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Diabetes And Sunlight

Soak Up The Sun: Catching Rays May Work Better Than Taking Vitamin D To Prevent Obesity

Soak Up The Sun: Catching Rays May Work Better Than Taking Vitamin D To Prevent Obesity

Soak Up the Sun: Catching Rays May Work Better Than Taking Vitamin D to Prevent Obesity Ultraviolet radiation suppresses obesity and symptoms of metabolic syndrome independently of vitamin D in mice fed a high-fat diet, by Geldenhuys and colleagues. Diabetes 2014;63:37593769. What is the problem and what is known about it so far? Being overweight raises your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, sleep disorders, some cancers, and many other serious health problems. Many people do not get enough vitamin D, and low vitamin D levels have been linked to obesity. One way to get vitamin D is by exposing the skin to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight. When vitamin D enters the body, it is stored in the liver and then sent into the bloodstream. Obese people have low vitamin D levels in their blood. It may be that they store more vitamin D in the higher fat content in their liver instead of sending it into the blood. Or, it could be that they exercise less and thus spend less time in the sun. It is not known whether too little vitamin D can cause obesity or metabolic syndrome (a group of conditions, including high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, high blood glucose, and excess fat in the stomach area that can lead to heart disease and diabetes). Studies looking at whether taking a vitamin D supplement can help with weight loss or help to prevent diabetes have had little success. However, there is still great interest in this question, and many researchers are trying to find the answer. Why did the researchers do this particular study? The researchers wanted to learn more about whether getting more vitamin D from sunlight or by taking a supplement can help prevent obesity and the risk factors included in metabolic syndrome. This study was done in a laborat Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

Sunlight Exposure Could Fight Type 2 Diabetes

Sunlight Exposure Could Fight Type 2 Diabetes

Sunlight exposure could fight type 2 diabetes Research finds that weight gain and the development of type 2 diabetes could be slowed down due to sunshine exposure. Scientists from Southampton, Edinburgh and Australia found that overfed mice ate less when ultraviolet (UV) light was shone on them. This UV treatment resulted in the mice displaying fewer warning signs of type 2 diabetes , such as abnormal insulin resistance and glucose levels . Nitric Oxide, a natural gas which is released by the skin after exposure to sunlight, was linked to the UV treatment, which can help people control their metabolism and slow weight gain . The same effect of the UV light was found when a cream containing nitric oxide was applied to the skin of the mice. The researchers added that vitamin D, which is produced by the body in response to sunlight, did not appear to play a role in the results. However, they also acknowledged that their results should be interpreted with caution. Mice are nocturnal animals, covered with fur, and generally not exposed to much sunlight. These findings have been met with optimism in regard to the prevention of type 2 diabetes , with moderate exposure to the sun's rays is seen as greatly beneficial. "This study in mice suggests that low doses of sunlight might help to reduce risk factors for type 2 diabetes by an effect unrelated to vitamin D , but further research is needed to see if this also applies in humans," said Dr Richard Elliott, of Diabetes UK . "We know that spending more time outdoors contributes to a healthier lifestyle in other ways, such as through exercise". Continue reading >>

Sunlight May Prevent Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Sunlight May Prevent Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

It may be that the sun doesnt just give you vitamin D, but also helps slow weight gain and control metabolism. A recent study, published in the journal Diabetes, suggests that a compound secreted by your skin after exposure to sunlight, called nitric oxide, may curb weight gain. Scientists in Edinburgh and Southampton, led by colleagues at the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth, Western Australia, found that exposing overfed mice to UV rays stifled their potential for obesity. Rubbing a cream containing nitric oxide onto their skin had the same effect. Additionally, these mice showed fewer warning signs of diabetes, such as abnormal glucose levels and resistance to insulin. Dr Martin Feelisch of Southampton University said in a press release that These observations indicate that the amounts of nitric oxide released from the skin may have beneficial effects not only on heart and blood vessels but also on the way our body regulates metabolism. More research needs to be done to see if the release of nitric oxide has the same effect on weight gain in humans as in mice, but the studys authors remain optimistic that the findings will prove beneficial, especially to children. Dr. Shelley Gorman of the Telethon Kids Institute, lead author of the study, said, "Our findings are important as they suggest that casual skin exposure to sunlight, together with plenty of exercise and a healthy diet, may help prevent the development of obesity in children." According to the American Diabetes Association, 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes, while 86 million more are at risk, many of them children. A major risk factor that contributes to the development of this disease is obesity. With moderate sun exposure, people may have the benefits not only of hampered weight gain, but of lower Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sun Protection

