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Diabetes And Teeth Falling Out

Smoking, Gum Disease, And Tooth Loss

Smoking, Gum Disease, And Tooth Loss

What Is Gum Disease? Gum (periodontal) disease is an infection of the gums and can affect the bone structure that supports your teeth. In severe cases, it can make your teeth fall out. Smoking is an important cause of severe gum disease in the United States.1 Gum disease starts with bacteria (germs) on your teeth that get under your gums. If the germs stay on your teeth for too long, layers of plaque (film) and tartar (hardened plaque) develop. This buildup leads to early gum disease, called gingivitis.2 When gum disease gets worse, your gums can pull away from your teeth and form spaces that get infected. This is severe gum disease, also called periodontitis. The bone and tissue that hold your teeth in place can break down, and your teeth may loosen and need to be pulled out.3 Red or swollen gums Tender or bleeding gums Painful chewing Loose teeth Sensitive teeth Gums that have pulled away from your teeth How Is Smoking Related to Gum Disease? Smoking weakens your body's infection fighters (your immune system). This makes it harder to fight off a gum infection. Once you have gum damage, smoking also makes it harder for your gums to heal.4,5,6 What does this mean for me if I am a smoker? Tobacco use in any form—cigarettes, pipes, and smokeless (spit) tobacco—raises your risk for gum disease.7 How Can Gum Disease Be Prevented? You can help avoid gum disease with good dental habits.3 Brush your teeth twice a day. Floss often to remove plaque. See a dentist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings. Don't smoke. If you smoke, quit. How Is Gum Disease Treated? Regular cleanings at your dentist's office and daily brushing and flossing can help treat early gum disease (gingivitis).2 Deep cleaning below the gum line. Prescription mouth rinse or medicine. Surgery to Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Side Effect You've Never Heard Of

The Diabetes Side Effect You've Never Heard Of

Something to chew on: The 8.3% of Americans suffering from diabetes are also at greater risk for tooth loss—especially those over age 50, finds a new study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association. A team of New York-based researchers analyzed national data on more than 2,500 people age 50 and up. Here’s what they discovered: Diabetics—including those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes—were missing an average of nearly 10 teeth at the time of oral examination compared to non-diabetics, who were short fewer than seven teeth. And that’s not all: Diabetics were also twice as likely to suffer from edentulism, a complete absence of teeth; twenty-eight percent of diabetes sufferers were toothless, compared to just 14% of those without diabetes. The study authors say there may be several ways to explain the connection between diabetes and tooth loss. One theory is that hyperglycemia—or high blood sugar—disrupts the delivery of nutrients and removal of waste products from the tissue in the gums. Over time, that leads to periodontal disease and, eventually, to tooth loss. While those who have poorly controlled diabetes are most likely to experience tooth decay, even well-managed diabetics are more likely to suffer from periodontal disease. What should diabetics do to protect themselves? Apart from brushing twice a day and flossing regularly, some diabetics may need to visit their dentist four times a year for a professional tooth and gum cleaning, says study co-author Jayanth Kumar, DDS, MPH, of the New York State Department of Health’s bureau of dental health. Gum disease starts when bacteria on your teeth harden into tartar, and only your dentist can clear that tartar away. Avoid sugary snacks, which are well-known tooth decayers, and reach for Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Health

