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Diabetes And Work Performance

Diabetes & Discrimination: At Work

Diabetes & Discrimination: At Work

Depending on your line of work and the environment and people you work with, deciding how much of your life with diabetes you reveal can be challenging. Even the people we’re with Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. can still continue to have many misconceptions or concerns or false ideas of what it means to live with diabetes. The result? Diabetes discrimination at the workplace. If you feel as though you’re being discriminated against in the workplace, visit the American Diabetes Association’s page with resources on how to ensure you receive fair treatment and rights as an employee with diabetes. We asked the Diabetes Daily Facebook community what kind of discrimination they’ve experienced at work, and here’s what they had to to say: “In my old job my manager told me to do my injections in the toilet, that people didn’t need to see it like it was something to be ashamed of. I handed my notice in not long after that.” – Jen “In an interview, an employer asked me if I thought I would miss a lot of work because of my diabetes! It was a dentist’s office. I told him I had never taken any sick days for diabetes OR any other illnesses…cold, flu, heart attack!!! I was in my 20’s and very naive. I just answered his questions. I didn’t get the job because he ‘just couldn’t trust’ that I wouldn’t get sick and miss work. Instead I got a job in the same building with another doctor who appreciated my work to the point he shared his baseball box seat tickets with me. Thought about it over the years. I’m 59 and still here. I wonder where that goofy dentist is?” – Judy “Some of my co-workers loathed me because I had to take a leave of absence. I wasn’t being a team player. So glad I’m out of that place….” – Mary Jane “Th Continue reading >>

Diabetes And How It Can Affect A Person At Work

Diabetes And How It Can Affect A Person At Work

Many conditions can cause health issues in the workplace and long-term absence from work. One condition that is becoming increasingly prevalent is diabetes. Diabetes is the result of the body being unable to break down glucose into energy, either because the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to metabolise glucose or because the insulin produced by the body doesn’t work properly. Figures from Diabetes UK show that since 1996 the number of people with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. By 2025, it is estimated that five million people will have diabetes in the UK. Types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes: Develops when the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed so the body can’t maintain normal glucose levels. This accounts for only around 10% of all cases of diabetes and is controlled through regular, life-long insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes: This occurs when the body is not making enough insulin and is most common in middle aged or older people. However, it is becoming increasingly common in younger, overweight people and is often linked to lifestyle choices. To some extent, type 2 diabetes can be controlled through diet and exercise, although many people with type 2 diabetes will require medication to control glucose levels. Diabetes – warning signs Certain symptoms can suggest the onset of diabetes, and these include: feeling very thirsty; urinating more frequently, particularly at night; increased hunger; feeling tired; weight loss or loss of muscle bulk; slow-healing cuts or wounds; blurred vision; frequent b0uts of thrush. Risk factors for diabetes Type 1 diabetes: Family history: Having a parent or sibling with the condition. Genetics: The presence of certain genes indicates an increased risk of d Continue reading >>

Tips To Help Manage Diabetes At Work

Tips To Help Manage Diabetes At Work

Millions of people with diabetes refuse to let it get in the way of their careers, and there's no reason they should. Diabetes may present some working day challenges. Knowing how to manage these is the key. The more you know about your diabetes, and the more you know about controlling your blood glucose levels, the better off you'll be. The more you know, the better prepared you will be to deal with any work situations that arise, including explaining your condition to others if you decide to. People with diabetes have legal protection in the workplace under disability discrimination laws, even though people with diabetes may not describe their condition as a disability. Some jobs have special health rules meaning diabetes would need to be disclosed. However, most jobs have no legal requirement for this. Deciding whether to tell employers or colleagues is a matter of personal choice. Here are some tips and advice on diabetes in the workplace. Start your working day the right way Everyone is short of time in the morning but you should never miss breakfast, particularly on a working day. When you have diabetes, depending on your medication, skipping breakfast can lead to dangerously low glucose levels. Not only can missing breakfast affect your health but it can also affect safety and performance at work. A healthy breakfast will help set the tone for a productive working day. It’s also important to have a healthy lunch in mind. This will help your energy levels and concentration stay high throughout the day. You may choose to take a packed lunch and snacks to work. This way you know exactly what you’re going to be eating and you can eat it whenever you are ready to. If you choose to buy your lunch, whether the food comes from a sandwich bar, work canteen or cafe, th Continue reading >>

How Might Diabetes Affect My Ability To Work, And Are There Certain Jobs I Should Consider Over Others?

