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Diabetes At The Age Of 30

Diabetes In Men

Diabetes In Men

The rates of diabetes have dramatically increased in all states. Twenty-six million children and adults in the United States -- 8% of the population -- have diabetes. The risk for type 2 diabetes typically increases with age. In the absence of risks, testing should begin after age 45. One of the biggest jumps in type 2 diabetes was among men. The risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: a sedentary lifestyle a diet high in sugar and refined carbohydrates and low in fiber and whole grains a history of type 2 diabetes in your immediate family (mother, father, sister, or brother) African-Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Native Alaskans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders also have an increased risk. Having diabetes, in turn, increases the danger of heart disease, as well as a range of problems associated with impaired circulation, such as eye disease and nerve damage. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the body can't control blood glucose levels properly. Normally, the digestive tract breaks down food into glucose, a form of sugar. After being absorbed, it is released into the blood. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, stimulates cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream and use it for energy. Type 1 diabetes, which typically shows up in childhood, is caused when the immune system mistakenly attacks insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes occurs when tissues in the body gradually become resistant to the effect of insulin. The pancreas responds by churning out more of the hormone. But eventually it can't keep up, and blood sugar levels begin to climb. That's bad for many reasons. High glucose levels damage nerve and blood vessels, leading to heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, and gum infections. Advanced type 2 d Continue reading >>

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 21 million people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The CDC also notes that 90 to 95 percent of cases in adults involve type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 2 diabetes was most prevalent in older adults. But due to widespread poor lifestyle habits, it’s more common in younger people than ever before. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. Learn what you can do to prevent or delay its onset, no matter your age. Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, there were a total of 1.7 million new total diabetes cases in 2012. In 2012, adults aged 45 to 64 were the most diagnosed age group for diabetes. New cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people aged 20 years and older were distributed as follows: ages 20 to 44: 371,000 new cases ages 45 to 64: 892,000 new cases age 65 and older: 400,000 new cases People aged 45 to 64 were also developing diabetes at a faster rate, edging out adults aged 65 and older. Type 2 diabetes used to be only prevalent in adults. It was once called “adult-onset” diabetes. Now, because it is becoming more common in children, it’s simply called “type 2" diabetes. While type 1 diabetes, which is believed to be due to an autoimmune reaction, is more common in children and young adults, type 2 diabetes is rising in incidence, attributed in part to poor lifestyle habits. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 5,090 people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care considered the potential future number of diabetes cases in people under the age of 20. The study found that, at current rates, the number of people under the age o Continue reading >>

Diabetics Age 20-30

Diabetics Age 20-30

Just wondering if there are any people who have been diagnosed with type 2 in their 20's I hear type 2 is more common in over 40 yr olds. I have no history of diabetes (not that I know of) and i am an active person. I work 2 jobs and am always busy. I'd like to hear some of your stories or advice. any comments, greatly appreciated. I was Dx'd at age 35 march 4th 2006. I dont have anyone my family with Diabetes. Im assuming from what my Dr said that I got it from being over weight. I dont really have a story as I'm still new but, I diet, watch carbs and walk 2 miles a day which I have lost 19 pds in 5 weeks and brought my A1c form 11.0 to 7.9. I was never really active unless unless you call getting up for another coke "Active" lol but now that I have Diabetes Iam feeling 100% better about the way I feel, look and eat. I look at being a T2 as a diet for life. which isnt bad because everyone should be eating healthy and exercising. I get mad sometimes when everyone around me is eating a big banana split and im sitting there with my water but I just think how good ive been on my diet and and how good my results are going to be.It's truly not the end of the world as I once thought. I was diagnosed last year at 37. I am VERY active, competitive athlete but I do have diabetes in my family and overtaxing my body over the years just sped up the process and I ended up gaining 40lbs before being diagnosed. I am struggling to lose weight by exercise every day, watching what and how I eat. Friend T2 since March 06. Insulin resistant l was just curious, read somewhere on this board that it helps to reduce weight problems? Think it was one of Glodees post's? Have you lost much since being diagnosed? l used to be like you, found it extrememly hard to lose any weight that l gained dur Continue reading >>

Can We Get Diabetes At The Age Of 23?