Diabetes And Dental Health

Prevention beats problems every time especially if you have diabetes, the disease that harms your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Your mouth is not immune to the effects of diabetes, either. It's a "catch-22" Glucose control, please. Poor control? Expect poor teeth and gums. Poor teeth and gums? Expect poor control. That's the way it is. If you have poor sugar control, you have a greater chance of getting periodontitis, and odds are that it will be worse if you are diabetic. This means periodontitis is harder to treat and you'll lose more teeth. Diabetics with well-controlled blood sugar have no greater chance of periodontal disease than people without diabetes. And this includes those with type 1. The tough thing about periodontitis (chronic infection of any area around the tooth) is the inflammation is often hidden from view. That's one of the things that make it a significant problem, because when advanced, it causes painful chewing, bone loss, and loosened and weak teeth, allowing them to decay and require removal. Here's why: Blood vessel changes - When diabetic blood vessels thicken, the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the gums is reduced. The reduced flow also slows the clearing of waste products. The combination weakens the resistance of gum tissue and bone structure to an infection. Bacteria - Elevated blood sugar is associated with a higher sugar content in the saliva in your mouth. This increased "sweetness" helps bacteria grow, overpower the resistance to infection, and cause gum and bone disease. Smoking - The plain facts about smoking and gum disease are: Smokers are five times more likely than nonsmokers to have gum disease. Diabetic smokers, age 45 or older, are 20 times more likely to get severe gum disease. Gingivi Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Hair Loss?

Does Diabetes Cause Hair Loss?

What diabetes can do to your body If you have diabetes, your body doesn’t produce insulin, doesn’t use it effectively, or both. Insulin is a hormone that moves the sugar from the foods you eat from your bloodstream into your cells to be stored or used as energy. When you don’t have insulin or it isn’t used effectively, sugar can build up in your blood. That excess sugar can damage organs all over your body, including your eyes, nerves, and kidneys. It can also damage your blood vessels. These vessels carry oxygen around your body to nourish organs and tissues. Damaged blood vessels may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to nourish your hair follicles. This lack of oxygen can affect your normal hair growth cycle. Hair usually goes through three phases. During the active growing phase, which lasts for two years or more, hairs grow at a rate of 1 to 2 cm per month. Hair then goes into a resting phase, which lasts for about 100 days. After this phase, some of the resting hair falls out. Diabetes can interrupt this process, slowing down your hair growth. Having diabetes can also cause you to lose more hair than usual. That hair loss isn’t only on your head. You can lose hairs on your arms, legs, and other body parts, too. When hair regrows, it does so at a slower-than-normal rate. People with diabetes are more likely to have a condition called alopecia areata. With alopecia, the immune system attacks the hair follicles, leading to patches of hair loss on the head and on other parts of the body. Diabetes itself can lead to hair loss. You may also lose hair as a side effect of stress from living with a chronic illness, or from medicines you take to treat your diabetes. Some people with diabetes also have thyroid disease, which can contribute to hair loss. Speak wit Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Tooth Loss?

Are You At Risk For Tooth Loss?

Disembodied dentures smiling back at you from a glass. A sunken-in, toothless face. Hours in a dental chair, awaiting expensive implants. If images like these give you the heebie-jeebies, take heart. Although tooth loss is common, it's not an inevitable part of aging, says Richard H. Price, DDS, a retired dentist in Newton, Mass., and spokesman for the American Dental Association. "Teeth do not die a natural death -- we kill them," Price says. Exactly how do we do that? In short, by disease or trauma, Price says. Tooth Loss from Trauma "When an irresistible force meets the immovable object, something gives," Price says. Trauma might be anything from getting hit by a baseball to biting on a frozen candy bar. Your teeth are great tools. But not for things like: Removing caps, tops, or lids Cracking ice cubes, nut shells, or popcorn kernels Chewing on pencils or pens Holding clothes hangers Loosening knots or tearing off tags Cutting thread Clenching and grinding - often done in response to stress -- can also put too much stress on your teeth. It can also mean a bite is unbalanced, Price says. Both deserve your attention. Tooth Loss From Disease Plaque -- bacterial buildup that resides in sticky stuff on your teeth -- causes decay and can lead to periodontal disease, which inflames gums and destroys supporting tissues such as ligaments and bones. And with their demise can come loose -- and eventually lost -- teeth. Poor oral hygiene and lack of professional care are big contributors. Other factors that put you at greater risk for periodontal disease and potential tooth loss include: Changing hormones during pregnancy can also affect a woman's response to disease. So it's especially important to get regular professional care throughout pregnancy. People with developmental a Continue reading >>