How Might Diabetes Affect My Ability To Work, And Are There Certain Jobs I Should Consider Over Others?

Question: How might diabetes affect my ability to work, and are there certain jobs I should consider over others? Answer: People that have diabetes can do almost every job that anyone who doesn't have diabetes can do. For example, people who have diabetes perform at the very highest level are professional baseball players, professional football players, politicians, a number of occupations. So the fact that you have diabetes, or the fact that you take insulin, doesn't disqualify you from almost all professions. However, you have to take into consideration your diabetes when you're conducting your work. For example, people who have diabetes often have to administer insulin or check their blood glucose while they're at their job. So this needs to be done in a discrete fashion where they're comfortable doing that. Some patients that have diabetes are comfortable with everyone in their workplace knowing they have diabetes. Other patients only like to have certain people know that they have diabetes. I think it's important that someone at your place of work know that you have diabetes in case if you had hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, that they would know that you were diabetic and they could take the appropriate steps. By law there are certain jobs that people with diabetes and who take insulin can't perform. For example, one can't be a commercial airline pilot and there's certain restrictions in terms of driving commercial vehicles such as long distance trucks and buses. But other than that, most jobs can be done very well by a person with diabetes. Next: Does My Employer Have To Know About My Diabetes Before Or While I Am Employed? Previous: How Does Diabetes Affect Male Hormones? Continue reading >>

This Article Can Help You Receive Fair Treatment In The Workplace

This Article Can Help You Receive Fair Treatment In The Workplace

Under the Americans With Disabilities Act, employers, employment agencies, labor unions, and state and local governments cannot discriminate against individuals with disabilities. People with diabetes are covered by this law. Here's what to know. Talking with your employer about diabetes According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, an employer may not ask you whether you have diabetes or questions about diabetes treatments before making a hiring decision. After you get the job, your employer may require you to undergo a medical examination as long as your coworkers are subject to the same requirement. Also, if you disclose to the employer that you have diabetes, he or she may ask follow-up questions and require you to receive an additional medical exam related to your condition. Many job candidates voluntarily offer information about their diabetes. With this approach, you can provide information to your employer or co-workers about steps to take in an emergency. For example, what should they do if you faint from hypoglycemia? Your employer is also required to make reasonable accommodations for you. Know that your diabetes does not provide grounds for termination if you can safely and effectively perform the job. Reasonable accommodations Workplace accommodation needs vary from person to person and from one workplace to another. Some people with diabetes may not need accommodations. There is no list of required accommodations under ADA guidelines for those with diabetes. However, there are guidelines used to form those accommodations. For example, to manage your diabetes in the workplace, you may require extra time during the day to check your blood glucose levels or eat a snack. Speaking with your employer about these needs may prompt him or her to ad Continue reading >>

Can You Work If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Work If You Have Diabetes?

This is the question that Aidan sent to The Diabetes Council last week: Can you work if you have diabetes? Of course you can work if you have diabetes, or can you? Seemingly this is a simple question, but there are three answers: Yes No Maybe – you can work if you have diabetes by fighting the system Careers that you cannot have with diabetes There are some careers that preclude you from working as a person with diabetes. These careers are not open to people with diabetes who are taking insulin. For example, if you have Type 1 diabetes, you are not allowed to pilot a plane commercially in the United States, no matter how well controlled your diabetes is. The FAA currently will not allow it. However, if you want to pilot a plane in Canada or the United Kingdom, there are regulations set up that allow persons with Type 1 diabetes who are in good control of their diabetes to pilot a plane commercially. We have looked at a lot of different careers at The Diabetes Council. We have looked at whether or not you can be in the military with diabetes, be a firefighter or a law enforcement officer with diabetes, astronaut, work as an EMT/paramedic, a long-distance truck driver, or be a pilot with diabetes. Soon, we will look at whether or not you can be a flight attendant with diabetes. Please read the articles above to find out what the specifics of working in these careers with diabetes are, and what kind of rules and regulations you must follow. The careers we have looked at so far all have certain rules and regulations that apply to people with diabetes. These rules and regulations are put into place to ensure the safety of the employee with diabetes, and also the safety of the general public. For example, a pilot with poorly controlled diabetes who has a low blood sugar cou Continue reading >>

