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Diabetes At Age 20

Diabetes In My 20s: Far From Sweet

Diabetes In My 20s: Far From Sweet

I am sure that many 20-somethings have had this thought, subconsciously or otherwise. Even if we dont actually think it, this idea is what drives 20-somethings to act the way they do. Teen years are over! No more pleated skirts to iron and white shirts to bleach. For most of us, the world becomes focused on full-time jobs or tertiary education. We watch our elders age, and shake our heads when an old Uncle or Tantie is in hospital for sugar or pressure. I suppose many of us imagine that these diseases are for the old at least this is what I felt. So imagine my shock when I was diagnosed with diabetes. One morning, I woke up with a strange buzzing and heaviness in my left ear. It all started with a routine visit to the doctor back in 2009. One morning, I woke up with a strange buzzing and heaviness in my left ear. Walking about seemed to be a huge challenge. I bumped into everything (and I do mean everything), and every time I turned my head too fast, Id feel my body starting to tip to the left. Eventually, the sensation moved to my other ear, so I swallowed my stubbornness and went to the doctor. Everything about that visit was perfectly normal. I peed in a cup and endured the painful squeeze of having my pressure tested. The kind medical assistant wanted to know if I was diabetic, as there was sugar in my urine, but quickly allayed my worry, and said the doctor would handle it. The doctor was really interested in the sugar in my urine. He was even more interested in my frequent thirst (I get thirsty a lot), my feeling tired all the time (I doh get much sleep, nah), and going to the toilet a lot (because of all the water I drink, Doc). I was advised urgently to get a number of tests done, which I did in two twos. Four days later, I was back in his office. My ears seeme Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

For years, distinguishing between the various types of diabetes was pretty straightforward: “Juvenile diabetes,” an autoimmune disease, was diagnosed primarily in children and teenagers when their own body’s immune system destroyed the insulin-producing (beta) cells in their pancreas. “Adult-onset diabetes” occurred in adults and was generally associated with insulin resistance and often with overweight. And “gestational diabetes” occurred in pregnant women and disappeared once the pregnancy was over. In the past 25 years, however, determining what type of diabetes a person has has become more of a challenge. In large part, that’s because more and more children and teenagers are now being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes — the type that occurred predominantly in adults in generations past. Most of these children and teens are overweight. At the same time, it’s becoming clearer that Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age and sometimes occurs in people who are overweight. In addition, another type of diabetes, called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, or LADA, that shares some characteristics with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, has been recognized. Muddying the water further is the realization that diabetic ketoacidosis, an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes that is caused by a lack of insulin, can occur in people with Type 2 diabetes — not just in people with Type 1, as was previously thought. And while gestational diabetes is still diagnosed only in pregnant women, it is sometimes discovered that what is thought to be gestational diabetes is really Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes that happens to start during pregnancy. The incidence of diabetes has increased so greatly around the world in the past 25 years that health organizations and med Continue reading >>

14 Realities Of Having Type 1 Diabetes In Your 20s

14 Realities Of Having Type 1 Diabetes In Your 20s

14 realities of having type 1 diabetes in your 20s Today is World Diabetes Day and while millions of people live with the condition, only 10% of them have Type 1 which develops when insulin-producing cells have been destroyed and the body is unable to produce enough. Type 1 is usually diagnosed in children, so what is it like to find out you have it as an adult? Lauren Proctor, 25, developed diabetes in March 2009, during her second year of university at Keele in Staffordshire, England. She now works as a PA in London. Lauren put the symptoms down to her student lifestyle at first (Lauren Proctor) Here, Lauren explains the reality of suffering from the lifelong condition in your twenties. I brushed off my symptoms as all part of being a student. The tiredness especially, I couldnt get through the day without having an afternoon nap. And I was drinking a lot of water, once I had to ask a girl I didnt know sitting next to me in a lecture if I could have some of her water, because I was parched. Id get through an entire bottle of squash in a day. Over a month I just felt worse but when I went to the toilet five times in one night, and was almost in a car crash because my vision had started to be affected, I Googled my symptoms. 2. No one expects adults to be diagnosed with Type 1. Type 1 is also known as juvenile diabetes because most cases are found in children. To be diagnosed at the age of 19 was pretty rare. After Googling I was convinced I had Type 2 diabetes and went to the campus surgery. The nurses said because I was young and slim it wouldnt be diabetes, Id be fine. Then they took my blood sugar and it was 15.5 a normal reading would be six to eight. So I was taken to hospital where I was diagnosed as Type 1, and the doctors were really surprised because of my ag Continue reading >>

