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Diabetes And Teeth Breaking

Is Diabetes Causing Tooth Loss?

Is Diabetes Causing Tooth Loss?

Dental health is a real concern for many people with diabetes, but it does not get the attention it deserves. I am glad that you are bringing it up. Diabetes is linked to tooth loss primarily because people with diabetes are more susceptible to periodontal disease. Periodontal diseases are infections, inflammations, and loss of tissue in the gums and other tooth-supporting structures such as bone. Individuals with diabetes, especially those who have poor glucose control, have a blunted defense mechanism against infections. Minor infections in the mouth, therefore, can linger on or worsen, causing chronic inflammation and erosions. Along with poor glucose control, smoking and alcohol use also cause and aggravate periodontal disease. And this isn't just a problem in adults with diabetes. Diabetic children, too, often have extensive periodontal disease by the time they reach adolescence. Keep in mind that periodontal diseases are preventable and can be treated. It is very important to do so not only to prevent tooth loss but also because periodontal disease is linked to heart attacks and strokes. In the past few years, we have come to understand that individuals who experience heart attacks and strokes also tend to have periodontal disease. People with diabetes should maintain normal glucose levels, get regular dental care, floss at least daily, refrain from smoking, and drink in moderation. Learn more in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

Periodontal (gum) Disease

Periodontal (gum) Disease

A A A Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys bone and gum tissues that support the teeth. Periodontal disease affects many Americans and is the major cause of adult tooth loss. Teeth are supported by the gums, or gingiva and bone. A tooth's root is anchored to the bone within its socket by fibers called periodontal ligaments. The gums do not attach to the teeth as firmly as one might think. A shallow, V-shaped gap called a sulcus exists between the teeth and the gums. Periodontal disease affects this gap and more. Eventually, in periodontal disease, the tissues supporting the tooth break down. If only the superficial gums are involved in this breakdown, the disease is referred to as gingivitis. If it is more advanced and involves the connecting tissues and bone, then it is called periodontitis. Plaque is a sticky film of bacteria that clings to the surface of teeth and gums. Brushing and flossing every day may not completely remove all the plaque, especially around the gum line. The bacteria in the plaque produce toxins that may injure the gums and supporting tissues. Plaque that is not completely removed within 48 hours hardens into a rough deposit called tartar or calculus. Once tartar develops, the only way to remove it is by having the teeth professionally cleaned. Tartar below the gum line causes inflammation and infection. Because this process is often painless, a person may be unaware a problem exists. Causes or factors that worsen gum disease include the following: Inherited factors (genetics) Infrequent dental care Insufficient calcium intake Inflammatory response by the body occurs that creates further problems. Because of a dulled immune response and less oxygen in the mouth, smokers are two to seven times more likely to develop p Continue reading >>

Periodontal Disease In Diabetic Patients Can Lead To Tooth Loss

Periodontal Disease In Diabetic Patients Can Lead To Tooth Loss

by Donna Pleis Diabetes is a very deceptive disease with some surprising statistics. It affects approximately 25.8 million people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal (gum) disease. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients can ultimately result in the loss of one or more teeth. In fact, the American Dental Association published a recent study that linked one in five cases of total tooth loss to diabetes. Understanding Periodontal Disease Like diabetes, periodontal disease can be sneaky and develop slowly without a lot of warning. As detailed by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, gum disease starts when bacteria in your mouth forms a sticky plaque biofilm that adheres to your teeth, especially around the gum line. If not removed regularly and thoroughly, the bacteria in the plaque creates toxins that cause inflammation of your gums. Symptoms of this first stage of gum disease, called gingivitis, are red, swollen and bleeding gums. If untreated, gingivitis progresses into periodontitis. As more plaque forms on your teeth, at the gum line and under your gums, it eventually hardens into tartar. This causes your gums to pull away from your teeth and form loose pockets. The bacterial toxins create an infection within the pockets that starts to destroy the bone and ligaments surrounding your teeth. Without bone and strong connective tissue to support your teeth, they will begin to loosen, and you may eventually have to have teeth removed. The Diabetes-Periodontal Disease Connection If you are diabetic, you know that high blood sugar levels put you at risk for problems with your kidneys, eyes and heart. In addition, diabetes causes your healing process to be slower an Continue reading >>