Workplace Checkup: Keeping Patients With Diabetes Employed And Safe On The Job

Workplace Checkup: Keeping Patients With Diabetes Employed And Safe On The Job

Fred is job hunting. Since being laid off 3 years ago as a result of the recession, he has worked in a series of temporary jobs that have kept food on his table but provided no health insurance, vacation, or other benefits. Fred is just like millions of other unemployed or underemployed people who desire a fulfilling job with fair pay. The only difference? Fred has diabetes. Because of this, Fred must find out about more than just the job duties, dress code, and pay structure of potential employers. He must also seek information about whether he will be able to manage his diabetes on the job and what policies potential employers have for hiring and accommodating workers with disabilities. Fred tries to get this information second-hand because he does not yet want to reveal his diabetes and risk lessening his chances of getting a job. Fred’s situation probably sounds familiar to many of the more than 18 million Americans who have been diagnosed and live with diabetes today.1 Employment provides many benefits to people with diabetes, not the least of which is the income necessary to afford diabetes supplies. Such benefits, in turn, allow workers to manage diabetes so they can remain healthy enough to work. But employment is not always trouble free for people with diabetes. Data show that lost productivity at work, absenteeism, and even early retirement contribute indirectly to the enormous costs (not only to individuals, but also to society) of diabetes.2 Just as damaging can be discrimination on the job because of diabetes. Diabetes discrimination comes in many forms and includes not only the failure to hire or promote a person because of diabetes, but also the failure to provide an employee the reasonable accommodations necessary to manage diabetes on the job, as well Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is A Disability

Diabetes Is A Disability

Required Accommodations for Employees with Diabetes The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) prohibits discrimination against employees with disabilities by state and local governmental entities and by private employers with fifteen (15) or more employees. The ADA was amended in 2008 to make it easier for an employee seeking protection under the ADA to establish that he or she has a disability. American with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (“ADAAA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12102. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) enforces the provisions of the ADA and the ADAAA. As diabetes becomes more common in the United States, it is important for employees and employers to understand the application of the ADA as it pertains to employees with diabetes. Diabetes is a disability under the ADA when it “substantially limits one or more of a person’s major life activities.” 42 U.S.C. § 12102. The amendments and the EEOC’s final regulations have made it clear that diabetes is among several listed impairments that “virtually always” substantially limit a major life activity. 29 C.F.R. §§ 1630.2(j)(3)(iii) and (j)(4)(iv). In other words, diabetes is almost always considered a disability under the ADA. Employers must tread carefully when diabetes is suspected or where an employee has indicated directly that they have diabetes. Asking the Employee About Diabetes or Requiring a Medical Exam For various reasons, employers may suspect that an employee has diabetes and want confirmation. However, the ADA strictly limits the circumstances in which an employer can ask about an employee’s medical condition or require an employee to submit to a medical exam. The circumstances in which an employer can ASK about suspected diabetes include: (A) where the Continue reading >>

Court Oks Termination Of Diabetic Employee For Misconduct

Court Oks Termination Of Diabetic Employee For Misconduct

By Elizabeth Bowersox | March 20, 2017 | Articles A recent federal appeals court decision case upheld an employers termination of a diabetic employee for misconduct, despite the employees argument that her poor work performance was a result of low-blood sugar. Janna DeWitt worked as a customer service representative in a call center for Southwestern Bell Telephone Company. She had Type I diabetes, and if her blood sugar levels were low, she would experience fatigue, lethargy, confusion and poor coordination. Throughout her employment at Southwestern Bell, the company allowed Ms. DeWitt to take breaks to eat or drink to raise her blood sugar levels as needed. If she was on a break, she did not need to answer customer phone calls. Ms. DeWitt took intermittent FMLA leave in 2009 and early 2010 for health problems related to her diabetes. Although Southwestern Bell frowned upon employees taking FMLA leave, Ms. DeWitt was allowed to use the leave and to return to work. In January 2010, Ms. DeWitt mistakenly left phone service on a customers account after the customer cancelled the service. This failure to remove a service plan from a customers account was a specific violation of Southwestern Bells Code of Conduct. Ms. DeWitt was placed on a last chance agreement for this conduct, which specifically stated that even one incident of failing to maintain satisfactory performance in all components of her job may lead to termination. Two months after the last chance agreement, Ms. DeWitt suffered a severe drop in blood sugar while at work and was unable to stabilize her blood sugar after eating food and drinking juice. She experienced disorientation and confusion and called her supervisor for assistance with her computer. Her supervisor instead informed her that he had been monit Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Workplace Rights

