diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Arthritis

Arthritis On A Diabetes Blog

Arthritis On A Diabetes Blog

When it comes to living with both Type 1 diabetes and arthritis, I don’t experience the amount of pain and disability that burdens some of my favorite people in the DOC. Rick Phillips who deals with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis shared his story on my blog a couple of years ago. Rick tirelessly advocates for people with diabetes, but he often admits that arthritis negatively impacts his life much more than diabetes. Molly Schreiber has had Type 1 diabetes for 28 years. Her rheumatoid arthritis is a formidable opponent and she deals with the worst that RA can dish out. In general I am doing okay when it comes to living with arthritis. Except when I’m not…. ********* I am good at diabetes. I am bad at arthritis. I have had a tough summer. Although I was diagnosed diagnosed with inflammatory spondyloarthropathy over 10 years ago, my problems are peripheral. My hands hurt and my thumb joints are shot. In May I woke up with horrible heel and foot pain which continues to get worse despite following doctor’s orders. I don’t write about arthritis very often because I am a diabetes blogger. Type 1 diabetes is a constant in my life and I do little without taking diabetes into account. After 40+ years of T1, I have no major D-complications. At the same time diabetes is a “needy condition” that requires constant affirmation and is entrenched in my psyche. More than once I have mentioned that I deal with other inflammatory and autoimmune conditions in addition to diabetes. I once wrote about a skin problem called annulare granuloma and mentioned that I felt helpless in dealing with it because “When you have Type 1 diabetes, you get used to the idea that WHAT I DO MAKES A DIFFERENCE in my health.” I’ve never bothered writing about hypothyroidism Continue reading >>

Diabetes / Arthritis

Diabetes / Arthritis

Our podiatrists are qualified to thoroughly examine and treat those suffering from systemic diseases such as diabetes and arthritis. Such diseases can predispose sufferers to joint degeneration/deformity, circulatory and neurological deficits. Podiatric intervention can help to maintain the mobility of these individuals, enabling them to carry out a more active lifestyle. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Arthritis: Understanding The Connection

Diabetes & Arthritis: Understanding The Connection

Type 2 Diabetes & Arthritis Work in the garden one day, and you’re stiff the next. Take a long walk, and your knees ache. It’s just part of aging, right? Yes—but having type 2 diabetes may have something to do with it, too. People with type 2 diabetes are almost twice as likely as people who don’t have it to develop osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and happens when the cartilage that cushions the ends of your bones wears down. A 2013 study from the University of Erlangen in Nuremberg, Germany, followed more than 900 people with and without type 2 diabetes for two decades. They found that people with diabetes are more likely to develop arthritis severe enough to need joint-replacement surgery. Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent among people who are older and overweight, populations already at higher risk for arthritis. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 50 percent of adults 65 and older have been diagnosed with arthritis, and according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), almost 26 percent of adults 65 and older have type 2 diabetes. But that doesn’t fully explain why people with type 2 diabetes have achier knees and hips. When researchers accounted for both age and body mass index (BMI) in their data, the connection between blood glucose and joint health was still strong. The conclusion: Diabetes must have a direct effect on the joints. “Diabetes on its own is a predictor for severe osteoarthritis,” says the study’s author, George Schett, M.D. Linking the Two Scientists aren’t sure why diabetes contributes to joint damage, but they have theories. People with diabetes— especially those whose blood glucose levels stay too high over time—tend to have difficulty in healing, s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Goes Up In Rheumatoid Arthritis

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Goes Up In Rheumatoid Arthritis

There is a significant increase in the short-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients who have rheumatoid arthritis, a study found. The high disease activity is associated with derangements in glucose metabolism. Although rheumatoid arthritis is known to be an inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects joints, the condition is also associated with important comorbidities, Piero Ruscitti and colleagues in Italy noted. They pointed out that a significant number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are affected by type 2 diabetes and that cardiometabolic comorbidity remains underdiagnosed and undertreated in these patients. Studies suggest that certain proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1β, may be shared between rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes. The researchers presented the results of their prospective investigation into the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors, rheumatoid arthritis risk factors, and new-onset type 2 diabetes in a recent PLoS ONE article. The study The authors conducted a longitudinal observational cohort study to determine the risk of type 2 diabetes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; 439 consecutive patients were included. The results Type 2 diabetes predictors • Type 2 diabetes developed in 7.1% of subjects (31/439). • The combination of high blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, and high disease activity scores in 28 joints with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28[ESR]) proved to significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by logistic regression (x2=79.32, p<0.0001). • High blood pressure conferred 6.83 times the risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.18-21.34, p=0.001). • For patients who did not see reductions in t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Pets & Arthritis | Ask Dr. Joi

