diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Arthritis Breakthrough Treatment

Potential Breakthrough In Treating Type 2 Diabetes

Potential Breakthrough In Treating Type 2 Diabetes

By blocking VEGF-B, a signaling protein, fat does not accumulate in muscles and the heart, and the cells within those tissues can respond properly to insulin again, researchers from the Karolinska Institute, Sweden, the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, based in New York, and the Australian biopharmaceutical company CSL Limited reported in the journal Nature. Professor Ulf Eriksson and team carried out experiments on rats and mice, and managed to prevent type II diabetes from developing in the first place, as well as reversing disease progression in animals with established diabetes type II. Nature has described this finding as a "breakthrough in diabetes research". Professor Ulf Eriksson, of the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics at Karolinska Institutet, said: "It's a great feeling to present these results. We discovered VEGF-B back in 1995, and since then the VEGF-B project has been a lengthy sojourn in the wilderness, but now we're making one important discovery after the other. In this present study we've shown that VEGF-B inhibition can be used to prevent and treat type II diabetes, and that this can be done with a drug candidate." Typically, type II diabetes occurs after a person becomes obese, then insulin resistance occurs - the diabetes comes next. When this occurs, the cells do not respond properly to insulin, meaning that glucose does not enter the cells and blood glucose (sugar) levels rise. When fat is stored in the "wrong" places in the body, insulin resistance is much more likely to occur. The wrong places include the blood vessels, heart and muscles. Experts are not sure exactly how the association works. With insulin resistance, not enough glucose enters the cells - it accumulates in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar We Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis

There are over 100 different types of arthritis, with rheumatoid and osteoarthritis being the most common. Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease in which inflammation (pain, heat and swelling) affects the joints and sometimes other organs of the body. The hands, feet and knees are most commonly affected, and often suffer from restricted movement due to the inflammatory response. The onset of rheumatoid arthritis is usually in middle life (between 25 and 45), although it can affect children as young as three years old. This disease affects about two percent of the Australian population, mostly female. Most people with rheumatoid arthritis continue to lead full and active lives, and this is made possible by understanding and appropriately managing the disease. The causes and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks normal tissue components as if they were invading pathogens, causing an inflammatory response. The inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis primarily attacks the linings of the joints. If it persists, cartilage and bone destruction can occur and the joint becomes deformed and immobile. The reason for the immune system reacting in this way is not yet fully understood, although it is thought that it may be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Symptoms vary from person to person and may include: swelling, pain and heat in the joints persistent fatigue joint stiffness (particularly in the morning) sleeping difficulties because of pain weak muscles In general, both sides of the body are affected similarly. Rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed Rheumatoid arthritis usually manifests itself over a period of a few months. However for some, the disease may appear overnight. Rapid onset does not mean the individual Continue reading >>

Hope Of Cure For Arthritis, Ms And Diabetes As Stanford Makes Stem Cell Transplants Safe

Hope Of Cure For Arthritis, Ms And Diabetes As Stanford Makes Stem Cell Transplants Safe

Hundreds of thousands of people could be cured of autoimmune diseases like arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and lupus after scientists discovered how to make stem cell transplants safe. Autoimmune diseases trigger the body into attacking itself but transplants of bone marrow stem cells from healthy donors have been shown to reset the immune system and reverse fatal conditions. However doctors have been reluctant to carry out the treatments as before the healthy cells can be given, the patient must be stripped of the malfunctioning immune system using radiotherapy or chemotherapy. If and when this is accomplished, it will be a whole new era in disease treatment and regenerative medicineProf Irving Weissman, Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine In 20 per cent of cases the patient dies from this stripping procedure and usually surgeons will not attempt a transplant unless there is no other hope. But Stanford University has now shown it is possible to remove the defective immune system using a new technique which encourages the body to eat up the malfunctioning blood cells. So far, researchers have proven it works in animals but are hopeful that it will also be effective in humans. "If it works in humans like it did in mice, we would expect that the risk of death from blood stem cell transplant would drop from 20 per cent to effectively zero," Dr Judith Shizuru, professor of medicine at Stanford. "The chemotherapy and radiation used for transplant damage DNA and can cause both immediate problems and long-term damage to many tissues in the body. “Among the many known toxic side effects, these treatments can cause damage to the liver, reproductive organs and brain, potentially causing seizures and impairing neurological development and g Continue reading >>

What Is Breakthrough Pain?