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Workplace Rights

Living with type 2 diabetes is hard enough. But what if your condition affects your work or the way people treat you there? Learn about your employment rights as someone with diabetes. Diabetes is considered a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This law applies to any employer in the United States that has 15 employees or more. It also applies to: labor organizations joint labor-management committees employment agencies all state and local government employers If you’re employed by or applying for a job with one of these organizations, the ADA protects you from discrimination. An employer can’t refuse to hire you based solely on your diabetes. In fact, you don’t even have a legal obligation to tell a prospective employer about your condition. Once you’ve been hired, the ADA also requires your employer to provide reasonable accommodations. These include changes to your workplace or routine that can help you to manage your condition. You may also be protected under the Rehabilitation Act if you’re federally employed. Depending on where you live, additional state laws may cover smaller employers or offer broader protections. In most cases, an employer can’t use your diabetes as a reason: not to hire you not to promote you to fire you The only exception is if your condition poses a direct threat to your health or safety or those of others. For example, do you frequently experience hypoglycemic episodes that could interfere with your duties? These episodes might incapacitate you while you’re operating heavy machinery. This could put your life at risk. In this case, an employer has the right not to hire you for a role that requires you to operate that machinery. Once you’ve received a job offer, you’re subject to the same medical req Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Work

Diabetes And Your Work

Diabetes and work don’t always mix. How do you manage food, medicines, rest, monitoring, exercise, and work, especially if you’ve got demands, deadlines, and a boss who’s sweating you? How do you deal with the stress? I asked my son’s 22-year-old friend Don, who was diagnosed with Type 1 in 2008, about his data input job. “Don’t even ask,” he said. “On weekends, I can eat like I’m supposed to. I can test when I need to, exercise if I want to. That’s hard enough. But at work? I don’t think so. We get one lunch break of 35 minutes. We’re supposed to get coffee breaks, but nobody takes them. We’re too busy, so we stay at our desks and type.” I asked Don if he knew about employment law requiring employers to make “reasonable accommodations” for illness and disability, including time to monitor and a private place to do it. “I’ve heard of stuff like that,” he said. “The boss tells me I can test if I really need to, but he says things like ‘don’t take advantage of my good nature.’ I’ve only had the job six months and don’t want to [antagonize] him.” Don may be right to worry. According to the American Diabetes Association, anti-diabetes discrimination at work is a major problem. According to this ADA Web page, “For workers with diabetes, employment discrimination can take many forms, but typically includes a failure to hire or promote you because of your diabetes, termination due to your diabetes, or a failure to provide you with reasonable accommodations that help you do your job.” But worse than discrimination may be a work environment’s direct effects on your health. Work can be a major source of stress, which we know increases insulin resistance and blood pressure. Work stress can lead to consuming unhealthy food, Continue reading >>

Questions & Answers About Diabetes In The Workplace And The Americans With Disabilities Act (ada)

Questions & Answers About Diabetes In The Workplace And The Americans With Disabilities Act (ada)

INTRODUCTION The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was amended by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 ("Amendments Act" or "ADAAA"), is a federal law that prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities include those who have impairments that substantially limit a major life activity, have a record (or history) of a substantially limiting impairment, or are regarded as having a disability.1 Title I of the ADA covers employment by private employers with 15 or more employees as well as state and local government employers. Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act provides similar protections related to federal employment. In addition, most states have their own laws prohibiting employment discrimination on the basis of disability. Some of these state laws may apply to smaller employers and may provide protections in addition to those available under the ADA.2 The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces the employment provisions of the ADA. This document, which is one of a series of question-and-answer documents addressing particular disabilities in the workplace,3 explains how the ADA applies to job applicants and employees who have or had diabetes. In particular, this document explains: when an employer may ask an applicant or employee questions about her diabetes and how it should treat voluntary disclosures; what types of reasonable accommodations employees with diabetes may need; how an employer should handle safety concerns about applicants and employees with diabetes; and how an employer can ensure that no employee is harassed because of diabetes or any other disability. GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT DIABETES Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose or sugar levels Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Diabetes On Employment And Work Productivity