Diabetic Pets & Arthritis | Ask Dr. Joi

I get some great questions from clients. They inspire me with article ideas and keep me in tune with diabetic pet owners. I enjoy interacting with our readers, and sometimes the questions are worthy of a newsletter. I bet if one person has this question and takes the time to write me, there are likely lots of folks with a similar question. With today’s question, we talk about pet arthritis and diabetic pets! Hi Dr. Joi, I have a miniature schnauzer that is diabetic. She is on Vetsulin, 9 units 2 times a day. I am beginning to notice some arthritis symptoms in her legs. What type of medications are a possibility that won’t interfere with blood glucose levels? This is a fabulous question! Now before we talk particulars, know that I advise checking a blood glucose curve about a week after starting ANY medication or diet change for a diabetic pet. I was recently surprised by a “dry eye” medication that affected a pet’s blood glucose regulation. Luckily, those clients are super diligent and did as I recommend by checking a glucose curve a week after the new medication and caught the insulin resistance caused by the eye med. Now, this does not mean we necessarily stop the new medication! Sometimes we simply adjust the insulin dosage to accommodate the new medication. Next up, is there really arthritis or could there be some diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is not uncommon and if mild could clinically look like arthritis. The way to find out would be to have your veterinarian take some orthopedic radiographs and perform a thorough physical examination. Now let’s get to medications! Tramadol Tramadol is a mild narotic that we commonly use for arthritic pets. It can cause slight drowsiness, but I sometime hear just the opposite – that an arthritic pet is mo Continue reading >>

Atherosclerosis In Rheumatoid Arthritis Versus Diabetes

Atherosclerosis In Rheumatoid Arthritis Versus Diabetes

Abstract Objective— The extent to which atherosclerosis is accelerated in chronic inflammatory diseases is not established. We compared preclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis with diabetes mellitus, a known coronary heart disease equivalent. Methods and Results— Endothelial function, arterial stiffness, carotid intima-media thickness, and analysis of atheromatous plaques were examined in 84 rheumatoid arthritis patients without cardiovascular disease versus healthy controls matched for age, sex, and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, as well as in 48 diabetes patients matched for age, sex, and disease duration with 48 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis duration associated with arterial stiffening, whereas disease activity associated with carotid plaque vulnerability. All markers of preclinical atherosclerosis were significantly worse in rheumatoid arthritis compared to controls, whereas they did not differ in comparison to diabetes despite a worse cardiovascular risk factor profile in diabetics. Both diseases were associated independently with increased intima-media thickness; rheumatoid arthritis, but not diabetes, was independently associated with endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions— Preclinical atherosclerosis appears to be of equal frequency and severity in rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes of similar duration with differential impact of traditional risk factors and systemic inflammation. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in rheumatoid arthritis may need to be targeted as aggressively as in diabetes. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by excessive cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.1 The reasons remain unclear: although there is evidence for a significant cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor burden Continue reading >>

Silica, Diabetes, Arthritis

Silica, Diabetes, Arthritis

Show Summary Air Date: 7/9/2014 Silica, Diabetes, Arthritis - 2nd Episode (9462) Season 2014 Host: Doug Kaufmann Guests: Burt Goulding Karen Goulding Roby Mitchell Suzy Cohen Topics: How can i gain weight? Minerals & Supplements Prostate Cancer PSA Test Diabetes Fungus Supplements: Super Silica Cell Power Robynzymes Contact information Positive Power Nutrition (866) 722-3733 www.PositivePowerNutrition.com Continue reading >>

Arthritis And Diabetes

Arthritis And Diabetes

Tweet Arthritis is the term for conditions which cause inflammation of the joints. There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis, with a broad range of causes. Some of these forms of arthritis have close associations with certain types of diabetes. Arthritis can usually be treated to help reduce symptoms and slow progression of the condition. How common is arthritis? Arthritis is common, with an estimated 10 million people living with the condition in the UK alone. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting around 8 million in the UK. Whilst arthritis is most commonly associated with the elderly, a number of forms or arthritis can affect people of any age, including children. Types of arthritis Whilst there are many dozen forms or causes of arthritis, the following are some of the more common forms: Osteoarthritis - caused by damage to the cartilage in the joints Rheumatoid arthritis - an autoimmune form of arthritis Gout - caused by a build up of uric acid Ankylosing spondylitis - a form which usually causes stiffness in the spine Reactive arthritis - can result from certain infections causing red swollen joints Secondary arthritis - may occur following joint injury Juvenile arthritis - forms of arthritis that affect children Arthritis and diabetes Certain forms of arthritis may be more common in people with certain types of diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes have higher risks of developing osteoarthritis and gout, which is likely on account of the fact that obesity increases the risk of type 2 diabetes as well as these forms of arthritis. People with type 1 diabetes have significantly higher risks of also having rheumatoid arthritis. Both conditions are autoimmune diseases and research suggests that certain genes may increase the risk of Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Vs. Osteoarthritis And Diabetes