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetes affects almost 26 million Americans, which is more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. The condition often requires them to make lifestyle changes, including what they eat, how they exercise and the medications they take. It also requires them to change the way they take care of their teeth and gums. About one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease which is causing the gum tissue and bone around the teeth to break down, according to the National Institutes of Health. People with poorly-controlled diabetes had a 2.9 times increased risk of developing periodontitis than non-diabetics, according to a large study published in 2002. The same study found people with well-controlled diabetes had no significant increase in the risk of periodontitis. There are several reasons why poorly-controlled diabetes can increase your chance of getting periodontal disease, said Dr. Dale Nash, a dentist at Coast Dental Wesley Chapel. In the past decade, Dr. Nash has seen an increase in the number of patients with diabetes. "People with diabetes are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection," Dr. Nash said. "Diabetics have high blood sugar, which basically coats the immune-fighting cells and affects the blood supply to many areas of the body including the patient’s mouth." Here’s how it works: The poor circulation affects the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the gums, called the gingiva, and the cells in your mouth that help fight off infection. If the gums can’t get the nutrients they need, then it’s harder to fight infection. Also, poor circulation means the blood can’t carry away bad bacteria effectively. Research shows the functions of immune cells in poorly-controlled diabetics are altered in other ways.(1) One kind o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Health

Diabetes And Dental Health

Prevention beats problems every time especially if you have diabetes, the disease that harms your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Your mouth is not immune to the effects of diabetes, either. It's a "catch-22" Glucose control, please. Poor control? Expect poor teeth and gums. Poor teeth and gums? Expect poor control. That's the way it is. If you have poor sugar control, you have a greater chance of getting periodontitis, and odds are that it will be worse if you are diabetic. This means periodontitis is harder to treat and you'll lose more teeth. Diabetics with well-controlled blood sugar have no greater chance of periodontal disease than people without diabetes. And this includes those with type 1. The tough thing about periodontitis (chronic infection of any area around the tooth) is the inflammation is often hidden from view. That's one of the things that make it a significant problem, because when advanced, it causes painful chewing, bone loss, and loosened and weak teeth, allowing them to decay and require removal. Here's why: Blood vessel changes - When diabetic blood vessels thicken, the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the gums is reduced. The reduced flow also slows the clearing of waste products. The combination weakens the resistance of gum tissue and bone structure to an infection. Bacteria - Elevated blood sugar is associated with a higher sugar content in the saliva in your mouth. This increased "sweetness" helps bacteria grow, overpower the resistance to infection, and cause gum and bone disease. Smoking - The plain facts about smoking and gum disease are: Smokers are five times more likely than nonsmokers to have gum disease. Diabetic smokers, age 45 or older, are 20 times more likely to get severe gum disease. Gingivi Continue reading >>

Watch Your Mouth!

Watch Your Mouth!

What health condition has killed the most adult humans since the beginning of recorded time? Most likely it was gum disease (also called “periodontitis”). Before modern food processing made food soft and mushy, people who lost their teeth couldn’t eat natural food. So they became weak and died. Unfortunately, gum disease may still be a killer for people with diabetes. According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), “Periodontal disease is often considered the sixth complication of diabetes. Those people who don’t have their diabetes under control are especially at risk.” A 2005 study in Diabetes Care of Pima Indians with diabetes found that those with severe gum disease had three times the death rate from heart and kidney disease as those with healthier gums. This is serious. According to major studies, a tripling of mortality rate would be approximately what you would expect from running an A1C of 12%. What could make gum disease so dangerous? And are we putting enough effort into our teeth? The effect on heart and kidneys tells us that gum disease has something to do with blood vessels. Research shows that gum infection causes inflammation throughout the body, by releasing chemicals called “cytokines.” When the cytokines inflame blood vessels, the vessels block up with plaque. This blockage causes heart disease, kidney disease, and probably strokes as well. Inflammation also causes insulin resistance, raising blood glucose. This connection is a vicious circle. Gum infections raise blood glucose levels. At the same time, high blood glucose makes it harder to fight infections. High glucose seems to weaken white blood cells called “neutrophils,” so they can’t kill germs as well. So effective diabetes self-management needs a strong dose of Continue reading >>

