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Diabetes At Age 22

This Is What It's Like To Be Diagnosed With Diabetes At 20 Years Old

This Is What It's Like To Be Diagnosed With Diabetes At 20 Years Old

Prick my finger. Let test strip draw up blood. Watch the wheels spin on the electronic screen. Hold my breath. Say a little prayer to the man (or woman) upstairs. The readout says 336—a whopping 200 points higher than ideal. I knew I shouldn’t have eaten that half of a bagel two hours ago. But I am only human. Mornings like these are all too common in the life of a young diabetic. I’ll prick myself as many as five to 10 times by the end of the day, hoping to find myself in the blood sugar sweet spot. Juvenile, or type 1, diabetes is viewed as something that only lasts while you live under your parents’ roof, not something that stays with you forever. But it does. It is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone that enables the body to take digested sugar out of the bloodstream and deliver it to cells, which use it for energy. It is much rarer than type 2 diabetes, and usually appears in children and adolescents, though it can sometimes come on in adulthood. Diagnosed at 20 years old, I had more time with a working pancreas than others with type 1. I got to experience a relatively carefree childhood, eating and playing like everyone else. But now, at almost 22, I change my pump and prick my finger as often as, if not more than, my ten-year-old counterparts. I was originally misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes the summer before my sophomore year at Boston University, after a routine blood test showed an elevation in my blood sugar numbers. Over the next few months, as my pancreas gave out its last bits of insulin, my symptoms worsened, and I was finally given the right diagnosis. I spent the better part of my sophomore year learning to ignore an ever-present thirst and the constant feeling of having to pee. I vividly remember Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

For years, distinguishing between the various types of diabetes was pretty straightforward: “Juvenile diabetes,” an autoimmune disease, was diagnosed primarily in children and teenagers when their own body’s immune system destroyed the insulin-producing (beta) cells in their pancreas. “Adult-onset diabetes” occurred in adults and was generally associated with insulin resistance and often with overweight. And “gestational diabetes” occurred in pregnant women and disappeared once the pregnancy was over. In the past 25 years, however, determining what type of diabetes a person has has become more of a challenge. In large part, that’s because more and more children and teenagers are now being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes — the type that occurred predominantly in adults in generations past. Most of these children and teens are overweight. At the same time, it’s becoming clearer that Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age and sometimes occurs in people who are overweight. In addition, another type of diabetes, called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, or LADA, that shares some characteristics with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, has been recognized. Muddying the water further is the realization that diabetic ketoacidosis, an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes that is caused by a lack of insulin, can occur in people with Type 2 diabetes — not just in people with Type 1, as was previously thought. And while gestational diabetes is still diagnosed only in pregnant women, it is sometimes discovered that what is thought to be gestational diabetes is really Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes that happens to start during pregnancy. The incidence of diabetes has increased so greatly around the world in the past 25 years that health organizations and med Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Stephanie Yi, 29, had a body most women would kill for. She never had to work hard to maintain her long-limbed, flat-bellied frame—weekend hikes near her northern California home and lots of spinach salads did the trick. She could easily afford to indulge her sweet tooth with the occasional buttery, sugary snack. At 5'7" and 120 pounds, she had, she figured, hit the good-genes jackpot. But everything changed two years ago, when a crippling fatigue left her sidelined from college classes. Listless, she dragged herself to a doctor, who suspected a thyroid imbalance. A blood test and a few days later, she received the alarming results: Her thyroid was fine; her blood sugar levels were not. She was prediabetic and on the cusp of developing type 2. Stephanie was stunned. Of course, she'd heard diabetes was a health crisis. (At last count, 26 million Americans had the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) But weren't type 2 diabetics fat, sedentary, and on junk-food-and-soda diets? Stephanie hadn't been to a drive-through in ages; she didn't touch meat. Yet, somehow, she'd gotten an illness most slim women dodge. A Growing Threat The CDC estimates that one in nine adults has diabetes and, if current trends continue, one in three will be diabetic by the year 2050. For decades, typical type 2 patients were close to what Stephanie pictured: heavy and inactive. They were also older, often receiving a diagnosis in middle age or beyond. But while such type 2 cases continue to skyrocket, there has been a disturbing increase in a much younger set. The number of diabetes-related hospitalizations among people in their thirties has doubled in the past decade, with women 1.3 times more likely to be admitted than men. Perhaps even more troubling is the e Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Young Adulthood