Can We Get Diabetes At The Age Of 23?

Yes Sir. It is possible to develop diabetes in your 20’s. However its quite challenging nowadays to determine the type of diabetes an individual has. Three major categories of Diabetes have been observed so far- Adult onset diabetes (Type 2 diabetes or NIDDM) which is the most common form that affects 90% of the diabetic population. However this is also seen in obese pre-teens. Early-onset diabetes (Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or IDDM)observed in a much younger population and diagnosed mostly in the teens. Gestational diabetes which develops in pregnant women. The type of diabetes that we are talking here is called early -onset or type-1 diabetes. In younger individuals, we refer to it as Juvenile diabetes.This is something what we call an auto-immune disorder wherein your immune system mistakenly sees the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas as foreign, and destroys them. The exact mechanism of how this condition is developed has not been completely elucidated, but its known that certain viral infections can trigger it. When your body develops this form of diabetes the arrival of its characteristic symptoms seems quite sudden which is in contrast to the type-2 diabetes whose symptoms take much longer time to express. The condition manifests as symptoms that include weight loss despite eating more, constant thirst and urination, and nausea, low blood pressure and low body temperature. If not treated for this disorder it can lead to severely debilitating conditions of the heart and blood vessels, kidneys, nervous system, eyes, mouth, hands and feet. There is no complete cure for diabetes especially the type-1 form as of now. Keeping a regular check on your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol,embracing an active lifestyle and proper food habits should Continue reading >>

Diagnosis: Type 2 Diabetes. Age: 24.

Diagnosis: Type 2 Diabetes. Age: 24.

A few days after Christmas 2008, Mike Durbin of Fort Wayne, Ind., got an unwanted holiday surprise: a double diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure. His blood glucose was well above normal, and his heart was functioning at only 30 to 35 percent of its capacity. “That scared the hell out of me,” he says. His diabetes diagnosis, however, was not a complete shock. His grandmother has type 2 diabetes, and his great-grandparents had the condition as well. He also had a number of risk factors, including excess weight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides. Yet he had one advantage — his age. He was only 24. It might seem surprising that someone so young could develop type 2 diabetes, but the disease is on the rise among the under-30 set. In fact, 5.7 percent of all new cases of diabetes occur in people between 18 and 29, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. Another 3.5 percent of diagnoses happen before patients’ 35th birthdays. In Durbin’s case, he was sent to the doctor with a diabetes symptom that just wouldn’t quit — a yeast infection. “As I’ve learned, yeast infections are common among people living with the various types of diabetes,” Durbin says. “The infection led me to the doctor. Tests were done, and I was diagnosed with type 2. Other tests done at that time revealed that I had congestive heart failure as well. In hindsight, I realized I had a lot of the typical symptoms also — increased thirst, dry mouth, frequent urination, fatigue, blurred vision, and headaches.” Creating a Diabetes Management Plan Durbin has made important lifestyle changes now that he’s living with type 2 diabetes. For starters, he checks his blood glucose at least four times a day: when he wakes up, befo Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Adults Aged 30–49 Years

Incidence Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Adults Aged 30–49 Years