For Black Americans With Diabetes, Tooth Loss Is A Major Problem

For Black Americans With Diabetes, Tooth Loss Is A Major Problem

Black people with diabetes in the US have a higher risk of tooth loss compared with white and Mexican Americans with the same condition, according to aCDC report published today. This is bad news, since oral health can be used as a way of tracking overall health. It suggests black Americans aren’t getting the care they need. People with diabetes lose about twice as many teeth as people without — that’s true across all ethnicities. But black people with diabetes lost the greatest number of teeth, the report says. And no progress has been made on this front since 1999; rates of tooth loss haven’t slowed at all. For people who get to see a dentist on a regular basis, tooth loss may not seem like a big deal. But there's an important relationship between oral health and certain chronic health conditions; studies have shown links between bad oral health and cognitive decline, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory diseases. Black Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke, and are almost twice as likely to have diabetes compared with white Americans — so improving their oral health could help with their overall health. What’s more, dental pain can affect people's ability to perform well at their jobs. Cavities, gum disease, and eventually tooth loss may then have consequences for job security as well, then, by affecting people’s ability to work. This leaves them further disadvantaged. That’s why researchers are so concerned with the state of American teeth. Luo et al. (2015) This isn't the first time that the CDC has identified a racial gap in the oral health of Americans. Earlier this year, a report showed that black children are twice as likely to have untreated dental cavities compared with non-Hispanic white children. And that tr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Mouth

Diabetes And Your Mouth

Here’s a good diabetes New Year’s Resolution. Repeat after me: This year I will take care of my mouth! Having healthy gums is one of the very best things you can do for your diabetes. Why is mouth care so important? It’s because gum problems in diabetes create a vicious cycle. As gums become more inflamed, the whole body reacts by becoming more insulin resistant and raising blood sugars. That is part of the inflammatory response. Then the higher sugar levels feed the germs that cause the gums to become infected. Your gums start bleeding and swelling, your breath gets worse, your teeth become loose, and the infection raises your sugar levels even more. Studies find that people in certain populations with diabetes and severe gum disease die at three times the rate from cardiac or kidney disease as people who have diabetes but don’t have gum disease. This increase is what you would expect from an A1C of 12%, which corresponds to extremely high blood sugar levels. The Mayo Clinic explains how this happens. “When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with bacteria [in your mouth], a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth.” If you don’t scrape the plaque off with regular brushing and flossing, it gets under the gums and forms a hard substance called tartar. Tartar causes inflammation in the gums, known as gingivitis. After a while, gingivitis can lead to a gum infection called periodontitis. As the Mayo Clinic puts it, periodontitis “destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth…caus[ing] your gums to pull away from your teeth and your teeth to loosen and even fall out.” How to prevent this Dental care is mostly self-management. It starts with: • Brushing and flossing. Experts at the American Diabetes Association and Ame Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To Increased Risk Of Tooth Loss

Diabetes Linked To Increased Risk Of Tooth Loss

Study of 40-year trend focused on three ethnic groups prone to dental complications. Diabetes has been increasing in the United States over the years. According to the CDC, diabetes rate have tripled from 1980 to 2014. Diabetics are at risk for multiple complications such as cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, eye damage, hearing impairment, skin disease, and periodontal disease. Researchers have identified a relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. About half of the U.S. population suffers from periodontal disease and the prevalence for periodontal disease is greater in adults with diabetes. “One of the many complications of diabetes is a greater risk for periodontal disease,” said Maria E. Ryan, DDS, PhD, Professor of Oral Biology and Pathology, and Director of Clinical Research, School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook University, New York, in a recent interview. “If you have this oral infection and inflammation, as with any infection, it’s much more difficult to control blood glucose levels.” Intensive periodontitis treatment significantly reduces levels of A1C. These links between oral and systemic health may start even before clinical diabetes begins. “We have found evidence that the severity of periodontal disease is associated with higher levels of insulin resistance, often a precursor of type 2 diabetes, as well as with higher levels of A1C, a measure of poor glycemic control of diabetes,” she said. The importance of these findings were emphasized by her colleague, George W. Taylor, DrPH, DMD, Associate Professor of Dentistry, Schools of Dentistry and Public Health, University of Michigan. “Several recent studies have shown that having periodontal disease makes those with type 2 diabetes more likely to develop worsened glycemic contr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

