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Diabetes At 25

Diagnosis: Type 2 Diabetes. Age: 24.

Diagnosis: Type 2 Diabetes. Age: 24.

A few days after Christmas 2008, Mike Durbin of Fort Wayne, Ind., got an unwanted holiday surprise: a double diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure. His blood glucose was well above normal, and his heart was functioning at only 30 to 35 percent of its capacity. “That scared the hell out of me,” he says. His diabetes diagnosis, however, was not a complete shock. His grandmother has type 2 diabetes, and his great-grandparents had the condition as well. He also had a number of risk factors, including excess weight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides. Yet he had one advantage — his age. He was only 24. It might seem surprising that someone so young could develop type 2 diabetes, but the disease is on the rise among the under-30 set. In fact, 5.7 percent of all new cases of diabetes occur in people between 18 and 29, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. Another 3.5 percent of diagnoses happen before patients’ 35th birthdays. In Durbin’s case, he was sent to the doctor with a diabetes symptom that just wouldn’t quit — a yeast infection. “As I’ve learned, yeast infections are common among people living with the various types of diabetes,” Durbin says. “The infection led me to the doctor. Tests were done, and I was diagnosed with type 2. Other tests done at that time revealed that I had congestive heart failure as well. In hindsight, I realized I had a lot of the typical symptoms also — increased thirst, dry mouth, frequent urination, fatigue, blurred vision, and headaches.” Creating a Diabetes Management Plan Durbin has made important lifestyle changes now that he’s living with type 2 diabetes. For starters, he checks his blood glucose at least four times a day: when he wakes up, befo Continue reading >>

Screening For Diabetes

Screening For Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form of the disease, is often asymptomatic in its early stages and can remain undiagnosed for many years. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes is associated with long-term dysfunction, damage, and failure of various organs, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Individuals with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes are also at significantly higher risk for stroke, coronary heart disease, and peripheral vascular disease than the nondiabetic population. They also have a greater likelihood of having dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. Because early detection and prompt treatment may reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications, screening for diabetes may be appropriate under certain circumstances. This position statement provides recommendations for diabetes screenings performed in physicians’ offices and in other health care settings. This position statement does not address screening for type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Because of the acute onset of symptoms, most cases of type 1 diabetes are detected soon after symptoms develop. Widespread clinical testing of asymptomatic individuals for the presence of autoantibodies related to type 1 diabetes cannot be recommended at this time as a means to identify persons at risk. Reasons for this include the following: 1) cutoff values for some of the immune marker assays have not been completely established in clinical settings; 2) there is no consensus as to what action should be taken when a positive autoantibody test result is obtained; and 3) because the incidence of type 1 diabetes is low Continue reading >>

A 25-year-old Woman With Type 2 Diabetes And Liver Disease

A 25-year-old Woman With Type 2 Diabetes And Liver Disease

Case Rep Gastroenterol. 2014 Sep-Dec; 8(3): 398403. Published online 2014 Dec 12. doi: 10.1159/000369968 A 25-Year-Old Woman with Type 2 Diabetes and Liver Disease Anders Ellekr Junker ,a,b Lise Lotte Gluud ,c Jens Pedersen ,b Jill Levin Langhoff ,d Jens Juul Holst ,b Filip Krag Knop ,a and Tina Vilsbll a,* aCenter for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Copenhagen, Denmark bNNF Center for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark cDepartment of Gastroenterology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, Denmark dDepartment of Pathology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark *Prof. Tina Vilsbll, Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kildegrdsvej 28, DK-2900 Hellerup (Denmark), E-Mail [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Users may download, print and share this work on the Internet for noncommercial purposes only, provided the original work is properly cited, and a link to the original work on and the terms of this license are included in any shared versions. A 25-year-old female nurse was referred to our diabetes outpatient clinic with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, obesity and elevated liver function tests (LFTs). Following a liver biopsy she was diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and liver fibrosis. Treatment with subcutaneous injections of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults

For years, distinguishing between the various types of diabetes was pretty straightforward: “Juvenile diabetes,” an autoimmune disease, was diagnosed primarily in children and teenagers when their own body’s immune system destroyed the insulin-producing (beta) cells in their pancreas. “Adult-onset diabetes” occurred in adults and was generally associated with insulin resistance and often with overweight. And “gestational diabetes” occurred in pregnant women and disappeared once the pregnancy was over. In the past 25 years, however, determining what type of diabetes a person has has become more of a challenge. In large part, that’s because more and more children and teenagers are now being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes — the type that occurred predominantly in adults in generations past. Most of these children and teens are overweight. At the same time, it’s becoming clearer that Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age and sometimes occurs in people who are overweight. In addition, another type of diabetes, called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, or LADA, that shares some characteristics with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, has been recognized. Muddying the water further is the realization that diabetic ketoacidosis, an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes that is caused by a lack of insulin, can occur in people with Type 2 diabetes — not just in people with Type 1, as was previously thought. And while gestational diabetes is still diagnosed only in pregnant women, it is sometimes discovered that what is thought to be gestational diabetes is really Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes that happens to start during pregnancy. The incidence of diabetes has increased so greatly around the world in the past 25 years that health organizations and med Continue reading >>

