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The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these videos because they’re actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their viewers with personal stories and high-quality information. Nominate your favorite video by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is a chronic disease caused by improper insulin function. This leads to overly high blood sugar. The three types of diabetes include type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Prediabetes, where blood sugar is high but not over the diabetic threshold, increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. People of all ages, ethnicities and sizes can get diabetes. Nearly 50 percent of U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes, according to a 2015 study. This includes people living with diabetes who haven’t yet received an official diagnosis. Receiving a diabetes diagnosis can feel shocking or overwhelming. The illness has some serious potential complications, such as blindness and amputation. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Treatment often requires immediate and significant lifestyle adjustments. However, with careful management, you can still enjoy a varied diet and active lifestyle. There are plenty of people out there who refuse to let diabetes stop them from thriving. If you’re seeking some inspiration or information, look no further than these videos. 7 Best Superfoods for Diabetes - Saturday Strategy A healthy diet plays a huge role in managing diabetes. Drew Canole, CEO of fitlife.tv, shares insights into superfoods that help keep diabetes in check. Canole says these superfoods will help you regulate glucose levels and lower insulin levels. One such superfood is the Moringa leaf. He says studies have indicated it lowers blood sugar levels by up to 29 percent. Why not give his diabetes-bu Continue reading >>

Protein Lounge - Diabetes

Protein Lounge - Diabetes

Type II Diabetes is a disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. It is [...] 11511 times viewed , Duration 2.32 minutes Diabetes, Hyperglycemia, Type II Diabetes, High sugar level Type II Diabetes is a disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. It is the most common form of diabetes, in which either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas, which is needed to convert sugar and other food into energy. When we eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When one has diabetes, the body either doesnt make enough insulin or cant use its own insulin properly. This causes sugars to build up too high in the blood. Thus, cells may be starved for energy. Over time, high blood glucose levels may hurt eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. This animation shows a detailed comparison between a normal person and a person with Type II Diabetic condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes - type 1; Diabetes - type 2; Diabetes - gestational; Type 1 diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; Gestational diabetes; Diabetes mellitus Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. Causes Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to control blood sugar. Diabetes can be caused by too little insulin, resistance to insulin, or both. To understand diabetes, it is important to first understand the normal process by which food is broken down and used by the body for energy. Several things happen when food is digested: A sugar called glucose enters the bloodstream. Glucose is a source of fuel for the body. An organ called the pancreas makes insulin. The role of insulin is to move glucose from the bloodstream into muscle, fat, and liver cells, where it can be stored or used as fuel. People with diabetes have high blood sugar because their body cannot move sugar from the blood into muscle and fat cells to be burned or stored for energy, and/or because their liver makes too much glucose and releases it into the blood. This is because either: Their pancreas does not make enough insulin Their cells do not respond to insulin normally Both of the above There are two major types of diabetes. The causes and risk factors are different for each type: Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it is most often diagnosed in children, teens, or young adults. In this disease, the body makes little or no insulin. This is because the pancreas cells that make insulin stop working. Daily injections of insulin are needed. The exact cause is unknown. Type 2 diabetes is much more common. It most often occurs in adulthood, but because of high obesity rates, children and teens are now being diagnosed with this disease. Some people with type 2 di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk - Care Line Animation - The House London

Diabetes Uk - Care Line Animation - The House London

Michael founded The House in 2009 and is responsible for creative output, managing the team and keeping our clients smiling. He is an experienced designer having over 10 years experience working in London and Hong Kong andhas helpedorganisations of all sizes likethe NHS, MTV, Diabetes UK, Boots, Heineken, Global Goals and Nokia to smaller start-ups like Olive Branch, Mixcloud and Readwave. Michaelhelps clients find their full potential, taking them step-by-step through theirprojects in partnership with them. Graduating from Central Saint Martins and the University of West of England, with a time spent studying in Hong Kong, Michael has the training and skills required for any big brand name. Past companies Michael has worked at include Lloyd Northover, Ingredient, Getty Images and Root Design. When not dreaming up creative and commercially viable ideas Michael loves to gain inspiration from travel (35 countries and counting), practicing Tai Chi and Yoga, cycling to and from work, running (2 marathons down and a few to go) and photographing the wonderful things he sees. Fancy a chat? Email [email protected] Continue reading >>