Diabetes And Sun Protection

It's important to take precautions with medication in the sun The sun releases UV radiation which can damage our skin and eyes, particularly when the sun is strong. When the sun is out, all of us should take certain precautions to limit over exposure to the sun. Many of us like to enjoy the sun but no-one enjoys sunburn. The NHS advise people to use a sun cream with a sun protection factor of at least 15 (SPF15 or higher). Make sure you spend time in the shade between 11am and 3pm. People on sulphonylureas (an oral antidiabetic medication ) should be aware that these tablets can increase sensitivity to the sun and should take precautions to limit overexposure to the sun. People with diabetes need to take care of their feet as diabetes can affect the nerves of the feet and can cause difficulties with healing. If cuts, burns and blisters are not able to heal, this can become dangerous in people with diabetes. It is therefore important to prevent the feet from getting damaged. People with diabetes are advised not to walk around barefoot as burns and blisters could be sustained without us realising. It is also important to wear comfortable shoes that do not rub or pinch the feet as these can lead to blisters. When out in the sun, check your feet through the day. Charity Diabetes UK advises people with diabetes to seek immediate advice from their health team if they sustain any damage to the feet. Diabetes UK also advises people with diabetes to remember to apply sun cream to the toes and top of the feet. We should all avoid looking directly into the sun, whether we have diabetes or not, as looking into the sun can lead to damage to the retina, known as solar retinopathy. Diabetes can also raise the risk of diabetic retinopathy and so those of us with diabetes should protec Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

Summer Heat And Type 2 Diabetes

Summer Heat And Type 2 Diabetes

When the hottest days of summer hit, people with type 2 diabetes need to pay close attention to their condition. Here's how to savor the season without health worries. Medically Reviewed by Lindsey Marcellin, MD, MPH Summer conjures up images of backyard barbecues, pools and beaches, street festivals, fireworks, stargazing, and more. But summer heat can add to the problems faced by people living with type 2 diabetes . In fact, studies have shown that during a heat wave, emergency room use by people with diabetes increases. And while most people with diabetes are aware that extreme heat poses a danger, they may not always know when to take precautions . If you have diabetes, the high heat and humidity of summer can be difficult for your body to manage. The Centers for Disease Control recommends caution when the heat index which combines temperature and humidity readings reaches 80 degrees Fahrenheit with 40 percent humidity. Elderly people are at particular risk, but people of all ages with diabetes should be aware of summertime dangers. These include dehydration, heat exhaustion, and foot problems. Everyone, regardless of their health status, should make sure they drink enough fluids during the summer. People with type 2 diabetes, however, face an additional challenge because when their blood sugar levels are too high, they may be passing more urine than usual which means they are losing fluids more quickly. Add sweating into the mix and you have a recipe for speedy fluid loss. Certain medications, such as metformin (Glucophage), also increase the risk of dehydration. If you are out and about on a hot summer day, make sure you have enough of these beverages on hand to stay hydrated: Also, avoid alcohol and caffeine. Alcohol and caffeinated drinks are usually okay in mo Continue reading >>

Sunlight Is Key To Fighting Childhood Obesity And Diabetes, Scots Scientists Reveal

Sunlight Is Key To Fighting Childhood Obesity And Diabetes, Scots Scientists Reveal