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 21 million people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The CDC also notes that 90 to 95 percent of cases in adults involve type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 2 diabetes was most prevalent in older adults. But due to widespread poor lifestyle habits, it’s more common in younger people than ever before. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. Learn what you can do to prevent or delay its onset, no matter your age. Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, there were a total of 1.7 million new total diabetes cases in 2012. In 2012, adults aged 45 to 64 were the most diagnosed age group for diabetes. New cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people aged 20 years and older were distributed as follows: ages 20 to 44: 371,000 new cases ages 45 to 64: 892,000 new cases age 65 and older: 400,000 new cases People aged 45 to 64 were also developing diabetes at a faster rate, edging out adults aged 65 and older. Type 2 diabetes used to be only prevalent in adults. It was once called “adult-onset” diabetes. Now, because it is becoming more common in children, it’s simply called “type 2" diabetes. While type 1 diabetes, which is believed to be due to an autoimmune reaction, is more common in children and young adults, type 2 diabetes is rising in incidence, attributed in part to poor lifestyle habits. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 5,090 people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care considered the potential future number of diabetes cases in people under the age of 20. The study found that, at current rates, the number of people under the age o Continue reading >>

Red Flags For Type 2 Diabetes Seen 25 Years Before Diagnosis

Red Flags For Type 2 Diabetes Seen 25 Years Before Diagnosis

Red flags for type 2 diabetes seen 25 years before diagnosis SAN DIEGO Based on their analysis of a cohort of more than half a million people, Swedish researchers now believe that mildly elevated fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride levels could indicate an increased risk for type 2 diabetes a quarter-century before diagnosis. Previous studies have shown that risk factors for type 2 diabetes, including obesity and elevated fasting glucose, may be present up to 10 years before disease onset. Our study extends this period to more than 20 years before diagnosis, said the studys lead author Hkan Malmstrm, PhD , an epidemiologist with the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm. Even small elevations in subjects over time early in life may be important to recognize, in particular for people who are overweight or obese. The study findings were presented in an oral presentation at the scientific sessions of the American Diabetes Association. The researchers identified 47,997 new type 2 diabetes cases in a Swedish cohort of 537,119 people tracked from 1985-2012. For each case, they compared risk factors from clinical examinations performed from 1985-1996 with those of five matched controls. They found that on average, several risk factors were more common among individuals with type 2 diabetes, compared with the matched controls many years before the diagnosis, Dr. Malmstrm said. In particular, BMI [body mass index], fasting triglycerides, fasting glucose, the apo B/apo A-I ratio and inflammatory markers were increased up to 25 years before the diagnosis. For example, 25 years before diagnosis, mean fasting plasma glucose in the type 2 diabetes group was higher than controls at 90 mg/dL vs. 86 mg/dL, respectively. By 10 years before diagnosis, that gap had widened to 98 mg/dL vs. 8 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

25 Year Old.... Pre-diabetic? Confused And Concerned

25 Year Old.... Pre-diabetic? Confused And Concerned

25 year old.... pre-diabetic? Confused and concerned Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum. I wasn't sure where to ask this but after looking at so many sites I figured this was the best place. I took some numbers with a meter and I'm not exactly sure what they mean. Recently (last august 2012) I went in to have blood work done because I was feeling really drowsy and a general feel of sluggishness after I eat (little more than just typical food coma, and does not matter how much i eat) and they found my A1c was 5.8% and said it was slightly high and that I should take some preventative measures. I admit those particular few months I've been eating pretty badly (lots of carbs, pizza, sugars,) since it was a stressful semester for me in grad school. Afterwards I did some research and decided to get a monitor to just see what was exactly going on, and these were some numbers that I found concerning when I ate meals with refined carbs. 1/11/13: Roughly 1 cup of white rice with some beef/salsa 1/14/13: 1 cup of white rice, chicken/salsa/ dinner: 2 chicken breasts, 1 cup of corn, and a bowl of chinese cabbage I would love to hear anyones thoughts on these numbers. Do they qualify as pre-diabetic/glucose intolerance? My fastings are pretty normal but the post meal sugars are the ones that are worrisome. Frankly I was really anxious over this period and was really worried about my health. I weighed 195lbs and was 5 ft 9, so I'm def overweight, and my grandmother had diabetes. Since those last couple months I have dropped 15 lbs and have pretty much cut out all sorts of refined carbs, for meals where I eat no carbs (chicken breasts and some veggies) my numbers are actually pretty low (way below 120 at the 1 hr mark). I NO LONGER EAT LIKE THE FOODS I LISTED HERE. Since it's been a Continue reading >>