Type 1 Diabetes In Young Adulthood

1. INTRODUCTION Current estimates suggest that up to 3 million youth and adults in the United States are living with type 1 diabetes. Although primarily thought of as a disease of childhood, adults represent 85% of the total population with type 1 diabetes [1]. The vast majority of research addresses the needs of youth and has failed to focus on or follow youth into adulthood. As this review will highlight, management of type 1 diabetes in young adulthood brings a unique set of challenges and considerations that require further study. Young adulthood represents a critical period of risk for those with type 1 diabetes. Only 17% of early young adults (ages 18–25) and 30% of late young adults (ages 26–30) with type 1 diabetes meet current recommendations for glycemic control (i.e. HbA1c ≤7.0%) [2]. Longitudinal studies suggest that up to 50% of young adults with type 1 diabetes develop diabetes-related complications in their 20s [3], including retinopathy, neuropathy, and hypertension. Young adults with type 1 diabetes are also at disproportionate risk for overweight or obesity, which poses additional health risks [4–6]. Women generally report a higher rate of complications than men [7]. Young adults with type 1 diabetes, particularly those diagnosed in early childhood and with a history of significant hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, are at a slightly increased risk for difficulties with working memory and attention [8]. Risks during this period are magnified by inconsistent engagement with the health care system. Young adults are less likely than any other age group to maintain a usual source of medical care [9]; this problem is likely exacerbated by the need for young adults to transfer from pediatric to adult medical care systems. Relatively high rates of emergen Continue reading >>

"22-year Old With Type 1 Symptoms": Diabetes Community - Support Group

Post my content anonymously (without my username) Put this on my watchlist and alert me by email to new posts With type 1 diabetes one does not produce insulin so one can die within a few days if they do not inject insulin. However, no one can diagnose you here on the internet. You would have to go see a doctor. If you suspect that you may have diabetes, then you need to be seen to get tested. Hi Erin, Having relatives with type 2 I do not think predisposes you to Type 2 ( unless your life habits are similar) and definelty not to type 1. Sounds like you would be a very atypical Type 2 but with symptoms it should be investigated. Type 2 are those who either don't produce enough insulin or have poorly acting insulin but they do make some so their sugar numbers don't go deadly high as can happen to a type 1 in a matter of days or hours. Type 2 get in trouble after years of high sugar damaging their small blood vessels and organs. S, if you are Type 2 find out now to prevent the side affects of unmanaged diabetes. Type 1 is a totally different disease. It is an auto immune disease in which the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens over a short period of time (days) not years. The patient usually presents for diagnosis in an extremely sick condition. Your symptoms are significant and warrant investigation by a good doctor. My experience is not all MDs are created equal. I had the misfortune of going for a physical at a new office (I picked from yellow pages) and had a two minute checkup- fully dressed!! My current doctor takes about 45 minutes for a good history and physcial and orders tests after listening to me. Ask friends, family, co-workers for a referral and ask why they like the office. Some people prefer the 2 minute check u Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetes can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your symptoms at the onset of your disease? I had back pain, kidney infections, yeast infection, night sweats, and insomnia. I thought I had a kidney infection, but a new doctor at the clinic suggested an A1C test and it turned out my blood sugar was in the 200s that morning. Here we are and I have diabetes. I am a young man of 45 years now and I have been confirmed to have diabetes. Now I am having lots of symptom like weak erection, weakness of the body, dry lips and palms, and even restlessness in the legs and shrinking of my general body build ups. My head is itching very much now. I am 62 years old now. Since last 2 months glucose level in early morning is about 135 and after food glucose levels are about 115. Early morning my left leg and hand slightly painful. I had no symptoms, I was hypoglycemic for years, then about age 75 developed type 2 diabetes. I lost about 55 lb., and have controlled it with medication. A1C stays about 6.2, have presently had trouble with kidney infections and high blood pressure. When I got diabetes at 22 I had weight loss, no energy and was thirsty all the time. I also could not eat and was never hungry. I am 35 years old and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last summer. I took generally good care of myself and exercised on a regular basis. For at least the year before, I noticed that I had to urinate all the time, waking me up several times a night. In the month or so prior to being diagnosed, I lost 40 pounds and was thirsty all the time. One day I got extremely sick, could not keep anything down, had blurry vision, a rapid heartbeat, and began hyperventilating. My blood glucose level in the ER was in the high 500s and my A1C was 9.7. Since then, I have de Continue reading >>

Diabetes At The Age Of 22?

Diabetes At The Age Of 22?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Few days ago, i took a checkup program and it shows my blood level is 128. Then the next day, i borrowed a checker from my ant, and i got 129. Then i test again around 3 hrs after breakfast and i got 119. Do i have prediabetes or diabetes 2 already? i heard if i lose weight i can actually control it forever? im still 22, i think my life expentecy will dramatically decreased. im overwight BMI = 31 Your life expectancy hasn't shortened. It has gotten more adventurous, lol. Go to a good endocrinologist, let him order some blood tests and see what you A1C might be. Your readings could be fine, and those numbers could actually be numbers for you. It could also not be your pancreas, but your thyroid. Those numbers are not OK, but you do have age on your side, subject to other health parameters being normal (as makiro says). , I too was diagonised when i was 24 and i completely feel the way how you are feeling now. Dont get panicked , we are there to support you and there are many experts here who will always provide you good advices. Try to indulge in more active healthy life style and by doing that reduce your weight , which might help you in the long run !! Sometimes losing weight will help you manage your bgs but it will not cure your diabetes. Diabetes happens when the endocrine system malfunctions and either stops producing insulin or the insulin that is produced is not recognised readily by our cells. By tweaking your diet, to control the carb level sometimes you can reduce the need for a strong insulin response. Many times diet changes are not enough and then you need meds. Your doctor can r Continue reading >>