Rheumatoid Vs. Osteoarthritis And Diabetes

Though they both share connections with diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are related to the disease in different ways. Let's look at a few of the connections: Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, as is rheumatoid arthritis. In people who have type 1 diabetes, the body attacks the pancreas, the organ where insulin is made, just as RA attacks the synovial tissue lining the joints. Inflammation is the common culprit. Levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which often are high in people with rheumatoid arthritis, also are increased in those with type 1 diabetes. A study of people who had type 1 diabetes for longer than five years shows an increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), another inflammatory marker often elevated in people with inflammatory forms of arthritis. Inhibiting TNF-α with drugs such as adalimumab (Humira), etanercept (Enbrel) and infliximab (Remicade) is the goal of treating arthritis and related conditions. As scientists learn more about the roots of inflammation, some treatments for inflammatory arthritis may wind up helping to control other inflammation-related conditions. Researchers already are testing the possibilities. Reducing inflammation with Remicade improved insulin sensitivity in people who had inflammatory diseases and were insulin resistant, according to a small study published in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. And in a study of 70 people who had type 2 diabetes, the arthritis drug anakinra (Kineret) brought down the glucose level, improved function of the pancreas and decreased levels of CRP and IL-6. Osteoarthritis and Type 2 Diabetes Go above your ideal weight, and your lower-body joints feel the bu Continue reading >>

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) makes you about 50 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those without the autoimmune disease. Experts aren’t exactly sure what’s behind the connection, but many say that the link may be due to the inflammation that occurs with RA. “A lot of inflammation causes insulin resistance, which increases blood sugar levels,” says Scott Zashin, MD, a rheumatologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Being sedentary because of RA pain further increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. And any steroid drugs you take for RA can make it harder to control blood sugar. “When you have a lot of steroids in your body, your body makes glucose because it assumes you’re going to need it for some kind of ‘fight or flight’ response,” says Wayne Evron, MD, an endocrinologist and medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Pittsburgh. “But if you’re giving them to someone to control their RA, it can make their sugars higher.” The connection between type 2 diabetes and RA isn’t yet set in stone. “The data is kind of mixed,” Dr. Zashin warns. “There have been studies published showing an association between RA and diabetes, and some that haven’t shown an association.” Type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the pancreas, may also be a risk for people with RA. Though it used to be called juvenile diabetes, people can develop type 1 diabetes at any age. And because type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are both autoimmune diseases, they can occur together. Dr. Evron explains that they may be prevalent in families that tend to get autoimmune diseases And researchers have recently identified a gene named PTPN22 that can increas Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis (ra)

Type 1 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis (ra)

Question I have Type 1 diabetes and have recently been diagnosed with RA. What are the effects of DMARDs on diabetes/glucose levels or vice versa? Answer With type 1 Diabetes it is very important to maintain optimal control of your blood sugar. Some medications for RA can affect diabetes. The biggest offender is probably prednisone and other steroids. These will often raise blood sugar levels, sometimes even from a steroid injection into a joint. When doses of steroids are increased, more insulin or other medications may be needed to control blood sugar. The opposite can happen when steroids are discontinued or tapered. Patients with diabetes also have an increased risk of infection. Because many DMARD medications, especially biological agents, can increase the risk of infection, it is very importnat for patients with diabetes to be vigilant in preventing infection, and in attending to any fever, or localizing signs of infection (such as cough with phlegm, discolored nasal discharge, fever, skin redness, urinary burning) promptly by notifying a health care provider for treatment. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million people visit this site to learn about Arthritis. Unlike many health education websites, we produce our own content. Additionally, we do not accept advertising, paid guests posts, or charge for access. That’s where you come in. Your gift will allow us to reach more patients and healthcare professionals with this valuable information. Give Today Continue reading >>

Monitoring Diabetes In Patients With And Without Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Medicare Study

Monitoring Diabetes In Patients With And Without Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Medicare Study