Animation: Type 2 Diabetes

Animation: Type 2 Diabetes

View our animation of how foods containing carbohydrate are normally digested by your body into glucose. See the part insulin plays in helping glucose to enter your fat and muscle cells for energy production or storage. Then scroll down to view what happens in people with type 2 diabetes. This animation requires the latest version of Adobe Flash Player. Use the ‘Next’ navigation button to move through the scenes. You can also use the ‘Play again’ and ‘Back’ navigation buttons to review scenes and to move backwards. People with type 2 diabetes usually have a combination of problems: the pancreas does not produce enough insulin; and the body's fat and muscle cells are resistant to the insulin. This means that insulin does not do its normal job of helping the cells to process glucose and make energy or store the energy for use later. The cells are starved of energy as the glucose remains in the bloodstream. The glucose builds up in the bloodstream leading to what's known as a ‘high blood sugar’ or ‘high blood glucose’ level. myDr References 1. Mayo Clinic [website]. Type 2 diabetes: causes (updated 2009, Jun 13). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 31) 2. Diabetes Australia - NSW [website]. Type 2 diabetes (updated 2009, Jun 23). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 31) 3. Merck Manual of Medical Information - Second Home Edition [website]. Diabetes mellitus (updated 2008, June). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 31) 4. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse [website]. Diabetes overview (updated 2008, Nov). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 31) Continue reading >>

Animation: Type 1 Diabetes

Animation: Type 1 Diabetes

View our animation of how foods containing carbohydrate are normally digested by your body into glucose. See the part that insulin plays in helping glucose to enter your fat and muscle cells for energy production or storage. Then scroll down to see what happens in people with type 1 diabetes. This animation requires the latest version of Adobe Flash Player. Use the ‘Next’ navigation button to move through the scenes. You can also use the ‘Play again’ and ‘Back’ navigation buttons to review scenes and to move backwards. In people with type 1 diabetes the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin — the beta cells — have been destroyed. This means that the pancreas can't produce insulin, so there's no insulin to unlock the glucose channels in the body's fat and muscle cells. With the glucose channels locked, no glucose can enter the fat and muscle cells where it is needed for fuel to make energy, or for storage for later energy requirements. Glucose then builds up in the bloodstream leading to what's known as a ‘high blood sugar’ or ‘high blood glucose’ level. People with type 1 diabetes have to inject insulin several times every day to allow glucose to enter the cells. This should bring their blood glucose levels within a healthy range. myDr References 1. Mayo Clinic [website]. Type 1 diabetes: causes (updated 2009, Jun 13). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 25) 2. Diabetes Australia - NSW [website]. Type 1 diabetes (updated 2009, Jun 23). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 25) 3. Merck Manual of Medical Information - Second Home Edition [website]. Diabetes mellitus (updated 2008, June). Available at: (accessed 2010, May 25) Continue reading >>

File:3d Medical Animation Still Of Type One Diabetes.jpg

File:3d Medical Animation Still Of Type One Diabetes.jpg

File:3D medical animation still of Type One Diabetes.jpg Size of this preview: 800 450 pixels . Other resolutions: 320 180 pixels | 640 360 pixels | 1,024 576 pixels | 1,280 720 pixels | 1,920 1,080 pixels . Original file (1,920 1,080 pixels, file size: 1.39 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons . The description on its description page there is shown below. Commons is a freely licensed media file repository. You can help . Description3D medical animation still of Type One Diabetes.jpg English: 3D medical animation still of Type 1 Diabetes showing lower amount of insulin production in a diabetic patient. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. to share to copy, distribute and transmit the work attribution You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). share alike If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. BY-SA 4.0 Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 truetrue This file, which was originally posted to , was reviewed on by the administrator or reviewer Leoboudv , who confirmed that it was available there under the stated license on that date. Continue reading >>

[animation] Autoimmunity, Inflammation And Diabetes

[animation] Autoimmunity, Inflammation And Diabetes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn't open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator Opening Apple Books.If Apple Books doesn't open, click the Books app in your Dock.Progress Indicator iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection. We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To download and subscribe to [Animation] Autoimmunity, inflammation and Diabetes by Drew Berry, Etsuko Uno, Maja Divjak, wehi.tv, get iTunes now. Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now. [Animation] Autoimmunity, inflammation and Diabetes By Drew Berry, Etsuko Uno, Maja Divjak, wehi.tv To listen to an audio podcast, mouse over the title and click Play. Open iTunes to download and subscribe to podcasts. This animation describes the process of inflammation in type 2 diabetes via a unique structure called the inflammasome. Over time, this process damages the pancreas, eventually leading to decreased insulin secretion and inability to control blood glucose levels. Chronic inflammatory 'lifestyle diseases' such as T2D are rapidly increasing in the western world and will pose a huge health burden in future. Continue reading >>

By Support Of Oryx Gtl Animation On The Rights Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Wins Telly Award For Film/video

By Support Of Oryx Gtl Animation On The Rights Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Wins Telly Award For Film/video