What Is Breakthrough Pain?

Ask the experts I suffer from chronic back pain and take pain medication frequently. I often suffer severe pain episodes, or spikes in pain. I was told this is "breakthrough pain." What is breakthrough pain? And is there treatment for it? Doctor's response For people who suffer pain all of the time, the concept of breakthrough pain addresses the fact that the level of pain experienced can vary throughout the day. The pain can vary because of different activity levels, medication wearing off, or just "because it does." If a patient were given enough medication to treat all of these spikes in pain, they run the risk of having side effects from being over-medicated. Because pain medications are provided to help improve overall patient function, these side effects are undesirable and should be avoided. The goal is to provide enough sustained release medication to meet the patient's baseline needs, and then add supplemental short acting medication to take when the pain spikes occur. The only study on breakthrough pain was done in cancer patients. It found that up to about three spikes in breakthrough pain occur during the day. In general, the limit on prescription of medications for breakthrough pain is about three or four doses per day. Chronic Pain: Causes and Solutions Medically reviewed by Wayne S. Blocker, MD; Board Certification in Obstetrics and Gynecology REFERENCE: "Use of opioids in the management of chronic non-cancer pain" UpToDate.com Daily Health News Continue reading >>

Breakthrough In Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment?

Breakthrough In Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment?

Baricitinib is an oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor under investigation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) subjects. In a 52-week Phase III trial, 1,307 patients suffering from RA who were taking methotrexate were randomized to baricitinib, placebo, or the TNF inhibitor adalimumab (Humira). Disease activity was measured on several standard RA disease activity scales. Baricitinib was superior to placebo in all measures (P > 0.001) and outperformed adalimumab in the American College of Rheumatology criteria at 12 weeks (70% vs. 61%; P = 0.014). Infections were more common with baricitinib. The authors concluded baricitinib was associated with significant clinical improvements as compared with placebo and adalimumab. (N Engl J Med 2017;376:652-662) Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the most common form of diabetes, is considered a metabolic disorder that results in high-blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) caused by an insulin resistance and deficiency. A normally functioning pancreas will secrete the insulin hormone in low amounts after eating a meal. The glucose (sugar) found in the foods we eat stimulate the secretion of the insulin hormone proportional to the size of each meal. The main role of insulin is to help move specific nutrients into the body’s cells, mainly sugar, which they use as a source of energy. When glucose levels in the bloodstream rise, the beta cells located in the pancreas increase the secretion of insulin to avoid hyperglycemia. In type 2 diabetes, this process works improperly. Instead of moving into your cells to be used as a source of energy, glucose builds up in your bloodstream. Unlike people diagnosed with type 1, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes produce the hormone insulin. The two main problems caused by type 2 diabetes is the pancreas not producing enough insulin and the body not using the insulin sufficiently. A diagnosis of T2DM occurs when the body does not use the hormone insulin properly. The process of improper secretion and absorption is referred to as insulin resistance. In the early stages, the pancreas makes extra insulin to regulate the high blood glucose (sugar) levels, but over time it is not able to make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used properly, glucose can’t get into the body’s cells as it should, causing body’s cells to not function normally. Although it is diagnosed far more than type 1 diabetes, the causes of type 2 diabetes are considered to be less understoo Continue reading >>

Breakthrough Treatment In Osteoarthritis Revealed

Breakthrough Treatment In Osteoarthritis Revealed

A medication discovered by Australian scientists is set to help millions of people who suffer from the pain of osteoarthritis, the most common cause of chronic pain in Australia. Osteoarthritis is caused by thinning of cartilage in joints, resulting in bones rubbing together, creating stiffness, pain, and difficulty in moving. There is currently no effective medication for it, other thank taking anti-inflammatories or other pain relief, which is why most who suffer from it opt for a hip or knee replacement. This medication might put that decision off the a number of years. Australian scientists Professor Peter Ghoshand and Dr Jegan Krishnan have found a medication, already being used for 70 years to treat blood clots and urinary tract infections, has the remarkable effect of eliminating osteoarthritis pain, reports The Daily Telegraph. The pair discovered a link between bone marrow lesions and the swelling that causes pain and cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. While there are more clinical trials needed, so far the results have been incredibly positive, with 70 per cent seeing significants reductions in pain. One woman describing her pain going from an eight, on a scale of one to ten, with ten being the highest, down to zero, after six injections over three weeks. The topic was discussed on Sunrise this morning, with a Dr Ginny Mansberg describing the total effect of arthritis on patients. She said it was too early to say if this was going to be a miracle cure, as there was a large amount of placebo effects when it came to pain related trials. Osteoarthritis Breakthrough: More than 3 million Australians suffer from this condition. @Dr_Ginni #sun7 pic.twitter.com/Po8vplit94 — Sunrise (@sunriseon7) September 9, 2017 Phase 2 of the clinical trial is expected to st Continue reading >>