The population-based registry in the province of Turin, Italy Abstract OBJECTIVE—Incidence of type 1 diabetes is considered to be low in adults, but no study has been performed in Mediterranean countries. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We extended the study base of the registry of the province of Turin, Italy, to subjects aged 30–49 years in the period 1999–2001 to estimate the incidences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was based on permanent insulin treatment or a fasting C-peptide level ≤0.20 nmol/l or islet cell (ICA) or GAD (GADA) antibody positivities. RESULTS—We identified 1,135 case subjects with high completeness of ascertainment (99%), giving an incidence rate of 58.0 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 54.7–61.5). The incidence of type 1 diabetes was 7.3 per 100,000 person-years (6.2–8.6), comparable with the rates in subjects aged 0–14 and 15–29 years (10.3 [9.5–11.2] and 6.8 [6.3–7.4]). Male subjects had a higher risk than female subjects for both type 1 (rate ratio [RR] 1.70 [95% CI 1.21–2.38]) and type 2 (2.10 [1.84–2.40]) diabetes. ICA and/or GADA positivities were found in 16% of the cohort. In logistic regression, variables independently associated with autoimmune diabetes were age 30–39 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.39 [95% CI 1.40–4.07]), fasting C-peptide <0.60 nmol/l (3.09 [1.74–5.5]), and BMI <26 kg/m2 (2.17 [1.22–3.85]). CONCLUSIONS—Risk of type 1 diabetes between age 30 and 49 years is similar to that found in the same area between age 15 and 29 years. Further studies are required to allow geographical comparisons of risks of both childhood and adulthood autoimmune diabetes, the latter being probably higher than previously believed. Epidemiological studies (1–7) have provided evidence that Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes. The variations between individual diagnoses are too great for there to be an exact age of onset for type 2 diabetes. There is evidence, however, that the likelihood of developing the condition increases drastically after the age of 45. Average age of onset for type 2 diabetes The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend annual diabetes screening tests after the age of 45. But the age at which someone develops the condition depends on too many differing factors to accurately predict. A wide mix of individual health and lifestyle factors can influence the progression of the condition. Many people have diabetes for years before being diagnosed, causing a large variation between the age of onset and age of diagnosis. Meanwhile, some estimates claim that nearly one-third of those with diabetes do not know they have it, which further complicates estimates. And many national surveys and studies do not distinguish between rates of type 1 and 2 diabetes in adults. According to the CDC, from 1997 through to 2011, the average age at which a person was diagnosed with diabetes in the United States was largely the same, at around 54 years of age. While there might not be a set age for onset for type 2 diabetes, age greatly increases the chances of developing the condition. In 2014, an estimated 4.3 percent of Americans over 20 years of age had diabetes, while 13.4 percent of those aged 45-64, and 11.2 percent of those aged 65 or older, had the condition. A 2016 study found that the rates of type 2 diabetes were up to seven times higher in Chinese adults, aged 55-74, than they were in those aged 20-34 years. The ADA report that rates of diabetes remain high i Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms

Early Detection It is important to know the signs and symptoms of diabetes to detect the disease early and get it under control before any irreversible damage is done to the body. Recent studies indicate that early detection and treatment of diabetes can decrease the chance of developing complications from the disease. Diabetes has often been referred to as a "silent disease" for two reasons: 1) Many people with Type 2 diabetes walk around with symptoms for many years, but are not diagnosed until they develop a complication of the disease, such as blindness, kidney disease, or heart disease; 2) There are no specific physical manifestations in individuals with diabetes. Therefore, unless a person chooses to disclose their disease, it is possible that friends and even family members may be unaware of a person's diagnosis. Diabetes is detected through a blood glucose test, and experts recommend that Americans over age 35 with a family history of diabetes or other risk factors (such as being overweight) should consider asking their physicians for a blood test annually. The earlier diabetes is detected, the earlier complications may be treated and/or prevented. Common signs/symptoms (for Type 1, Type 2, Type 1.5, Pre-diabetes, Gestational Diabetes) Unexplained weight loss is one of the common type 1 diabetes symptoms in women. With this type of diabetes, the body is unable to use all the calories that the food provides, even though the person follows a healthy diet. Due to this, the person loses weight, even without trying to do so. Another symptom that is seen in both types of diabetes is the feeling the need to visit the washroom frequently. The body tries to get rid of the excess sugar through the urine and hence, one feels the need to urinate within very short periods of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Strikes Adults In 30s