25 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

25 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Trivia can be fun and interesting, especially when you are learning about something that is close to home. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does, you might want to learn some interesting facts about this disease. Seeing how greatly treatment has evolved can be empowering. In addition, learning more about diabetes can help to increase your awareness and motivate you to take control. The earliest known written record that likely referred to diabetes was in 1500 B.C in the Egyptian Ebers papyrus. It referred to the symptoms of frequent urination. Diabetes symptoms such as thirst, weight loss, and excess urination were recognized for more than 1200 years before the disease was named. The Greek physician Aretaeus (30-90CE) was credited with coming up with the name "diabetes." He recorded a disease with symptoms such as constant thirst (polydipsia), excessive urination (polyuria) and weight loss. He named the condition "diabetes," meaning "a flowing through." Dr. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) called diabetes the "pissing evil" and described the urine of people with type 2 diabetes as "wonderfully sweet, as if it was imbued with honey or sugar." He was also the first to describe pain and stinging from nerve damage due to diabetes. In ancient times, doctors would test for diabetes by tasting urine to see if it was sweet. People who tasted urine to check for diabetes were called "water tasters." Other diagnostic measures included checking to see if urine attracted ants or flies. In the late 1850's, a French physician named Priorry advised his patients with diabetes to eatlarge quantities of sugar. Obviously, that method of treatment did not last, as sugar increases blood sugars. Back in the day, there were no blood glucose meters. Instead, they tested for blood sugar u Continue reading >>

Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards℠

Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards℠

The Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards program recognizes people with type 1 diabetes who have successfully managed diabetes with insulin for 10, 25, 50, or 75 years. At Lilly Diabetes, we recognize that every person with type 1 diabetes is on a unique and challenging lifelong journey. But they’re not alone—and while we work hard to equip people with the resources they need to help overcome challenges, we’re also here to celebrate the successes. The Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards program has recognized thousands of individuals who have successfully managed their diabetes for 10, 25, 50, even 75 years. The awards are meant to honor those who have long been successful, but also to inspire others to believe they can do it, too. Healthcare professionals can also support and honor patients in their community with a live presentation Journey Awards ceremony. Those who receive Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards are a testament to all people with diabetes that learning how to manage their health and adapting to the ever-changing technology of diabetes care can lead to a long and successful diabetes journey. Medals Medals are presented to people with diabetes in the United States throughout the year. Applicants must have type 1 diabetes and must have been taking any brand of insulin continuously for 10, 25, 50, or 75 years to qualify. Each recipient receives an elegant award, beautifully engraved with their name, along with a signed letter from our CEO, Dave Ricks, encouraging their continued success. We also invite 75-year award recipients to have their names engraved on a special monument on our Indianapolis campus. This monument is a tribute to lives well-lived with type 1 diabetes and reminds us of the long history we share with those who are able to live long, healthy lives by m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

25 Years Old With Type 2..

25 Years Old With Type 2..

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi everyone. Another newbie diagnosed with type 2. A bit about my diabetes journey so far.. My GP discovered I had sugar in my wee just before the New Year a couple of months ago, after visiting the doctors for another reason. A few blood tests later and I was told my blood sugar was 16.2 and HBA1c was 77. Another test at the start of January actually showed my blood sugar had gone up to 17.9 (random sample). So safe to say it was astronomically high! GP believed it to be Type 1 because of my age (I'm only 25), however it was confirmed to be Type 2 due to a prevalent family history and after another blood test which showed I was still producing insulin. GP wanted to start me on insulin/tablets straight away, however I begged and pleaded for her to give me some time to try and sort it with diet and exercise. Fast forward 5 weeks and a lot of concerned doctors who wanted me to use insulin, and a random blood sugar test showed me to be down to 9.7 this afternoon. Still some way to go but I think we are on the right track. Just thought I would share especially for those newly diagnosed, it can be a stressful and scary time! Looking forward to accessing all the facts and knowledge on the forum and website. Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member Hi. You probably need to get your own blood glucose meter, so you can monitor your blood sugar. When I met with the diabetes nurse five weeks after being T2 diagnosed my blood sugar level was down to 9.8 from 13, but since then it has come down further to around 6.5, with some readings around 5.7 before my evening meals. I am on Metformin, but I suspect that most of my reduction in blood sugar has bee Continue reading >>