Diabetes Stem Cell Breakthrough A Reality

Diabetes Stem Cell Breakthrough A Reality

1 out of 4 Americans are living with diabetes or at high risk for developing diabetes. People living with diabetes now have a new option when it comes to treating the disease. This Diabetes stem cell breakthrough is changing the face of diabetic medicine.* It is a new non-invasive therapy, a technologically advanced approach to decreasing your blood sugar levels and may also lower your need for insulin injections.* If you want to know more about Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes and this Diabetes stem cell breakthrough, keep reading to learn more. Feel free to get in touch with NSI Stem Cell in Florida. NSI Stem Cell is an FDA guidelines-compliant medical clinic that treats a variety of illnesses, injuries and chronic conditions like Peripheral Neuropathy, Arthritis and much more.* How This Diabetes Stem Cell Breakthrough Is Improving Lives People living with Diabetes can experience many different kinds of symptoms, including the following: Blurred vision Frequent urination Increased hunger and thirst Nausea and vomiting Weakness and fatigue When it comes to long term complications, it may include the following: Cancer Eye problems Energy and memory loss Heart attach and stroke Kidney failure Loss of limbs Painful neuropathies Painful foot ulcers The symptoms and complications of Diabetes are the consequence from the failure of the body to regulate sugars. Thus, it is important to understand how and why these symptoms occur. A better understanding of how Stem Cell Diabetic Treatment can help relieve diabetic symptoms, prevent long term complications and lessen your need for insulin injections is just a call away.* During the digestion process, the ingested food is broken down into carbohydrates, protein and fats. The carbohydrates are converted into glucose, which is the b Continue reading >>

Arthritis And Diabetes

Arthritis And Diabetes

Tweet Arthritis is the term for conditions which cause inflammation of the joints. There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis, with a broad range of causes. Some of these forms of arthritis have close associations with certain types of diabetes. Arthritis can usually be treated to help reduce symptoms and slow progression of the condition. How common is arthritis? Arthritis is common, with an estimated 10 million people living with the condition in the UK alone. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting around 8 million in the UK. Whilst arthritis is most commonly associated with the elderly, a number of forms or arthritis can affect people of any age, including children. Types of arthritis Whilst there are many dozen forms or causes of arthritis, the following are some of the more common forms: Osteoarthritis - caused by damage to the cartilage in the joints Rheumatoid arthritis - an autoimmune form of arthritis Gout - caused by a build up of uric acid Ankylosing spondylitis - a form which usually causes stiffness in the spine Reactive arthritis - can result from certain infections causing red swollen joints Secondary arthritis - may occur following joint injury Juvenile arthritis - forms of arthritis that affect children Arthritis and diabetes Certain forms of arthritis may be more common in people with certain types of diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes have higher risks of developing osteoarthritis and gout, which is likely on account of the fact that obesity increases the risk of type 2 diabetes as well as these forms of arthritis. People with type 1 diabetes have significantly higher risks of also having rheumatoid arthritis. Both conditions are autoimmune diseases and research suggests that certain genes may increase the risk of Continue reading >>