The Impact Of Diabetes On Employment And Work Productivity

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to longitudinally examine the effect of diabetes on labor market outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Using secondary data from the first two waves (1992 and 1994) of the Health and Retirement Study, we identified 7,055 employed respondents (51–61 years of age), 490 of whom reported having diabetes in wave 1. We estimated the effect of diabetes in wave 1 on the probability of working in wave 2 using probit regression. For those working in wave 2, we modeled the relationships between diabetic status in wave 1 and the change in hours worked and work-loss days using ordinary least-squares regressions and modeled the presence of health-related work limitations using probit regression. All models control for health status and job characteristics and are estimated separately by sex. RESULTS—Among individuals with diabetes, the absolute probability of working was 4.4 percentage points less for women and 7.1 percentage points less for men relative to that of their counterparts without diabetes. Change in weekly hours worked was not statistically significantly associated with diabetes. Women with diabetes had 2 more work-loss days per year compared with women without diabetes. Compared with individuals without diabetes, men and women with diabetes were 5.4 and 6 percentage points (absolute increase), respectively, more likely to have work limitations. CONCLUSIONS—This article provides evidence that diabetes affects patients, employers, and society not only by reducing employment but also by contributing to work loss and health-related work limitations for those who remain employed. The medical care costs associated with diabetes create a considerable economic burden for patients, families, and society (1,2). Productivit Continue reading >>

The Best Way To Manage Your Diabetes At Work

The Best Way To Manage Your Diabetes At Work

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Do you have what you need to manage your diabetes at work? Are you able to check your blood sugar , eat, take medications or treat low blood sugar anywhere and at any time? Do you know you have the right to be able to do these important things without fear of penalty? Have you ever been denied a job because you have diabetes? Not long ago, people with diabetes could be denied certain jobs or lose their job simply because they had diabetes or used insulin. Asking for things needed to manage diabetes at work could result in loss of job or decrease in pay. When an employment decision is based on whether a candidate has diabetes instead of their ability to perform the job, it is a form of discrimination. In 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act a federal anti-discrimination law that protects qualified people with disabilities from unfair treatment became law and things began to change. Passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act in 2008 strengthened the ADA. A disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Diabetes substantially limits the function of the endocrine system a major life activity and so is recognized as a disability. What does this mean for people with diabetes? In addition to these laws, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and state laws have helped to provide equal employment opportunity by removing various forms of discrimination or unfair treatment in the workplace. Common examples of discrimination include: Not being allowed to take a break to check blood sugar, eat and/or take insulin. Job offer being ta Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Employees With Diabetes: Its Relation With Work Characteristics And Diabetes Related Burden

Fatigue In Employees With Diabetes: Its Relation With Work Characteristics And Diabetes Related Burden

Abstract Aims: To examine the relations between work characteristics as defined by the Job Demand-Control-Support model (JDCS) (that is, job demands, decision latitude, and social support), diabetes related burden (symptoms, seriousness of disease, self care activities, and disease duration), and fatigue in employees with diabetes mellitus. Methods: Employees (n = 292) aged 30–60 years, with insulin treated diabetes, filled in self administered questionnaires that assess the above mentioned components of the JDCS model and diabetes related burdens. Results: Both work and diabetes related factors are related to fatigue in employees with diabetes. Regression analyses revealed that work characteristics explain 19.1% of the variance in fatigue; lack of support, and the interaction of job demands and job control contribute significantly. Diabetes related factors explain another 29.0% of the variance, with the focus on diabetes related symptoms and the burden of adjusting insulin dosage to circumstances. Fatigue is more severe in case of lack of social support at work, high job demands in combination with a lack of decision latitude, more burden of adjusting insulin dosage to circumstances, and more diabetic symptoms. Furthermore, regression analysis revealed that diabetic symptoms and the burden of adjusting the insulin dosage to circumstances are especially relevant in combination with high job demands. Conclusions: Both diabetes and work should be taken into consideration—by (occupational) physicians as well as supervisors—in the communication with people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

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