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is a key predictor of mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Both RA and diabetes increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet understanding of how comorbid RA impacts the receipt of guideline-based diabetes care is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine how the presence of RA affected hemoglobin A1C (A1c) and lipid measurement in older adults with diabetes. Using a retrospective cohort approach, we identified beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes from a 5% random national sample of 2004 to 2005 Medicare patients (N = 256,331), then examined whether these patients had comorbid RA and whether they received guideline recommended A1c and lipid testing in 2006. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the effect of RA on receiving guideline recommended testing, adjusting for baseline sociodemographics, comorbidities and health care utilization. Two percent of diabetes patients had comorbid RA (N = 5,572). Diabetes patients with comorbid RA were more likely than those without RA to have baseline cardiovascular disease (such as 17% more congestive heart failure), diabetes-related complications including kidney disease (19% higher), lower extremity ulcers (77% higher) and peripheral vascular disease (32% higher). In adjusted models, diabetes patients with RA were less likely to receive recommended A1c testing (odds ratio (OR) 0.84, CI 0.80 to 0.89) than those without RA, but were slightly more likely to receive lipid testing (OR 1.08, CI 1.01 to 1.16). In older adults with diabetes, the presence of comorbid RA predicted lower rates of A1c testing but slightly improved lipid testing. Future research should examine strategies to improve A1c testing in patients with diabetes and RA, in light of increased Continue reading >>

Hope Of Cure For Arthritis, Ms And Diabetes As Stanford Makes Stem Cell Transplants Safe

Hope Of Cure For Arthritis, Ms And Diabetes As Stanford Makes Stem Cell Transplants Safe

Hundreds of thousands of people could be cured of autoimmune diseases like arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and lupus after scientists discovered how to make stem cell transplants safe. Autoimmune diseases trigger the body into attacking itself but transplants of bone marrow stem cells from healthy donors have been shown to reset the immune system and reverse fatal conditions. However doctors have been reluctant to carry out the treatments as before the healthy cells can be given, the patient must be stripped of the malfunctioning immune system using radiotherapy or chemotherapy. If and when this is accomplished, it will be a whole new era in disease treatment and regenerative medicineProf Irving Weissman, Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine In 20 per cent of cases the patient dies from this stripping procedure and usually surgeons will not attempt a transplant unless there is no other hope. But Stanford University has now shown it is possible to remove the defective immune system using a new technique which encourages the body to eat up the malfunctioning blood cells. So far, researchers have proven it works in animals but are hopeful that it will also be effective in humans. "If it works in humans like it did in mice, we would expect that the risk of death from blood stem cell transplant would drop from 20 per cent to effectively zero," Dr Judith Shizuru, professor of medicine at Stanford. "The chemotherapy and radiation used for transplant damage DNA and can cause both immediate problems and long-term damage to many tissues in the body. “Among the many known toxic side effects, these treatments can cause damage to the liver, reproductive organs and brain, potentially causing seizures and impairing neurological development and g Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Ogtt Study

Prevalence Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Ogtt Study

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by an excess of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, estimated to be at least 50% greater when compared to the general population. Although the widespread diffusion of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) awareness, there is still a significant proportion of patients with T2DM that remain undiagnosed. Aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in RA patients. For the present study, 100 consecutive nondiabetic RA patients were recruited. Age- and sex-matched subjects with noninflammatory diseases (osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia) were used as controls. After overnight fasting, blood samples were obtained for laboratory evaluation including serum glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies (ACPA). A standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose was performed and blood samples were collected at time 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, for measurement of plasma glucose concentrations. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (9/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.49), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (19/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.17), and concomitant IFG/IGT (5/100 vs 9/100, P = 0.27) was similar between groups, whereas the prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in RA patients (10/100 vs 2/100, P = 0.02). In a logistic regression analysis, increasing age (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.028–1.245, P = 0.01) and disease duration (OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.210–2.995, P = 0.005) were both associated with Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Juvenile Arthritis In Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Prevalence Of Juvenile Arthritis In Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Large epidemiological studies of autoimmune diseases in children are lacking due to the rarity of these diseases early in life as well as their clinical heterogeneity. Now a new study of a very large group of children in Germany and Austria reports that there’s a clear increased prevalence of JIA in youth with type 1 diabetes compared with the general pediatric population.1 The study estimates that arthritis occurs in 193 out of 100,000 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, a pediatric prevalence rate that exceeds those reported in previous German studies (15 to 20 out of 100,000) or compared with the European average (28 out of 100,000).2-4 The study doesn’t address the mechanisms involved, but multiple genetic and environmental factors likely interact with each other to confer susceptibility to these disorders. “Both type 1 diabetes and juvenile idiopathic arthritis are considered to be autoimmune diseases, thus the observation that arthritis occurs more commonly in patients with diabetes is not too surprising,” says Mara L. Becker, MD, MSCE, who wasn’t involved with the study. Dr Becker is an associate professor of pediatrics and the division director of rheumatology at Children’s Mercy, Kansas City, Mo. “However, one has to be cautious of the generalizability of these findings since this population was restricted to 2 European countries. Thus, the findings may not be applicable to other geographic areas with different environmental and genetic factors at play.” The study included 54,911 children under 16 years of age who had type 1 diabetes, recorded from 1995 up to September 2013.1 Investigators compared the patients with and without JIA in terms of body mass index (BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin dose, hypertension and d Continue reading >>

More in diabetes