The Link Between Heart & Gum Diseases

The Link Between Heart & Gum Diseases

Diabetes is a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect the body's ability to process sugar. If you have diabetes, it is particularly important to maintain excellent oral health. That's because diabetics are more prone to oral infections such as periodontal (gum) disease, which can result in tooth loss if left untreated. Conversely, the presence of gum disease can make it harder for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar levels. Periodontal disease is a chronic ailment that is also associated with an elevated level of systemic (whole-body) inflammation. Like diabetes, it may have wide-ranging consequences outside the mouth — possibly increasing a person's chance of experiencing major cardiovascular events (such as heart attack or stroke) or adverse pregnancy outcomes (low birth weight and pre-term delivery). So perhaps it's not surprising that a growing body of evidence suggests the two diseases are related. Two Diseases With A Lot In Common It has long been recognized that having diabetes is a risk factor likely to increase the severity of periodontal disease. That's because diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection, making diabetics more susceptible to both bacterial and fungal infections. Likewise, evidence shows that having serious gum disease (periodontitis) is likely to result in worsening blood glucose control in diabetics; it can also increase the risk of diabetic complications. So, what's the connection? While no one is sure at present, the two diseases seem to share some common pathways and disease-causing mechanisms. Both are associated with the process of inflammation and the immune response. Inflammation itself — often signaled by pain, heat and redness — is evidence of the body's immune system at work, attempting to figh Continue reading >>

Periodontal Disease In Diabetic Patients Can Lead To Tooth Loss

Periodontal Disease In Diabetic Patients Can Lead To Tooth Loss

by Donna Pleis Diabetes is a very deceptive disease with some surprising statistics. It affects approximately 25.8 million people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal (gum) disease. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients can ultimately result in the loss of one or more teeth. In fact, the American Dental Association published a recent study that linked one in five cases of total tooth loss to diabetes. Understanding Periodontal Disease Like diabetes, periodontal disease can be sneaky and develop slowly without a lot of warning. As detailed by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, gum disease starts when bacteria in your mouth forms a sticky plaque biofilm that adheres to your teeth, especially around the gum line. If not removed regularly and thoroughly, the bacteria in the plaque creates toxins that cause inflammation of your gums. Symptoms of this first stage of gum disease, called gingivitis, are red, swollen and bleeding gums. If untreated, gingivitis progresses into periodontitis. As more plaque forms on your teeth, at the gum line and under your gums, it eventually hardens into tartar. This causes your gums to pull away from your teeth and form loose pockets. The bacterial toxins create an infection within the pockets that starts to destroy the bone and ligaments surrounding your teeth. Without bone and strong connective tissue to support your teeth, they will begin to loosen, and you may eventually have to have teeth removed. The Diabetes-Periodontal Disease Connection If you are diabetic, you know that high blood sugar levels put you at risk for problems with your kidneys, eyes and heart. In addition, diabetes causes your healing process to be slower an Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Tooth Loss