Soak up the sun rays to slow weight gain and control metabolism[PA] A natural gas called nitric oxide, which is released by the skin after exposure to sunlight, helps people to control their metabolism and slow weight gain. Rubbing a cream containing nitric oxide on to the skin can have the same effect, experts from the University of Edinburgh have found. The discovery could lead to a treatment that halts the progress of Type 2 diabetes, which is fuelled by obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle and costs the NHS 9billion a year. Scientists from Edinburgh and Southampton, led by colleagues at the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth, Western Australia, found applying nitric oxide to the skin of overfed mice had the same effect of curbing weight gain as exposing them to ultra-violet light. The mice displayed fewer warning signs of diabetes, such as abnormal glucose levels and resistance to insulin. The findings, published in the journal Diabetes, show the benefits of moderate exposure to the suns rays. Dr Richard Weller, senior lecturer in dermatology at the University of Edinburgh, said: We know sun-seekers live longer than those who spend their lives in the shade. Studies such as this are helping us to understand how the sun can be good for us. We need to remember that skin cancer is not the only disease that can kill us and should perhaps balance our advice on sun exposure. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide can lower blood pressure after exposure to ultra-violet lamps. Sunlight exposure could help prevent obesity in children, scientists have found [PA] These findings support the idea that a healthy lifestyle should include time outside in the sunshine, not only for exercise but also to benefit from sunlight on skin Professor David Ray, of Manchester University Dr Continue reading >>

Sunlight Exposure Could Fight Type 2 Diabetes

Sunlight Exposure Could Fight Type 2 Diabetes

Home News Sunlight exposure could fight type 2 diabetes Sunlight exposure could fight type 2 diabetes Posted on October 23, 2014 by DiabetesDigest.com Staff in News Research finds that weight gain and the development of type 2 diabetes could be slowed down due to sunshine exposure. Scientists from Southampton, Edinburgh and Australia found that overfed mice ate less when ultraviolet (UV) light was shone on them. This UV treatment resulted in the mice displaying fewer warning signs of type 2 diabetes, such as abnormal and glucose levels. Nitric Oxide, a natural gas which is released by the skin after exposure to sunlight, was linked to the UV treatment, which can help people control their metabolism and slow weight gain. The same effect of the UV light was found when a cream containing nitric oxide was applied to the skin of the mice. The researchers added that vitamin D, which is produced by the body in response to sunlight, did not appear to play a role in the results. However, they also acknowledged that their results should be interpreted with caution. Mice are nocturnal animals, covered with fur, and generally not exposed to much sunlight. These findings have been met with optimism in regard to the prevention of type 2 diabetes, with moderate exposure to the suns rays is seen as greatly beneficial. Grizzly bears provide new insights into obesity diabetes association (c) Copyright 2008-2015 OmniChannel Health Media. All rights reserved. When you register, we will send you timely reminders about upcoming Twitter chats via email. Simply enter your email address below and click on the "Register Me" button. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms. Constance Brown-Rig Continue reading >>

The Healing Sun: Sunlight And Diabetes

The Healing Sun: Sunlight And Diabetes

The Healing Sun by Richard Hobday presents evidence showing an increase in disease with a decrease in sunlight exposure. This article discusses:Sunlight and Diabetes How Sunlight Can Prevent Serious Health Problems by Richard Hobday, taken from his book, The Healing Sun According to the World Health Organization, approximately 1 35 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus worldwide. There are two main forms of the disease: insulin dependent diabetes and non-insulin dependent diabetes. The onset of insulin dependent diabetes is most common in childhood and occurs as a result of the bodys auto-immune system destroying the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. As the name implies, insulin dependent diabetes requires treatment with insulin. Non-insulin dependent diabetes is less serious and can be treated with diet, exercise, drugs which increase the production of insulin, or insulin itself. It is the more common form of the disease and accounts for almost 90 per cent of all diabetes cases. Non-insulin diabetes occurs after the age of about 40 years in people who are genetically disposed to it and who are often overweight and unfit. The World Health Organization predict that the number of people with diabetes is set to rise to 300 million by 2025 because of population ageing, unhealthy diets, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. A deficiency of insulin results in increased concentrations of glucose in the blood which, in turn, causes damage to blood vessels and nerves. Diabetes can lead to severe complications in the longer term, including heart attacks, kidney failure, blindness, and gangrene in the lower extremities. Heart disease kills 75 per cent of people of European origin with diabetes. Studies have shown vitamin D to have a protective effect against childh Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes Let The Sunshine In

