-shared social media post All you have to do is sign-up on the JDRF #noT1D Thunderclap page. Show your friends, family, and the public you can live well with this disease and chase your dreams – whether that’s running marathons, travelling the world, falling in love, or advocating for a cause. The Instagram contest will ask you to show a photo of how you’re doing just that along with a few sentences on what it’s like to live with diabetes. Look for Continue reading >>

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