Success Story: Diabetic At 22

Success Story: Diabetic At 22

SCOTT MORRISON Hometown: New York, New York Age: 23 Height: 5'11" Weight Before: 320 Pounds Weight After: 218 Pounds Duration: 1 Year “I was 22 years old and [my doctors] told me I had diabetes. They told me I was almost in a coma,” says Scott Morrison of New York City. “My A1C was 13.7. If you’re at 5.7, you’re pre-diabetic. If you’re above 6.2, it means you’re diabetic. You can imagine what a 13.7 was like.” It hadn’t always been this way. A former collegiate wrestler at Rochester Institute of Technology in the 285-pound division, he was large, but not unhealthy. That changed after college. “I wasn’t motivated to work out. I did everything in excess,” recalls Morrison. “I was partying, drinking. I indulged.” His diet didn’t help, either. Morrison would live off of Papa John's and Domino's on the weekend, feasting on whole pizza pies, buffalo wings, cheesy bread and soda throughout the day. During the workweek, he’d hit Applebee’s for their half price appetizers on his lunch break and greasy Philly cheese-steaks at dinnertime. His sedentary office job and poor diet helped him quickly balloon to a portly 320 pounds, and his major health scare with diabetes. SCOTT'S ADVICE Suck it up! “You need the will power, the heart to do it. It’s something that, if it was easy, everyone would be fit. You’ve got to do it on your own.” He met with as many doctors and nutritionists as possible to get his diet, weight and illness under control, and began following a strict, carb reduced diet. “I had a salad or sandwich with lean protein for lunch every day,” he says. “If I ever got hungry for a snack, it would be some mozzarella cheese sticks or an apple.” He’d been working on a contract job, and when that ran up, he enlisted the help Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In The Young

Type 2 Diabetes In The Young

The evolving epidemic The topic of the International Diabetes Federation Consensus conference, held 7–9 February 2003 in Santa Monica, California, was “Type 2 Diabetes in the Young: The Evolving Epidemic” (1). The topic has become a clinical and health economic priority, with important implications for an increasing health care burden throughout the world. Aspects of these conditions have recently been reviewed (1,2). Epidemiology We are in the midst of an epidemic of lack of exercise, of obesity, of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), and of diabetes in young persons. The diabetogenic process begins in fetal life, with low birth weight and poor nutrition combining with sedentary lifestyle and dietary factors to produce an insulin-resistant phenotype that may accelerate the development of renal pathology and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Worldwide, the number of persons with diabetes has tripled since 1985. In Australia, 1.7 and 1.4% of persons aged 35–44 and 45–54 years, respectively, had diabetes in 1981, and these rates increased to 2.5 and 6.2% in 2000 (3), suggesting a trend to earlier age of onset of diabetes. The prevalence rates of obesity (BMI exceeding the 95th percentile) among U.S. children and adolescents aged 6–11 and 12–19 years, respectively, were 4.2 and 4.6% in 1963–1970, 4.0 and 6.1% in 1971–1974, 6.5 and 5.0% in 1976–1980, 11.3 and 10.5% in 1988–1994, and 15.3 and 15.5% in 1999–2000, an alarming rate of increase. Obesity (weight corrected for height >95th percentile) among U.S. children increased between 1988 and 1999 from 7 to 10% among those aged 2–5 years (Fig. 1) (4,5). In a cross-sectional survey of children 9–12 years old in Hong Kong, 38% of girls, but 57% of boys, were overweight, with overweight children of bot Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