Tooth Extraction

Tooth Extraction

Overview Background Tooth extraction is linked to dentists who perform oral surgery. Teeth that are embedded in bone (eg, impacted or wisdom teeth) must be removed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon who is trained for 4-6 years after obtaining a dental or medical degree. Compared with removal of an impacted tooth, tooth extraction appears to be a relatively simple technical procedure. However, both tooth extraction and removal of an impacted tooth must be performed in accordance with surgical principles that have evolved from both basic research and centuries of trial and error. Tooth extraction leaves a surgical wound, which has to heal. Accordingly, a basic understanding of wound healing is essential for performing this surgical procedure in the oral cavity. Like any other minor surgical procedure, tooth extraction requires careful medical evaluation of the patient. Patients with diabetes, hypertension, renal disease, thyroid disease, adrenal disease, or other organ disease must be treated and their disease controlled before tooth extraction. Because the oral cavity is full of microorganisms, any surgical procedure in this area may give rise to postoperative infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. Before, during, and after tooth extraction, pain management is an important issue. Medical, surgical, and legal considerations exist; for example, removing the wrong tooth is malpractice, as is breaking the jaw during extraction or causing paresthesia after extracting the mandibular third molar in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve without proper informed consent. Indications Teeth are important for aesthetic purposes and for maintaining masticatory function. Accordingly, all efforts to avoid tooth extraction must be exhausted before the decision i Continue reading >>

How Diabetes And Dental Problems Coincide

How Diabetes And Dental Problems Coincide

The affect of diabetes on your overall health is more consequential than many people realize. Problems with diet and circulation are well known, but did you realize that diabetes can also degrade your oral health? If you or someone you love is working to manage diabetes, it is important that you understand how the condition is affecting your teeth and gums. Diabetes and Dental Problems > There’s a Link Tooth Decay Diabetes raises your blood sugar level causing sugars and starches to build up in your mouth. When those substances react with natural oral bacteria, they cause plaque to build up on the outside of your teeth. Over time, the acid in that plaque breaks down the enamel on your teeth, causing you to develop cavities. People with diabetes need to be aware that they are at increased risk for tooth decay. Gum Disease Patients with diabetes suffer from a reduced ability to fight off bacteria. If you do not brush and floss regularly, plaque caused by bacteria will harden around your gum line into a substance known as tartar. The longer that this abrasive substance is allowed to build up around your gums, the more frequently and severely they will become irritated. If your gums have become swollen and bleed easily, diabetes may be exacerbating the problem. Advanced Gum Disease If gum disease is left untreated, it can develop into an advanced form known as periodontitis. This condition slowly causes the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth to break down. In extreme cases, this can cause your teeth to become loose and even fall out. Patients with diabetes are at greater risk of periodontitis because their bodies struggle to fight off infections. Plus, the infection itself can cause your blood sugar to rise, making it more difficult to manage diabetes. Preventat Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes And Dental Problems