Diabetes Strikes Adults In 30s

AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON –– Is age 30 too young to get a diabetes test? Unfortunately for millions of young Americans who may not realize they are at risk, it is not. New health guidelines reflect an increasingly dismal reality: Cases of the most common form of diabetes, once only a bane of aging, are up 70 percent among 30-somethings in the past decade. Because the disease can quietly fester for years, half of Type 2 diabetics have suffered serious damage to their eyes, kidneys, nerves and arteries by the time they learn they are sick. So if you have always heard that you do not need to be checked for diabetes until age 45, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists – doctors who specialize in diabetes care – wants you to think again. People with any one of the following diabetes risks should get tested at age 30, according to the group's new guidelines: –Having a diabetic relative. –Being overweight. –Being black, Hispanic, Asian, American Indian or a Pacific Islander, populations with two to three times the risk of diabetes as whites. –Having heart disease, high blood pressure, high triglycerides or low HDL, the "good" cholesterol. –Women who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy or delivered a baby weighing more than 9 pounds. –Women with a hormonal disorder called polycystic ovarian syndrome. –Having a previous blood sugar test that found impaired glucose tolerance, a condition that leads to diabetes. Why check so early? Catch the illness sooner and patients may control their blood sugar enough to stay healthier longer, explains association president Dr. Rhoda Cobin of New York's Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The American Diabetes Association long has urged that everyone be considered for a diabetes test at age 45 and that Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What You Need To Know As You Age

Diabetes: What You Need To Know As You Age

Overview Diabetes is a problem that has many consequences: If you have the disease, your body can no longer keep its blood sugar at a healthy level. But over time, the effects of diabetes can become much more complicated. The disease can lead to serious, even life-threatening problems from your head to your toes. Too much blood sugar (also called glucose) can damage the blood vessels and nerves that run throughout your body. This can set the stage for many other medical conditions: stroke heart disease kidney disease vision problems and blindness damage to the feet or legs However, there is good news for the 26 million Americans with diabetes—and those at risk. Experts are learning more all the time about lifestyle steps for diabetes control and prevention. New medications and devices can also help you keep control over your blood sugar and prevent complications, says Johns Hopkins expert Rita Kalyani, M.D. Definitions A1C Test: A blood test used to diagnose and monitor diabetes. By measuring how much glucose (also called blood sugar) is attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in your red blood cells, this test gives you and your health-care provider a picture of your average blood glucose levels over three months. A normal result is below 5.7 percent. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should have this test done twice a year to check if your blood glucose is under control. Blood glucose: Also referred to as blood sugar, the primary energy source for the cells in your body. Blood glucose levels rise after meals and fall the longer you’ve gone without eating. Your blood glucose level is a measure of how much glucose you have in your bloodstream. A normal fasting blood glucose level is between 70 and 100 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter of blood). Insulin (in-suh-lin): A Continue reading >>

Half Of Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Occur After Age 30

Half Of Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Occur After Age 30

Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in people over age 30 as often as in those under age 30. Type 1 diabetes used to be referred to as “juvenile diabetes”. That name was later called inaccurate since anyone of any age can be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Those diagnosed with type 1 as adults are generally referred to as having LADA, or latent autoimmune diabetes. It is still a commonly held belief however, that most diagnosed with type 1 are children. This translates to education and support for children diagnosed with diabetes and their parents but not so much for older patients. According to Medscape, new information taken from genetic data at the UK Biobank shows that just as many people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over age 30 as are diagnosed while under age 30. Should More Support be Available to Patients Diagnosed with Type 1 as Adults? This information may have implications on the way we view type 1 diabetes and the way we go about screening for it and diagnosing it. Clinically, an adult presenting symptoms of diabetes will most likely have type 2 diabetes because statistically there are many more cases of type 2 than type 1 diabetes. Many adults with type 1 diabetes are first misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes and often endure trying times as they discover that the type 2 treatment they’ve been prescribed is dangerously inadequate. Aside from not getting the right treatment, adult patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes often report not getting enough information about their illness and how to manage it successfully. They are left to turn to the internet to search for meaningful type 1 diabetes information. When a child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes they are typically admitted into a hospital for a few days while they and their parents get educated an Continue reading >>

Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too

Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too

David Lazarus had just moved to Los Angeles to start a new job as a business and consumer columnist for the Los Angeles Times when he suddenly developed some of the classic signs of diabetes: extreme thirst, fatigue and weight loss. He dropped close to 15 pounds in two weeks. Lazarus was in his early 40s. "The weight loss was the first big red flag. It happened really fast," he says. He consulted a physician, who diagnosed him with Type 2 diabetes and recommended a "monastic" low-carb, macrobiotic diet. When he continued to feel lousy a few days later, Lazarus spoke with another physician. That doctor suggested that Lazarus might have Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition in which the insulin-making cells in the pancreas are attacked and destroyed. But that physician didn't take insurance. Finally Lazarus made his way to the diabetes center at the University of California, Los Angeles. There, an endocrinologist diagnosed him with Type 1 diabetes and immediately put him on the correct treatment, insulin. Without insulin injections or infusion via a pump, people with Type 1 diabetes typically fall into a coma and die within days to weeks, although sometimes adults may have a small amount of reserve insulin that keeps them going longer. Still, eventually all people with Type 1 diabetes must receive insulin. Lazarus' story is not uncommon. It has long been thought that Type 1 diabetes arises primarily in childhood or adolescence and only rarely in adulthood. In fact, Type 1 diabetes was formerly called "juvenile" diabetes, and that term is still widely used, even though the terminology was officially changed in 1997. Across the ages Now, it looks as if not only can Type 1 diabetes occur in adults, it's just as likely to appear in adulthood as in childhood or adolescence. Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Diabetes: Type 1

Living Longer With Diabetes: Type 1

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you may wonder, “Is this going to kill me? How long can I live with this?” These are scary questions. Fortunately, the answers have gotten better. This article is about living longer with Type 1. Next week will be about Type 2. History of life with Type 1 In Type 1, the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed. Before insulin was discovered and made injectable, Type 1 diabetes usually killed children within months, or even days. The only treatment known to medicine was going on a low-carb, high-fat and -protein diet. People might live a few years that way. According to the website Defeat Diabetes, “In 1897, the average life expectancy for a 10-year-old child with diabetes was about one year. Diagnosis at age 30 carried a life expectancy of about four years. A newly diagnosed 50-year-old might live eight more years.” (Probably, those 50-year-olds really had Type 2.) In the 1920s, insulin was discovered and became available for use. Life expectancy with Type 1 went up dramatically. But when I started nursing in the 1970s, it was still common for people with Type 1 to die before age 50. With better insulins, home testing, and lower-carbohydrate diets, people live longer. A study from the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, found that people with Type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years. This compares to a life expectancy at birth of roughly 76 years for men and 81 years for women in the general population in the U.S. A new study of about 25,000 people with Type 1 in Scotland found that men with Type 1 diabetes lose about 11 years of life expectancy, and women about 13 years compared to those without the disease. According to WebMD, “Heart disease accounted for the most lost Continue reading >>

Symptoms In Women

Symptoms In Women

Diabetes is a common health condition among women all around the world and it is extremely essential to be aware of the diabetes symptoms. Below, you will be given complete information on the causes, symptoms and types of diabetes that affect women. Diabetes in Women Increases Diabetes is essentially a metabolic disorder that occurs as a result of elevated glucose levels in the blood. Although both women and men can be impacted by diabetes, the diabetes rate in women has considerably increased in recent years. Furthermore, studies have indicated that women are at more risk of becoming affected by the causes of diabetes in comparison to men. Therefore, more focus will be placed on being aware of the symptoms in women. Medically, this health condition is referred to as diabetes mellitus. Primarily, diabetes can be categorized into two types; they are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 is also referred to as juvenile diabetes because it is seen commonly in young children, adults and teenagers typically in the age range of 25 to 30 years. This takes place when the pancreas is incapable of producing insulin, which has the responsibility to transport glucose to the cells of the body. When the body fails to produce an adequate amount of insulin; the level of glucose in the blood increases. That increase results in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs in individuals who are middle-aged and older and are afflicted with obesity issues. Type 2 diabetes typically comes about because of poor eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle. In such a case, insulin is produced by the pancreas; however, the body becomes immune to the insulin. It is unable to properly use the insulin, resulting in glucose being present in the blood. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes which occurs in Continue reading >>

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