By support of ORYX GTL Animation on the rights of children with Type 1 Diabetes wins Telly Award for Film/Video An animated series entitled Rashid: Living With Type 1 Diabetes aimed to uphold the rights of children with Type 1 diabetes has been awarded a Telly Award for Film/Video at the 37th Annual Telly Awards. The winning animated series consisting of twelve animated shorts in high-end 3D animation, voiced in Arabic and English, aims to uphold the rights of children and bring awareness of children with Type 1 diabetes. The series was created by Chocolate Moose Media for the Qatar Diabetes Association (QDA), sponsored by ORYX GTL. The series is available for free viewing, downloading and use by any organization or person. The Telly Awards receives over 13,000 entries. The Telly Awards is the premier award honoring the finest film and video productions. The Telly mission is to strengthen the visual arts community by inspiring, promoting, and supporting creativity. The series covers several important topics on children living with diabetes including creating awareness on: a proactive mind-set of understanding the needs of children with open discussion and empathy; a policy of allowing children to check their blood glucose level whenever/wherever necessary; understanding insulin what it is, how it is taken, why it is necessary; children could have very serious health and well-being consequences if their needs are not attended to urgently; children who feel unwell should be tended to immediately, with appropriate measures; eliminating discrimination and prejudice against students; an open mind-set to letting children drink water, rest or use the bathroom; diabetes is a health condition and has nothing to do with the age, gender, culture or ethnicity of the child affected Continue reading >>

Video: How Diabetes Affects Your Blood Sugar

Video: How Diabetes Affects Your Blood Sugar

Your body uses glucose for energy. Glucose metabolism requires insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. Here's how normal glucose metabolism works, and what happens when you have diabetes — a disease where your body either can't produce enough insulin or it can't use insulin properly. The food you eat consists of three basic nutrients: carbohydrates, protein and fat. During digestion, chemicals in your stomach break down carbohydrates into glucose, which is absorbed into your bloodstream. Your pancreas responds to the glucose by releasing insulin. Insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into your body's cells. When the glucose enters your cells, the amount of glucose in your bloodstream falls. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn't secrete insulin — which causes a buildup of glucose in your bloodstream. Without insulin, the glucose can't get into your cells. If you have type 2 diabetes, your pancreas secretes less insulin than your body requires because your body is resistant to its effect. With both types of diabetes, glucose cannot be used for energy, and it builds up in your bloodstream — causing potentially serious health complications. Continue reading >>

Does Prediabetes Mean That You’ll Get Diabetes?

Does Prediabetes Mean That You’ll Get Diabetes?

Is Prediabetes even a thing? It hasn’t been very long since doctors started using terms like ‘prediabetes’ or ‘borderline diabetes’, to indicate the state of a person during the period before he/she becomes plainly and clinically diabetic. Unfortunately, the terminology is quite vague as it doesn’t clearly state anything. A person diagnosed with prediabetes is, in all probability, likely to ask whether it means he is going to have Type 2 diabetes, or if the diagnosis implies that he’ll definitely get Type 2 diabetes, or wonder whether it suggests that he is at no risk at all. The answer to all of these queries is No. Prediabetes condition simply means that you don’t have Type 2 diabetes at the moment, but you do need to act now if you want to avoid it. The “pre” in prediabetes can make it seem like a harmless condition in comparison to diabetes. However, a review published in November 2016 in BMJ found that prediabetes is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even when the lowest thresholds were used to diagnose prediabetes. Doctors have even proposed to changing the name “prediabetes” to “stage 1 diabetes” to highlight the seriousness of the condition. But there is another set of people who argue that the term is too broad to worry about and even take medication for because the condition may never turn into diabetes at all. Among international organizations, there is no consensus on the definition of prediabetes, but most use blood glucose levels to determine risk. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has a lower threshold for diagnosing prediabetes than most other organizations. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends not using the term in order “to avoid any stigma associated with diabetes and the fact th Continue reading >>

3d Medical Animation Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

3d Medical Animation Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

3D Medical Animation Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Written by Ashish Khera on September 16, 2015 The modern era of fast food generation and take away lifestyle makes our body more prone to nutritional imbalances. These misbalances come in the form of metabolic diseases, which require immediate attention. Precautionary methods should be adopted to avoid contraction of complex diseases in the future. Metabolic diseases are more common in the 21st century due to our lifestyle choices. One of the dangerous and serious disease associated with this is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is caused due to a metabolic disorder of the carbohydrate metabolism. Carbohydrate metabolism is dependent on the pancreatic hormone insulin, which converts sugar and starch into energy needed for our day-to-day activities. Generally, the diabetes mellitus is divided into two types - Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus.Type 1 diabetes mellitus is more common among children and young adults. It was also popularly known as juvenile diabetes as majority of cases reported were children. In case of Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas are unable to produce enough insulin and therefore requires appropriate medication to maintain insulin level in the body. Hence, this type of diabetes is also known as insulin-dependent diabetes. The main signs and symptom associated with diabetes mellitus are increased thirst, polyuria, extreme hunger, unintended weight loss, fatigue, general weakness and fungal infections of the yeast. The Type 1 diabetes mellitus is caused mainly by the loss of insulin producing beta cells of the islets of Langerhans especially by the environmental factors such as viral infection. Also, genetics play an important role in maintaining insulin production. The 3D medical animation illustrates ho Continue reading >>