Breakthrough Development Could Cure Type 1 Diabetes

Breakthrough Development Could Cure Type 1 Diabetes

A team of scientists lead by Professor Douglas Melton of Harvard’s Medical School have developed a technique for converting stem cells into insulin-producing beta cells, a breakthrough that could potentially cure type 1 diabetes. Attack on beta cells Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that currently contributes to 10% of cases of diabetes in South Africa, according to Sweet Life Mag. From this statistic, we can estimate that there are approximately 84 000 to 150 000 type 1 diabetics in South Africa. The condition occurs when the body launches an immune attack on the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. As the beta cells are destroyed, the pancreas can no longer produce the amount of insulin required by the body. This is why type 1 diabetics need to take insulin for the rest of their lives after they develop the condition. Insulin is required to regulate the level of glucose in the blood. Read: Possibility of once weekly insulin shots for diabetics Professor Melton and his team have successfully created cells that can produce insulin, detect the amount of glucose in the blood and excrete the correct amount of insulin into the bloodstream. The cells were then transplanted into diabetic mice where they functioned normally, maintaining the blood glucose levels of the mice for the duration of the six month experiment, CBS News states. This result has taken 15 years to achieve and could mark the end of insulin injections and pumps for type 1 diabetics; however human trials are still some years away. Because the body continues to attack the beta cells in type 1 diabetics, simply placing new beta cells in the pancreas will not solve the problem. After time, these new cells will be destroyed too. Because of this, Melton and his team are working on ways of ‘ Continue reading >>

5 Rosehip Benefits: Treatment For Osteoarthritis, Diabetes And More

5 Rosehip Benefits: Treatment For Osteoarthritis, Diabetes And More

Rosehips are the beautiful red berries that form on rose plants after successful pollination of the flower in summer. These fruits, from the plant Rosa canina, commonly known as wild briar rose or dog rose, has been used as a traditional medicine for centuries to treat ailments such as diarrhea and diabetes.[1] Rosehip is a potent source of vitamin C, and it also contains folate, magnesium, zinc, and vitamins A, B3, D, and E. Rosehips are high in antioxidants like flavonoids, carotenoids, beta-sitosterol, and more.[1] Rosehip benefits include strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, blood- sugar- reducing, and lipid-lowering effects. Arthritis One of the most well studied rosehip benefits is its ability to treat osteoarthritis.[1,2] Rosehip has anti-inflammatory effects and can protect cartilage from damage, which may explain its ability to relieve osteoarthritis pain.[3] In one study on patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis, supplementation with 5 g per day of rosehip powder resulted in less pain and a lower need for rescue medication after only three weeks.[4] Rosehip may be as effective, if not more effective, than glucosamine, which is a well established natural treatment for osteoarthritis.[1] Rosehip may also help to treat rheumatoid arthritis . People who received 5 g rose hip daily showed improvement in symptoms, while those who received placebo got worse.[5] Heart disease Studies show that rosehip reduces risk factors for cardiovascular disease, too, including systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. It improves LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio as well, according to a study of 31 obese people who drank a rose-hip drink daily for six weeks. The authors of the study estimated that the reductions in these risk factors decreased the risk for card Continue reading >>

New Arthritis Breakthrough: Incredible 10p Patch Will Save Sufferers Years Of Pain

New Arthritis Breakthrough: Incredible 10p Patch Will Save Sufferers Years Of Pain

The easy-to-wear “smart patch” will save sufferers from years of pain by early detection of the crippling disease. It is also poised to save the hard-pressed NHS tens of millions of pounds. Diagnosing arthritis before it fully develops will allow the early use of crucial preventative treatments and pain-killing techniques. The disposable device uses acoustic sensors similar to those built into jet wings to detect structural damage. They can “hear” subsonic cracking sounds in knees and other joints. Although still in the early stages of development, academics at Cardiff University believe it will be a game-changer. “It has huge potential to change the way we diagnose osteoarthritis,” said Dr Davide Crivelli, of the School of Engineering at the university. He explained: “If we’re able to link the sound signature of a healthy knee and a knee with disease, we will be able to lower the costs on society a lot.” Dr Crivelli said he hoped the patches could be made for around 10p each. They would be used in GP surgeries before going on mass sale, with the possibility they may one day also being used in a smart phone app. Dr Crivelli added: “The acoustic sensor listens for cracking or rubbing sounds that your joint makes. “If you have early stage osteoarthritis, you may have cartilage damage, which will have a specific sound signature. “These sounds are at high frequencies which we can’t hear, hence the use of specialised acoustic emission sensors “We normally use them in aerospace to listen for cracking sounds from damage.” The thin electronic patches are likely to be no more than an inch-and-a-half wide and will be worn on the joint, attached with Velcro. News of the planned new patch was last night welcomed by charities and research bodies. Dr Nat Continue reading >>

Trials Bring Hope For World–first Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

Trials Bring Hope For World–first Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