Young, Beautiful And Pre-diabetic

Young, Beautiful And Pre-diabetic

Magda van Rooyen, a fit 25-year-old attorney from Durbanville, Cape Town, was diagnosed with glucose intolerance two years ago. This condition, also known as pre-diabetes, occurs when your glucose reading/blood sugar level is above normal, but still below the number that is needed to identify diabetes . It means that although her pancreas still produces insulin, her body doesn't absorb the sugar which then gathers in the blood. Magda has always been a moderately active person with no weight issues, in fact, she did modelling when she was younger. While studying towards her LL.B at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth (formerly known as UPE), Magda developed some alarming symptoms. "I started gaining weight, so I ate less, but I just gained more and more weight," she says. "I was always tired and it felt like I had flu all the time my eyes also felt funny, but being a student I thought I may just be partying too much." She finally went to see a doctor who did a blood glucose test, and at age 22 Magda was diagnosed as being insulin resistant . The impression exists that only overweight people, or those with an unhealthy lifestyle suffer from diabetes. So why did it happen to Magda? It is commonly known that diabetes is passed on through the genes. Magda was prone to diabetes because her grandmother suffered from type 1 diabetes that's when your body stops producing insulin altogether and a person has to inject themselves with insulin. This genetic disposition, combined with some other factors lead to this healthy young woman suffering from insulin resistance. Another contributing factor was Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Once she was informed of the insulin resistance, her doctor also referred her to a gynaecologist who found this condition, co Continue reading >>

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 21 million people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The CDC also notes that 90 to 95 percent of cases in adults involve type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 2 diabetes was most prevalent in older adults. But due to widespread poor lifestyle habits, it’s more common in younger people than ever before. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. Learn what you can do to prevent or delay its onset, no matter your age. Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, there were a total of 1.7 million new total diabetes cases in 2012. In 2012, adults aged 45 to 64 were the most diagnosed age group for diabetes. New cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people aged 20 years and older were distributed as follows: ages 20 to 44: 371,000 new cases ages 45 to 64: 892,000 new cases age 65 and older: 400,000 new cases People aged 45 to 64 were also developing diabetes at a faster rate, edging out adults aged 65 and older. Type 2 diabetes used to be only prevalent in adults. It was once called “adult-onset” diabetes. Now, because it is becoming more common in children, it’s simply called “type 2" diabetes. While type 1 diabetes, which is believed to be due to an autoimmune reaction, is more common in children and young adults, type 2 diabetes is rising in incidence, attributed in part to poor lifestyle habits. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 5,090 people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care considered the potential future number of diabetes cases in people under the age of 20. The study found that, at current rates, the number of people under the age o Continue reading >>

My 22 Year Old Type-1 Son Is In Denial ... Help!

My 22 Year Old Type-1 Son Is In Denial ... Help!

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My 22 year old type-1 son is in denial ... help! My son was diagnosed at age 18 - not a great time to be told to limit alcohol and sugar etc! Since diagnosis he's very rarely had a reading of less than 25; mostly his monitor simply says 'high', indicating that his blood/sugar level is too high for the monitor to read. He's become more and more disillusioned with the whole 'eating sensibly' thing, as it really doesn't seem to make a difference, and is now in the mind-set that diabetes will kill him, so why should he bother looking after himself. He has regular hospital appointments, and his consultant tells him his levels need to be lower (let's face it, he knows this already!) but otherwise he's offered very little support from the medics. He was offered a DAFNE course, but not locally; he works full time and was unable to take the time off at the time the course was offered (he rents a house and wouldn't get paid for the week off, so worried about his cash-flow!) Just to add a further complication, he occasionally develops allergies to insulin, so something that works one week may suddenly stop working the next, making him feel very ill in the process. Recently I've noticed that he's turning his back more and more on the fact that he has diabetes; his friends tell me that he's no longer testing, often doesn't take his insulin, and apparently has missed hospital appointments. I challenged him about this, and he simply said 'what's the point?'. I'm terrified that he'll be found in a coma or worse, but when I try to talk to him about looking after himself, he becomes angry, and simply won't discuss the subject with me. Has anyone else had similar experi Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes?

The best weekly exercise routine for healthy,... I am a healthy 20-year-old student and am wondering if you could tell me the symptoms of diabetes? ... I am a healthy 20-year-old student and am wondering if you could tell me the symptoms of diabetes? Diabetes remains a greatly underdiagnosed problem, and it is estimated that up to 2 per cent of the UK population are actually diabetic but do not realise it. Although everyone is different and so symptoms vary from person to person, there are some typically common ones present, including; passing urine more frequently both by day and night drinking more fluid but always feeling that you need more spots, boils and skin infections that do not seem to heal lack of energy and problems with exercising. There are other less common symptoms but if you have any of these then see your doctor and take a sample of urine with you so that a urine test can be done to test for the presence of sugar and may put your mind at rest straight away. Good luck. I hope you have found this answer of help to you. The materials in this web site are in no way intended to replace the professional medical care, advice, diagnosis or treatment of a doctor. The web site does not have answers to all problems. Answers to specific problems may not apply to everyone. If you notice medical symptoms or feel ill, you should consult your doctor - for further information see our Terms and conditions . NetDoctor is a publication of Hearst Magazines UK which is the trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd, 72 Broadwick Street, London, W1F 9EP. Registered in England 112955. All rights reserved. NetDoctor, part of the Hearst UK wellbeing network. Copyright 2018. Continue reading >>

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