This Is What It's Like To Be Diagnosed With Diabetes At 20 Years Old

This Is What It's Like To Be Diagnosed With Diabetes At 20 Years Old

Prick my finger. Let test strip draw up blood. Watch the wheels spin on the electronic screen. Hold my breath. Say a little prayer to the man (or woman) upstairs. The readout says 336—a whopping 200 points higher than ideal. I knew I shouldn’t have eaten that half of a bagel two hours ago. But I am only human. Mornings like these are all too common in the life of a young diabetic. I’ll prick myself as many as five to 10 times by the end of the day, hoping to find myself in the blood sugar sweet spot. Juvenile, or type 1, diabetes is viewed as something that only lasts while you live under your parents’ roof, not something that stays with you forever. But it does. It is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone that enables the body to take digested sugar out of the bloodstream and deliver it to cells, which use it for energy. It is much rarer than type 2 diabetes, and usually appears in children and adolescents, though it can sometimes come on in adulthood. Diagnosed at 20 years old, I had more time with a working pancreas than others with type 1. I got to experience a relatively carefree childhood, eating and playing like everyone else. But now, at almost 22, I change my pump and prick my finger as often as, if not more than, my ten-year-old counterparts. I was originally misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes the summer before my sophomore year at Boston University, after a routine blood test showed an elevation in my blood sugar numbers. Over the next few months, as my pancreas gave out its last bits of insulin, my symptoms worsened, and I was finally given the right diagnosis. I spent the better part of my sophomore year learning to ignore an ever-present thirst and the constant feeling of having to pee. I vividly remember Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In The Young

Type 2 Diabetes In The Young

The evolving epidemic The topic of the International Diabetes Federation Consensus conference, held 7–9 February 2003 in Santa Monica, California, was “Type 2 Diabetes in the Young: The Evolving Epidemic” (1). The topic has become a clinical and health economic priority, with important implications for an increasing health care burden throughout the world. Aspects of these conditions have recently been reviewed (1,2). Epidemiology We are in the midst of an epidemic of lack of exercise, of obesity, of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), and of diabetes in young persons. The diabetogenic process begins in fetal life, with low birth weight and poor nutrition combining with sedentary lifestyle and dietary factors to produce an insulin-resistant phenotype that may accelerate the development of renal pathology and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Worldwide, the number of persons with diabetes has tripled since 1985. In Australia, 1.7 and 1.4% of persons aged 35–44 and 45–54 years, respectively, had diabetes in 1981, and these rates increased to 2.5 and 6.2% in 2000 (3), suggesting a trend to earlier age of onset of diabetes. The prevalence rates of obesity (BMI exceeding the 95th percentile) among U.S. children and adolescents aged 6–11 and 12–19 years, respectively, were 4.2 and 4.6% in 1963–1970, 4.0 and 6.1% in 1971–1974, 6.5 and 5.0% in 1976–1980, 11.3 and 10.5% in 1988–1994, and 15.3 and 15.5% in 1999–2000, an alarming rate of increase. Obesity (weight corrected for height >95th percentile) among U.S. children increased between 1988 and 1999 from 7 to 10% among those aged 2–5 years (Fig. 1) (4,5). In a cross-sectional survey of children 9–12 years old in Hong Kong, 38% of girls, but 57% of boys, were overweight, with overweight children of bot Continue reading >>

How Is This Possible? Being Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes At 20- Page 4

How Is This Possible? Being Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes At 20- Page 4

Lol, it happens. I make my doctor order a CBC at least annually even if they insist there's no indication. I try not to be too paranoid, but c'mon, humor me a little here. I was having my doctor order a FBG about once a year, too, because 4 of my father's sisters were type 2. Well, I was a little overweight and a few years back the doc did diagnose me with type 2--I had 2 consecutive FBGs of 126! A weight loss of 30# and I'm staying off of meds so far. My A1C is around 6 One of our resident physicians was diagnosed with type 1. He was doing a surgery rotation, and I understand he collapsed in the OR. My dad was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 48. One day he just started looking sooo super skinny to me, and was acting different. He was always thin and in good shape and very cool calm and collected. We made him go to the Dr and his blood sugar was 500something...... At first they thought T2 because of his age, but when they finally got all the test results back it was T1. They think he got a virus that year sometime and that is what caused it. Newly DX at 39 with Hyperglycemia. Followed by a series of other health issues. So, I turn the clock back, I've been a chubby gal for many years, so I decided to loose some weight, I went on the "Salad and Yogurt Diet"...Such a dummy I was. I did this for so long, 7 months that I insulted my pancreas to the point that I had chronic low blood sugar, ie Hypoglycemia. MD said..well in about 15 or 16 years, your body will convert to Hyperglycemia, so get ready there is nothing you can do about it. 8 months recurrent yeast infections, tried OTC (yes, I know better but No not me!) I was still heavy, but ate well and exercised, I thought I could ward it off) Went to MD, they did an AC1 (stat)..14.6 Feb 09 Oh, shut. Thats why my sores Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