Vitamin D And Diabetes Let The Sunshine In

Vitamin D and Diabetes Let the Sunshine In Sue Penckofer , PhD, RN, JoAnne Kouba , PhD, RD, LDN, Diane E. Wallis , MD, and Mary Ann Emanuele , MD School of Nursing, Faculty Scholar, (Dr Penckofer), School of Nursing, Director of Dietetics Program (Dr Kouba), Midwest Heart Specialists (Dr Wallis), Stritch School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism (Dr Emanuele), Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois Correspondence to Sue Penckofer, Niehoff School of Nursing, Chicago, IL 60626 ( [email protected] ). The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Diabetes Educ See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Diabetes is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Persons with diabetes are at greater risk for early cardiac mortality, and for repeat events if they survive their first cardiac event. Recently, low serum concentrations of vitamin D have been associated with increased risk for cardiac events. Evidence indicates that persons with diabetes have lower serum concentrations of vitamin D. In addition, persons at risk for diabetes or metabolic syndrome have inadequate serum concentrations of vitamin D. This review will assess the evidence relative to the impact of vitamin D in the development of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes complications. Studies that address vitamin D and its impact on metabolic outcomes as well as possible mechanisms of action are provided. Finally, the assessment and suggested treatment for vitamin D deficiency is addressed. Effective detection and treatment of inadequate vitamin D concentrations in persons with diabetes or those at risk for diabetes may be an easy and cost-effective therapy which could improve their long-term health outcomes as well as their quality of life. Proper Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes By Catching Sunlight

Prevent Diabetes By Catching Sunlight

Prime Minister Theresa May (R) speaks to Diabetes UK volunteers and staff members at their new office on November 14, 2016 in London, England. Mrs May, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes while Home Secretary, officially launches the new Diabetes UK office today to coincide with World Diabetes Day. (Photo : Jack Taylor WPA Pool/Getty Images) By Mandy Adams , Dec 23, 2016 10:55 AM EST Source: iTechPost Catching some rays is not just god for your bones. It can also help prevent diabetes. A new research suggests that sufficient amounts of vitamin D in the body can make you less prone from diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. Of all the diseases that are affecting people today, diabetes and heart disease are two of the leading causes of death today. Luckily, there are ways to prevent these diseases and it includes a healthy diet and making sure that you are getting enough vitamin D. Sunlight is one of the top sources of this vitamin which means that catching some rays on a regular basis will not just make your bones and teeth stronger, it can also make your heart stronger and improve your bodys ability to regulate blood sugar. Being two of the most common ailments that plague modern man, extensive research has been conducted on diabetes and heart disease. These two are linked to high cholesterol levels, increase in blood sugar levels and high blood pressure. Most people who are diagnosed with the condition also have fatty liver. A diet which is mostly carbohydrates and fat could be to blame. However, a new research published in Frontiers in Physiology journal suggests that these conditions could also be linked to vitamin D deficiency which affects at least 30 percent of the population. Vitamin D could benefit people who want to prevent heart disease and diabetes Continue reading >>