Diabetes And Tooth Loss

Thank you for Sharing Diabetics have unusually high blood sugar levels, which puts them at a higher risk for kidney, eyes, and heart problems. Additionally, diabetes also affects the body’s healing process, slowing it down, while also compromising one’s immunity against infections. If you’re a diabetic, you probably already have a lot to worry about. Your teeth, though, should be the last of your concerns. But it is, as your condition puts you at risk for periodontal disease, and if left unchecked, tooth loss. Periodontal Disease and Diabetics Because of their weakened immune systems, diabetics are more likely to develop infections compared to other people. Periodontal disease, which causes inflammation, and in worse cases, tissue loss and bone less, is a type of infection. If you don’t manage your diabetes properly, your risk of infection is much higher. In fact, even a simple mouth infection can grow worse in a short amount of time and cause all sorts of problems. This is why plenty of diabetics, regardless of age, suffer from periodontal disease. In fact, it’s not unusual for diabetic children to already have the extensive periodontal disease by the time they become adults. Put simply, the threat of losing teeth and periodontitis, the advanced form of gum disease, is very real if you can’t stay on top of your condition. Preventing Tooth Loss There’s a silver lining to all of this, though. While your risk of periodontal disease and tooth loss is much higher, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll eventually lose your teeth to periodontal disease. Remember, you’re just at risk; tooth loss is not your destiny. You can start by taking the time to understand your condition and the many risks that come with it. By doing so, you can make better decisi Continue reading >>

Woman Loses Her Teeth After Abusing Diabetes For Weight Loss

Woman Loses Her Teeth After Abusing Diabetes For Weight Loss

Be careful what you wish for. Skye Simpson, a 30-year-old Australian beauty therapist, manipulated her long-time diabetes to lose weight. But those 60 pounds she shed over the course of six months didn’t come cheaply: Simpson lost all of her teeth and now has to wear dentures. Simpson, who has suffered from Type 1 diabetes since age 7, would purposely disregard prescribed insulin injections so that her body — unable to use the food she ate as fuel — would burn its fat stores. “I didn’t want to give up food, or exercise. I was too lazy for that. I loved snacking on chips, bread and biscuits,” Simpson tells Caters News Agency. “At first I was only skipping one injection a day. But as the weight dropped off, I became hooked and in just a few weeks, I was skipping my insulin altogether.” Known as diabulimia, the condition Simpson suffered from is a diagnosable eating disorder in which diabetics avoid insulin in order to shed pounds. The tactic worked: She slimmed down from a size 14 to a size 6 (in US sizes, from a 10 to a 2), sometimes losing as much as 6 ¹/₂ pounds a week. At her lightest, Simpson weighed in at just over 100 pounds — and she’s 5-feet-7. Then the health consequences kicked in. “First I started losing clumps of my long blond hair, and then my vision became blurry. Stupidly, I just ignored it,” she says. “It felt worth it if it meant I could be slim.” Over the course of 18 months of insulin abuse, Simpson was hospitalized multiple times. Her teeth began to crumble, and a severe gum infection led to an operation that left her gums bare and exposed. (She now wears dentures.) After realizing she needed help and discovering what diabulimia was, Simpson approached her doctor. She now receives psychotherapy and has gained back about Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Complications

Diabetes And Dental Complications

It has long been known that having diabetes increases the risk of severe periodontal disease. For example, people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease than those with well-controlled diabetes. Studies have found that poorly controlled diabetes respond differently to bacterial plaque at the gum line than do people with well-controlled diabetes and people without the disease. Also, people with poorly controlled diabetes have more harmful proteins (cytokines) in their gingival tissue, causing destructive inflammation of the gums. In turn, beneficial proteins (growth factors) are reduced, interfering with the healing response to infection. Lastly, people with diabetes tend to lose collagen, a protein that supports gums, skin, tendon cartilage, and bone, in their gum tissue, thus hastening periodontal destruction. Vascular disorders (caused by diabetes), such as reduced circulation in tiny blood vessels in the gums, interfere with nutrition and healing in the gum tissues. Young people with type 1 diabetes, especially those with poor control, are very vulnerable to early-onset periodontal disease as they reach puberty. Studies on Diabetes and Dental Problems A study published in the September 2002 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice looked at 102 patients, average age 65 with type 2 diabetes. In this Swedish study, the researchers conducted a comprehensive dental examination and then compared these results with the same battery of tests given to a control group without diabetes but otherwise the same in terms of age and gender. The results indicate that subjects with diabetes had more pockets between teeth, which indicate moderate to advanced gum disease. They also had deeper pockets. The group with diabetes had mo Continue reading >>

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