Managing Diabetes And Dental Problems

by Donna Pleis If you are one of the 26 million adults living with diabetes, you know how sensitive your high blood sugar makes you to other conditions, especially dental problems. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) describes managing diabetes and dental problems as a two-way endeavor: High blood sugar levels can put you at risk of complications such as gum disease, and serious cases left untreated can cause diabetes to worsen. By engaging dental problems early, your blood sugar levels can improve, reinforcing your general health in the long term. Dental Risks with Diabetes According to the ADA, diabetics are two to five times more likely to develop periodontal (gum) disease than someone without diabetes. If your glucose levels are not controlled while fighting periodontal disease, it can progress more rapidly toward tooth loss. You may also experience dry mouth, due to certain medications or as an outcome of high blood sugar. Without sufficient saliva to neutralize the acids in your mouth, the remaining bacteria are free to produce tooth decay. Thrush, a fungal infection, is another common oral complication that can cause mouth sores and ulcers, and makes wearing dentures uncomfortable. But don't worry, there's plenty you can do to avoid these risks and defend a healthy mouth. Managing Your Dental Health Impeccable oral hygiene is always necessary for good dental health. Brush with a fluoride toothpaste twice a day, and floss at least once a day. Ask your dentist about Colgate® PerioGuard®, a prescription strength antibacterial rinse that fights gingivitis and helps heal swollen gums. If dry mouth is a problem for you, consider saliva substitutes or sugarless gum. And regular dental appointments are obviously important. Be sure to keep your dentist up to date on Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Mouth: Keep Your Smile Healthy

Diabetes And Your Mouth: Keep Your Smile Healthy

Your mouth is home to millions of germs. Chronically high blood sugar disrupts the body's immune response to bacteria allowing them to grow. That’s one reason why people with diabetes are prone to getting periodontal (gum) disease. If you have diabetes, you need to take especially good care of your teeth and gums. Gum Disease The bacteria in your mouth form a sticky, naturally occurring substance called plaque. Plaque builds up on your teeth—especially along the gum line—unless you brush and floss regularly. If ignored, the plaque eventually hardens into tartar, the gritty stuff your dentist scrapes off when cleaning your teeth. Both plaque and tartar can lead to infection in your gums. Early gum disease is called gingivitis. Gums can become swollen, red, and prone to bleeding. If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a severe infection of the gums called periodontitis. It can cause the gums to come loose from the tooth root and recede, and the bone that holds your teeth in place to break down. You may notice bad breath, loose teeth, and pus when you press on the gums. Other Problems Diabetes makes it easier to get other kinds of mouth infections, too. People with diabetes often have dry mouth. Lack of saliva can lead to tooth decay. Swelling, pain when you chew, or sensitivity to hot, cold, or sweet foods can be signs of tooth decay or infection. White or red patches can signal a fungal infection called thrush. Thrush can be triggered by having high blood glucose, taking antibiotics, smoking, or wearing dentures that don’t fit well. Keep Your Smile Bright Protect your teeth and gums with these simple steps: Keep your blood glucose controlled. Brush your teeth twice a day using fluoride toothpaste. Gently brush all tooth surfaces and along the gum line. Floss a Continue reading >>

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

You may have type 2 diabetes istock/FangXiaNuo Red, swollen gums that may bleed are the hallmarks of periodontal disease—an incredibly common condition that affects more than 47 percent of Americans 30 and older and more than 70 percent of adults 65 and older, according to the CDC. Periodontal disease is brought on by bacteria in the mouth that infect the tissues and create plaque. "Diabetes makes periodontal disease worse," says Paulo Camargo, DDS, professor of periodontics and associate dean for clinical dental sciences at UCLA School of Dentistry. "Periodontal disease can also make the blood sugar more difficult to control." Research shows that diabetes is a major risk factor for periodontitis, a more serious form of periodontal disease that can damage soft tissues and destroy the bone that supports teeth. In fact, people with diabetes are three times more susceptible to developing periodontitis than those who aren't diabetic. "If gums bleed a lot and are swollen or the patient is having frequent abscesses or infections, the dentist might start to question if you have a family history of diabetes," says Sally Cram, DDS, a periodontist in Washington, DC, and a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Diabetes isn't the only health problem associated with periodontal disease: The disease, which triggers a harmful, inflammatory response, is also linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. These are other type 2 diabetes symptoms you shouldn’t ignore. istock/stevanovicigor Eating garlic knots and forgetting to brush your tongue aren't the only causes of bad breath. In some cases, especially if you already have a solid brushing and flossing regimen in place, a lingering case of halitosis can signal a health problem, such as gastroesophageal reflux dis Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Smile