In Teens, Diabetes Takes A More Dangerous Course

In Teens, Diabetes Takes A More Dangerous Course

THURSDAY, May 23, 2013 – A growing number of overweight teens are developing type 2 diabetes before they graduate from high school or learn how to drive, and new research paints an increasingly dismal picture for their future. The disease progresses more quickly in youth than adults, and children with type 2 diabetes rapidly develop signs of complications such as heart and kidney disease, according to a series of studies from the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) trial published today in a special issue of the journal Diabetes Care. These findings are especially concerning because the teens in the study had poor outcomes despite receiving optimal care and close monitoring from a team of diabetes experts. “Type 2 diabetes, when it occurs in youth, is a very, very, very rapidly progressing and serious disease — far worse than in the more typical 50-, 60-, or 70-year-old person who develops diabetes,” said Kenneth Copeland, MD, director of the children’s program at the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma and the national co-chair of the TODAY study. “It is extremely difficult to treat with any of the modalities we have available to us right now, and it progresses relentlessly towards complications regardless of the form of treatment that we offer them.” Compounding the problem is the fact that only two type 2 diabetes medications are approved for use in children. Physicians have limited options to help young people keep their blood sugar under control and minimize the risk for health problems down the road. About 3,700 people under age 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. each year. While that figure is small compared to the incidence in adults, the number of children living with the dise Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes In My Early 20s?

Pre-diabetes In My Early 20s?

Hello, Im new here! My name is Veronica, and Im from Montreal. Im 23 years old, and a university student Last month I went to my GP because a cousin of mine came to visit me, and she was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and was really into testing everybodys blood sugar when she had to check hers. My two hours after lunch number was 13.3 mmol/L and my aunt felt that was too high and said that I should bring it up with my GP. Having a long family history of diabetes (my dad and grandpa have type 2, and my maternal grandmother, my moms sister and her four children all have type 1), I decided this was a good idea. I hadnt had any symptoms, but better to get it checked out and have it be nothing, than to do nothing and have it be something. I made an appointment with my GP for later that week. My dad (a type 2 - I still live with my parents while in university) decided to take a few more numbers with his meter on the Sunday prior to my appointment. My fasting number was 7.2, my 2 hours after breakfast was 15.9, before lunch it was 7.7, and two hours after it was 13.1, before dinner it was 6.8 and two hours after it was 9.9. Before bed it had come down to 9.1. I told my GP this, and she sent me for blood work. My fasting blood sugar according to the lab was 6.8 mmol/L (which they flagged as too high) and my hemoglobin A1C was 6.3%. My GP said that my A1C was totally fine but that my fasting blood sugar was a bit too high, was pre-diabetes, and that I should try and lose 5lbs to correct this (Im 56 and weigh 160lbs). I cant even figure out how to lose 5lbs. I already take 25 000 steps a day and swim an hour every day. She said she didnt want to prescribe any medications or do any further testing (I asked if she should check me from type 1 antibodies and she said no, Continue reading >>

20 Years Old, Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes... Anyone Else Out There?

20 Years Old, Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes... Anyone Else Out There?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community 20 years old, newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes... anyone else out there? So I have recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, I am 20 years old, 5ft 4 and weighing 13st 8lbs (190lbs). I know my BMI is obese and I have recently lost 2 stone (previous weight 16st 8lbs) this was prior to being diagnosed with type 2. My HBA1C was 99 (meant to be 48). I have been searching online for people who are my age with type 2 and have found it isnt common as most people diagnosed with type 2 are late 30s-40s. Just wondering who else is young diagnosed with type 2, I also have PCOS and was wondering is it true that if you develop type 2 at a young age it gets worse? I am desperate for more information on other peoples experience with type 2 and some advice! maybe connecting with someone via email or facebook? Bebo321 Family member Well-Known Member So I have recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, I am 20 years old, 5ft 4 and weighing 13st 8lbs (190lbs). I know my BMI is obese and I have recently lost 2 stone (previous weight 16st 8lbs) this was prior to being diagnosed with type 2. My HBA1C was 99 (meant to be 48). I have been searching online for people who are my age with type 2 and have found it isnt common as most people diagnosed with type 2 are late 30s-40s. Just wondering who else is young diagnosed with type 2, I also have PCOS and was wondering is it true that if you develop type 2 at a young age it gets worse? I am desperate for more information on other peoples experience with type 2 and some advice! maybe connecting with someone via email or facebook? Continue reading >>

Can We Get Diabetes At The Age Of 23?