Diagnosed At 25

Diagnosed At 25

Usually, when you hear of a person getting diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you think of a child under the age of 10. Well, that’s what I always thought. Boy, was I wrong. On November 25, 2000 I was diagnosed, Yes, with Type 1 diabetes. I clearly was not a child (although my mom may fight you on that), I was a 25 year old woman. Working a full-time job, going out with my friends on weekends, dating, and doing all the things a young adult does. After the diagnosis everything changed. I felt different, scared and alone. Worst of all I was ashamed that I had diabetes. Here I was living my life one way and all of a sudden I was told I had to change everything I have ever known and learn to live a new way. I needed to learn how to draw up syringes, change my diet, count carbs, sliding scales, NPH, Humalog, test blood sugars, high blood sugars, low blood sugars, the list goes on. My daily routine had turned into a three ring circus. My head was spinning from all the information I had to consume in a week. All I kept thinking…WHY ME? What did I do to deserve this? I became very depressed for a very long time after diagnosis. I did not go out as much anymore and was ruining relationships with my friends because I was embarrassed about having diabetes. This went on for over a year. The only place you could find me was at work 9-5. You also learn a lot about your friends when dealing with a chronic illness. A lot of my friends stuck by me and helped me through it but some just bailed. I was lucky though, lucky to have a solid support system in my family. My parents never made me do it alone. As I learned, they learned too. We were all in it together as a family. They came to all my doctor and nutrition appointments with me. My mother learned how to make meals that were better o Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia is defined as blood glucose (sugar) levels that are higher than the target values for the majority of people with diabetes: above 7 mmol/L fasting or before a meal above 10 mmol/L two hours after a meal Hyperglycemia occurs when the amount of insulin in the blood is insufficient or ineffective. When glucose circulating in the blood cannot enter the cells because of a lack of insulin, it accumulates in the blood and raises a person’s glycemia (blood glucose levels) . Symptoms Some people may not notice their hyperglycemia. However, above a certain threshold, high blood sugar can lead to the following symptoms: drowsiness increased urination intense thirst excessive hunger involuntary weight loss irritability dizziness Causes The primary causes of hyperglycemia are: insufficient insulin and/or antidiabetic medication (dosage error or a skipped dose) physical stress (illness, surgery, infection, etc.) or psychological stress (mourning a death, new job, moving, etc.) taking certain drugs (e.g.: cortisone) Hyperglycemia can also be caused by two lesser known phenomena: the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. Preventing hyperglycemia In most cases, hyperglycemia can be avoided by taking the following precautions: Measure your blood glucose (sugar) levels regularly. Follow a daily meal plan designed by a dietitian. Take your insulin or antidiabetic medication as prescribed. Adjust your insulin dose based on your medical prescription Treatment If you experience hyperglycemic symptoms, you should: take your blood glucose (sugar) readings frequently if you have type 1 diabetes: if your blood glucose level is higher than 14 mmol/L, check for ketones in your urine or blood drink lots of water to prevent dehydration (250 ml of water every hour) adjust your insuli Continue reading >>

Success Story: Sarah Boison

Success Story: Sarah Boison

Name: Sarah Boison, age 25 Location: Washington, D.C. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes on Dec. 5, 2012. I felt sick the month before, but I thought it was stress from my graduate classes at Georgetown University. I showed all the signs at the time—thirst, feeling tired, frequent bathroom trips—but I wasn’t informed, so I didn’t know it was diabetes. I went to the doctor and found out my blood glucose was in the mid-300s and my A1C (a measure of average blood glucose control for the past 2 to 3 months) was 10.7. When they told me I had type 2 diabetes, I was scared and my family was worried. My grandma had diabetes and eventually passed away last year because of complications. But it opened up a family dialogue, because I discovered all of my family members were working hard to keep their blood glucose at normal levels. Although they don’t need medication at this time, at some point they all were considered to have prediabetes. I went through stages of grief. Initially, I was in denial about my diet and figured I could still “push it” and eat whatever I wanted. But I found out the hard way when the food made me feel horrible. So I made a huge change by altering my diet and slowly adding exercise. It was hard to go from eating a lot of junk food and carbohydrates to only eating whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies. I started cooking more at home, eating five or six times a day and only drinking water. I had to change the way I looked at food, as I was an emotional eater and enjoyed eating for entertainment. Now, I look at it as fuel and try to eat foods that will give me energy throughout the day and during my workouts. I bought products from the American Diabetes Association, like the portion-control plate and measuring cups, which help me out daily. Continue reading >>

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