Diabetes And Your Smile

Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The Symptoms of Untreated Diabetes The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. (Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often (gingivitis). You may have problems tasting food. You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlier than is Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Put Your Teeth At Risk?

Could Diabetes Put Your Teeth At Risk?

Diabetes affects many different parts of the body, and some Sacramento residents aren’t yet aware of the increased potential for tooth and gum disease that comes with insulin-resistant diabetes. Some people don’t realize the connection until they find themselves in need of an Emergency Dentist. While most people are aware of the dangers of plaque and its tendency to build up on teeth, not everyone knows that elevated levels of blood glucose can cause plaque to build up much faster. Some people don’t learn the risks of diabetes to their teeth until they have a sudden and severe problem. According to the American Dental Association, diabetes patients are more prone to gum disease, tooth decay, fungal infections, inflammatory skin diseases, delayed healing, salivary gland dysfunction, and taste impairment. Whether you see a regular Sacramento dentist or an Emergency Dentist, you need to make sure the person caring for your mouth knows about your diabetes. The bacteria that inhabit the plaque on your teeth thrive on sugar, which they convert into an enamel-destroying acid. In healthy people with well-controlled blood sugars, the bacteria only get fed when sweetened food and beverages are consumed. However, a person with chronically high blood sugar has elevated levels of sugar in their saliva, thus feeding the bacteria all the time. Well-fed bacterial plaque can cause a multitude of problems. Constant feeding of the bacteria can cause rapid tooth decay as the plaque continually eats away at the enamel. Rapid plaque growth can harden into tarter, making proper oral hygiene extremely difficult. Some diabetes patients struggle with continual gum infection and inflammation, others don’t realize they have a problem until they suddenly need an Emergency Dentist for an ext Continue reading >>

Effect Of Diabetes On Teeth And Gums

Effect Of Diabetes On Teeth And Gums

Diabetes is a very important disease from a dental point of view. Uncontrolled Diabetes is a cause of concern as it has many detrimental effects on teeth and gums. Effects of uncontrolled Diabetes Tooth decay: In case of uncontrolled Diabetes high glucose levels in saliva help bacteria to thrive resulting in greater acid attacks on the teeth thus resulting in a greater number of cavities. Periodontal disease: Gum disease is very commonly seen in patients with uncontrolled Diabetes. This is primarily because such patients have a lowered body resistance to infections and delayed healing. Common Signs: i) Gums are spongy in nature and bleed very easily on brushing. ii) There is persistent bad breath or bad taste. iii) Presence of permanent teeth that are loose or separating. iv) There are frequent gum boils or Periodontal Abcess. All these demand a visit to a dental clinic as studies have shown that people with gum disease are at a greater risk of getting heart diseases and also there is greater occurrence of premature low-birth weight babies in pregnant women with gum diseases. Dry Mouth: Xerostomia or dry mouth is a common complaint of a Diabetic patient. Due to excessive fluid loss or Polyuria seen in Diabetics the mouth remains dry. This can lead to drying and cracking of the soft tissues of the mouth. Patients often complain of burning sensations in the mouth. This reduced flow of saliva also results in tooth decay, as saliva is known to flush away food debris from the mouth thus cutting off the food supply of the bacteria. It also helps in reduction of acidity levels of the byproducts of micro-organisms. Saliva also contains Fluorides which are essential for rebuilding of the damaged tooth structure.This condition requires a visit to a dental surgeon who may advise y Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

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