3d Animation For The Education Of Young (4-8 Years Old) Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Their Families

3d Animation For The Education Of Young (4-8 Years Old) Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Their Families

3D animation for the education of young (4-8 years old) children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families D Neumann1, B Vavrinka2, J Jones3, C Gallacher3, I Craigie3 & M Donaldson3 1University Hospital, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; 2Film School Zlin, Zlin, Czech Republic; 3Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, UK. Introduction: Education of young children with type 1 diabetes mellitus is challenging. We report a collaboration between a hospital diabetology team and a young, diabetic 3D animator. Materials and methods: This resulted in a novel education tool a series of five 3D cartoons lasting 56 min linked by a diabetic diary. Part 1 describes normal glucose metabolism in a healthy body. Part 2 describes diabetes and DKA. Parts 35 deal with: initial intravenous therapy and paediatric intensive care unit procedures aimed at reassuring children; the switch to subcutaneous therapy; biochemical measurements and the daily diabetic plan. We used easily comprehensible symbolism for young children with colour-coding used throughout: insulin is represented as spoons, which are needed for the cells to eat sugars, fat looks like spaghetti and cells spit out the ends ketone bodies. The colour coding reflects the colour coding used for medical products, for example ketone bodies are coloured pink in the films and a positive result on a urinalysis strip would also show pink with ketonuria. This emphasises the link between the films and the real world experience of the children. In their diaries children use the stickers with happy and sad cells from the cartoons to label glycaemic results and their bodys reaction. The animation includes voices and songs of cells to make learning from the films more memorable. The diary includes scenes from the films which can be col Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes

Facts About Diabetes

More than 346 million people worldwide have diabetes. Diabetes is predicted to become the 7th leading cause of death in the world by the year 2030. There are 2 major forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production and Type 2 diabetes results from the body's ineffective use of insulin. A third type of diabetes is Gestational diabetes.This type is characterized by hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, which has first appeared or been recognized during pregnancy. According to 3Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women with diabetes must plan childbearing carefully. It is especially important to keep blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible before and during pregnancy, to protect both mother and baby. The risk of heart disease, the most common complication of diabetes, is more serious among women than men. Among people with diabetes who have had a heart attack, women have lower survival rates and a poorer quality of life than men. Women with diabetes have a shorter life expectancy than women without diabetes, and women are at greater risk of blindness from diabetes than men. Death rates for women aged 25 - 44 years with diabetes are more than 3 times the rate for women without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes. Type 2 accounts for around 90% of all diabetes worldwide. Reports of type 2 diabetes in children - previously rare - have increased worldwide. In some countries, it accounts for almost half of newly diagnosed cases in children and adolescents. Cardiovascular disease is responsible for between 50% and 80% of deaths in people with diabetes. Cardiovascular disease remains to be one of the leading causes of non-communicable diseases (NCD) deaths with 17 million deaths or 48% of Continue reading >>

Phillip Schofield & The Kitchen Give Charity Diabetes Uk A Refresh.

Phillip Schofield & The Kitchen Give Charity Diabetes Uk A Refresh.

Phillip Schofield & The Kitchen give charity Diabetes UK a refresh. The Kitchen recently collaborated with Diabetes UK, to help refresh their flagship informative video 'What is Diabetes'. Diabetes is the fastest growing health crisis of our time, affecting more people than any other serious health condition in the UK; more than dementia and cancer combined. Despite this, there is currently no known cure for any type of diabetes. The purpose of the project was simply to explain diabetes to a mixtureof people who are new to the condition or without much understanding of it, or with language barriers. The video had tooffer a simple, straightforward explanation of what diabetes is and reflect the refreshed brand and tone of voice of Diabetes UK. As a result the script and animation were tailored accordingly. As much as the video had to be engaging and on-brand, if the information wasn't just right then there would have been no point in making the video at all. The charity needed to be seen as a trusted and reliableplace for people to access expert support and information. Therefore the video needed to talk about diabetes in a clear and consistent way, and the chosen creative concept needed to reflect this. The Kitchen worked with the charity to develop a script and storyboard ahead of the production of visuals. The original video was split into three separate videos, no longer than two minutes each, featuring Diabetes UK's friendly bunch of characters that have become synonymous with their charity. National treasure Phillip Schofield, who has a very personal relationship with diabetes as his mum and brother both live with the condition, let his voice to the videos. The whole process took six months with an end product of three clear, short, engaging new videos to help peo Continue reading >>

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