Human trials of an innovative treatment for rheumatoid arthritis developed by The University of Queensland have begun in Brisbane. DEN-181, a vaccine-style treatment referred to as an 'immunotherapy', targets the underlying cause of the disease rather than treating its inflammatory symptoms. Patient trials at a clinical research facility at the Princess Alexandra Hospital began last week. UQ's Diamantina Institute research team, led by Professor Ranjeny Thomas, discovered the body's immune system could be 're-educated' to turn off, rather than react to a self-antigen responsible for autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis. This led to the development of DEN-181. DEN-181 is being commercialised by Dendright Pty Ltd, a start-up company of UniQuest, UQ's commercialisation company. UniQuest CEO Dr Dean Moss said the first-in-human trial was a momentous step towards making the breakthrough research discovery a treatment reality. "This is an important milestone in developing a new medicine for the millions of people affected by this debilitating disease which destroys joints, causes cardiovascular complications and can reduce life-span," he said. Professor Thomas, who is also Dendright's Chief Scientific Officer, said the phase 1b clinical trial was the bridge to bringing scientific data into clinical practice. "The study team will be monitoring and assessing DEN-181 safety and immunological response in patients and we thank the participating patients and referring rheumatologists," she said. UQ Advancement Director of Development and Philanthropy Andrew Pentland said Arthritis Queensland had been an important supporter of UQ's translational research and approaches to understanding disease biology since the early 1990s. "Arthritis Queensland has provided philanthropic fu Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First-of-its-kind Cancer Treatment

Fda Approves First-of-its-kind Cancer Treatment

Editors Note: The FDA approved a second CAR T-cell treatment for large B-cell lymphoma on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. It is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in adults. Go here to read more about the latest approved treatment. August 30, 2017 -- The FDA has for the first time approved a treatment that uses a patient’s own genetically modified cells to attack a type of leukemia, opening the door to what the agency calls "a new frontier" in medicine. The approval Wednesday allows a process known as CAR T-cell therapy to be used in children or young adults fighting an often fatal recurrence of the most common childhood cancer -- B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. And it clears the way for a new approach to fighting cancer by harnessing the body’s immune system -- a long-sought goal of medical researchers. “This is a dream come true,” says Henry Fung, MD, director of the Fox Chase Cancer Center-Temple University Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Program. “It’s now limited to one disease in children only, but that platform potentially can benefit a lot of different types of cancer patients, particularly blood cancer patients.” 'A New Frontier' FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, called the approval of the therapy -- brand named Kymriah -- a "new frontier in medical innovation." In a news conference on Wednesday, Gottlieb said the FDA had 76 active investigational new drug applications related to CAR T-cell products, and more than 500 for gene therapy products are being studied for a variety of ailments, ranging from genetic disorders to autoimmune diseases, diabetes, cancer, and HIV. "New technologies such as gene and cell therapies hold out the potential to transform medicine and create an inflection point in our ability to treat and even cure many i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Arthritis Breakthrough Treatment Symptoms Onset

Diabetes Arthritis Breakthrough Treatment Symptoms Onset

Perioperative Echocardiography: Interpreting and Applying the 2010 ASA Guidelines MaryBeth Brady MD. diabetic chocolate cake recipe agave medication diabetes best diet for Everything you need to know about does lantus insulin cause weight gain. Diabetes Arthritis Breakthrough Treatment Symptoms Onset introduction The research is quite clear – oral medications to treat type 2 diabetes do not alter the long-term progression of the disease. diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) an acute life-threatening complication of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. United States from 7.3% to 8.8% in the Netherlands and from 6.8% to 7.5% in What causes gestational diabetes? Before becoming pregnant the insulin you produced was just enough to satisfy your body’s requirements. In Type 1 diabetes people are treated with regular injections of insulin to control their blood sugar. 4 CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate Napoli Italy. Sometimes diabetic neuropathy does not lead to any symptoms (subclinical) or shows multiple symptoms. Diabetic people should have 1-3 grams per day of vitamin C. This is a toxin that can be moderately damaging to the liver and kidneys. The resulting surge in insulin production then causes blood sugar levels to eventually completely reverse and crash resulting in hypoglycemia or low blood sugar which can include symptoms such as blurred vision flushed skin the shakes and cravings for sweets. For the 25.8 million children and adults in the United States that have Diabetes apps are Diabetes Arthritis Breakthrough Treatment Symptoms Onset available for iOS and Android The vast majority of afflicted Americans however have Type 2 Diabetes in which the body makes insulin but This Android app also lets users log a long list of Diabetes Arthritis Breakthrough Treatment Symptoms Onset Ap Continue reading >>

More in diabetes