New Study: Sunlight May Help Prevent Diabetes And Obesity

New Study: Sunlight May Help Prevent Diabetes And Obesity

New Study: Sunlight May Help Prevent Diabetes and Obesity New study suggests that sunlight exposure can slow down the development of obesity and diabetes. Researchers of the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth, Western Australia, together with their colleagues from the Universities of Edinburgh and Southampton, found that mice that had consumed large amounts of food experienced a deceleration in weight gain, when exposed to ultraviolet radiation. The experimental animals showed fewer warning signs of diabetes, such as abnormal glucose levels and insulin resistance. At the same time, vitamin D, which is produced by the body after exposure to sunlight and has been shown by numerous studies to have many beneficial health properties, did not appear to play a role against diabetes and weight gain. According to Dr. Shelley Gorman, lead author of the study from the Telethon Kids Institute, these findings are important as they suggest that casual skin exposure to sunlight, together with plenty of exercise and a healthy diet, may help prevent the development of obesity in children. The benefits of sunlight exposure were associated with nitric oxide, which is produced by the skin after exposure to ultraviolet rays. The researchers came to this conclusion when it was found that the application of a cream containing nitric oxide to the skin of the mice had the same effect of reducing the weight gain as the exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The researchers write in the journal Diabetes, where the study was published , that the new findings add to previous research, which suggests that exposure to sunlight can have significant health benefits. Previous studies have concluded that nitric oxide can lower blood pressure in people after exposure to UV lamps. Dr. Martin Feelisch, Professor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Summer: How To Beat The Heat

Diabetes And Summer: How To Beat The Heat

Diabetes and summer: How to beat the heat You're smart to be thinking ahead. If you have diabetes, you're at greater risk of heat exhaustion, which occurs when you're exposed to high temperatures for a long period of time and don't replace the fluids you lose. Follow these tips to stay safe in hot weather: Prevent dehydration. Both hot weather and high blood sugar can cause dehydration. So it's doubly important that you drink plenty of fluids throughout the day. Water is best. Avoid alcohol, sugary beverages and sports drinks. Protect yourself from the sun. The heat index can be up to 15 F (9 C) higher in full sunlight. Stay in the shade as much as possible when you're outside. Wear a hat and sunscreen too. Wear light, loose-fitting clothes. When humidity is high, your sweat can't evaporate as well. Wear clothing that allows sweat to evaporate easily. Plan outdoor activities to avoid the heat. Schedule outdoor activities during the cooler hours of the day, such as early morning or late evening. Alternatively, consider walking in a shopping mall or department store. Check your blood sugar. When you're out in the heat, consider testing your blood sugar more often. Peggy Moreland (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 11, 2018. Managing diabetes in the heat. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed April 11, 2018. Continue reading >>

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

The results weren't all bad. "Most patients incorporated appropriate personal protective measures such as staying indoors, drinking additional fluids on schedule, applying sunscreen, and wearing protective clothing," says Adrienne A. Nassar, MD, a third year resident at Mayo Clinic Arizona, who presented the findings at ENDO 2010 in San Diego, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. But the respondents fell short in other ways. For instance, one in five waited until temperatures were over 100 degrees before taking precautions, Nassar said at a news conference And 23% began drinking fluids when they got thirsty -- typically too late to prevent dehydration effectively. Many left their medications and monitoring equipment at home during a heat wave. Nassar and her colleagues analyzed responses of 152 people with diabetes living in Phoenix, where the average July temperature is 107 F. On average, the patients were 64 years old, 85% had type 2 diabetes, and 77% were on insulin injections or pumps. Their blood glucose test results on the hemoglobin A1c tests were on average 7.9%, although the goal for those with diabetes is 7%. While many respondents protected their medication in the heat by carrying it in a cooler, 37% left medication or supplies at home. "This is quite concerning,'' Nassar says, "because they would not have the means to check their blood sugar" if they became faint, for instance. While most respondents, 72%, knew about the effect of heat on insulin, just 40% said they had gotten information from their health care providers about the ill effects of high temperature on oral medications, 41% on glucose monitors, and 38% on glucose monitoring strips. The point at which respondents said they would take protective measures varies. Nassar can't pinpoint an ex Continue reading >>

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