Can We Get Diabetes At The Age Of 23?

Yes Sir. It is possible to develop diabetes in your 20’s. However its quite challenging nowadays to determine the type of diabetes an individual has. Three major categories of Diabetes have been observed so far- Adult onset diabetes (Type 2 diabetes or NIDDM) which is the most common form that affects 90% of the diabetic population. However this is also seen in obese pre-teens. Early-onset diabetes (Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or IDDM)observed in a much younger population and diagnosed mostly in the teens. Gestational diabetes which develops in pregnant women. The type of diabetes that we are talking here is called early -onset or type-1 diabetes. In younger individuals, we refer to it as Juvenile diabetes.This is something what we call an auto-immune disorder wherein your immune system mistakenly sees the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas as foreign, and destroys them. The exact mechanism of how this condition is developed has not been completely elucidated, but its known that certain viral infections can trigger it. When your body develops this form of diabetes the arrival of its characteristic symptoms seems quite sudden which is in contrast to the type-2 diabetes whose symptoms take much longer time to express. The condition manifests as symptoms that include weight loss despite eating more, constant thirst and urination, and nausea, low blood pressure and low body temperature. If not treated for this disorder it can lead to severely debilitating conditions of the heart and blood vessels, kidneys, nervous system, eyes, mouth, hands and feet. There is no complete cure for diabetes especially the type-1 form as of now. Keeping a regular check on your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol,embracing an active lifestyle and proper food habits should Continue reading >>

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 21 million people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The CDC also notes that 90 to 95 percent of cases in adults involve type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 2 diabetes was most prevalent in older adults. But due to widespread poor lifestyle habits, it’s more common in younger people than ever before. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. Learn what you can do to prevent or delay its onset, no matter your age. Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, there were a total of 1.7 million new total diabetes cases in 2012. In 2012, adults aged 45 to 64 were the most diagnosed age group for diabetes. New cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people aged 20 years and older were distributed as follows: ages 20 to 44: 371,000 new cases ages 45 to 64: 892,000 new cases age 65 and older: 400,000 new cases People aged 45 to 64 were also developing diabetes at a faster rate, edging out adults aged 65 and older. Type 2 diabetes used to be only prevalent in adults. It was once called “adult-onset” diabetes. Now, because it is becoming more common in children, it’s simply called “type 2" diabetes. While type 1 diabetes, which is believed to be due to an autoimmune reaction, is more common in children and young adults, type 2 diabetes is rising in incidence, attributed in part to poor lifestyle habits. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 5,090 people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care considered the potential future number of diabetes cases in people under the age of 20. The study found that, at current rates, the number of people under the age o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes and typically affects younger individuals. Type 1 diabetes usually begins before age 40, although there have been people diagnosed at an older age. In the United States, the peak age at diagnosis is around 14. Type 1 diabetes is associated with deficiency (or lack) of insulin. It is not known why, but the pancreatic islet cells quit producing insulin in the quantities needed to maintain a normal blood glucose level. Without sufficient insulin, the blood glucose rises to levels which can cause some of the common symptoms of hyperglycemia. These individuals seek medical help when these symptoms arise, but they often will experience weight loss developing over several days associated with the onset of their diabetes. The onset of these first symptoms may be fairly abrupt or more gradual. To learn more about type 1 diabetes basics, see our type 1 diabetes slideshow. It has been estimated that the yearly incidence of type 1 diabetes developing is 3.7 to 20 per 100,000. More than 700,000 Americans have this type of diabetes. This is about 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes; the other 90% have type 2 diabetes. What You Need to Know about Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Causes Type 1 diabetes usually develops due to an autoimmune disorder. This is when the body's immune system behaves inappropriately and starts seeing one of its own tissues as foreign. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the islet cells of the pancreas that produce insulin are seen as the "enemy" by mistake. The body then creates antibodies to fight the "foreign" tissue and destroys the islet cells' ability to produce insulin. The lack of sufficient insulin thereby results in diabetes. It is unknown why this autoimmune diabetes develops. Most often Continue reading >>

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