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Diabetes And Styes

Styes And Acne | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Styes And Acne | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I diagnosed myself with diabetes in February and immediately went on a diet to reduce carbs, salt and fat while the NHS assured themselves of the diagnosis. Since then have had styes, acne (which I've had for years on and off) and have a bloodshot eye which I fear is retinopathy though the NHS don't seem very concerned about it although they are arranging an appointment for an eye check. I can't find any information anywhere about the timescale of any improvement of these symptoms. As I understand it haemoglobin has a life span of 3 months and glucose attaches to it so it would seem logical that as time passes toward the 3 months the haemoglobin with the high glucose will be dying off and will be replaced by ones without high glucose. However, there is little sign of any improvement after 2 months. The NHS don't want me to test because of cost so I bought my own kit but have only been testing for a couple of weeks. Rates are between 3.6 - 5.2 which I don't think class as high. Does anyone have any idea how soon I could expect improvement and if reduction of blood glucose slows progression of retinopathy? Sorry to bother you all but I'm unable to find information anywhere. A stye or hordeolum is a small, painful lump on the inside or outside of the eyelid. It is actually an abscess filled with pus and is usually caused by a staphylococcus bacteria eye infection. Styes are common with most people experiencing one or two of them at some stage in their life. Acne, medically known as Acne Vulgaris, is a skin disease that involves the oil glands at the base of hair follicles. It commonly occurs during puberty when the sebaceous (oil) glands come to life - t Continue reading >>

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Diabetes is a disease in which your body cannot produce enough insulin, cannot use insulin, or a mix of both. In diabetes, sugar levels in the blood go up. This can cause complications if left uncontrolled. The potential health consequences are often serious. Diabetes raises the risk of cardiovascular disease and can cause problems with your eyes, skin, kidneys, and nervous system. Diabetes can also cause erectile dysfunction (ED) and other urological problems in men. Fortunately, many of these complications are preventable or treatable with awareness and attention to your health. Diabetes Symptoms Early symptoms of diabetes are often undetected because they may not seem that serious. Some of the mildest early diabetes symptoms include: frequent urination unusual fatigue blurred vision weight loss, even without dieting tingling or numbness in hands and feet If you allow diabetes to go untreated in these early stages, complications can occur. These complications include issues with your skin, eyes, and nerves (including nerve damage, or neuropathy). Watch out for bacterial infections in your eyelids (styes), hair follicles (folliculitis), or fingernails or toenails. Additionally, make note of any stabbing/shooting pains in your hands and feet. All of these are signals that you may be experiencing complications from diabetes. Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection. It can be a symptom of many health issues, including high blood pressure, stress, smoking, medication, kidney disease, and circulatory or nervous system conditions. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, men with diabetes are at risk for ED. The organization states that 20 to 75 percent of men with diabetes have erectile dysfunction. Continue reading >>

The Anterior Segment Of The Eye In Diabetes

The Anterior Segment Of The Eye In Diabetes

The anterior segment of the eye in diabetes 1Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria 2Ophthalmology Department, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria Correspondence: CO Adeoti, Department of Ophthalmology, College of Health Sciences, PO Box 979, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria, Tel +234 80 3374 2827, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2012 Adeoti et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A prospective study to examine the anterior segment of the eye in patients with diabetes mellitus. The anterior segments of the eyes of 181 patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. The commonest finding in the lids was warts, followed by poliosis and chalazia, and, in the conjunctiva, tortuous conjunctival vessels inferiorly (36.50%), pterygium (14.92%), and pingueculum (14.37%). Corneal sensitivity was reduced in 25 (13.80%) patients. Iris atrophy was the commonest finding in the iris. Dilatation of the pupil was delayed in 34 (18.79%) patients. Cataract was found in 119 (65.75%) patients. Forty-one (22.65%) patients had intraocular pressure greater than 21 mmHg. Seven (3.87%) patients, four (2.21%) patients, and one (0.55%) patient had seventh, third, and fourth palsy, respectively. No patient had sixth nerve palsy. Primary care physicians and other allied health care professionals who are first in contact with patients are enjoined to familiarize themselves with the anterior segment features of diabetes mellitus and take necessary action when they are detected. Keywords: diabetes m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. This condition causes progressive damage to the retina, the light-sensitive lining at the back of the eye, and if left untreated can potentially cause blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can develop in anyone who has type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. The longer a patient has had diabetes and the less controlled the blood sugar, the more likely one is to develop diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms include: Seeing spots or floaters in your field of vision Blurred vision Having a dark or empty spot in the center of your vision Difficulty seeing well at night Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the inability of the body to use and store sugar properly, resulting in high blood sugar levels. It results in changes in the body's veins, arteries and capillaries which in turn affect the body's ability to produce the insulin needed to control blood sugar levels. How Diabetes affects vision? Diabetes may cause: Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (NPDR) NPDR is also called background diabetic retinopathy and is the earliest stage of diabetic retinopathy. With NPDR, damaged blood vessels in the retina leak extra fluid and small amounts of blood into the eye. Cholesterol or other fat deposits from blood, called hard exudates, may leak into retina. With NPDR, your central vision is affected by any of the following: Hard exudates on the central retina (macula) Microaneurysms (small bulges in blood vessels of the retina that often leak fluid) Retinal hemorrhages (tiny spots of blood that leak into the retina) Macular edema (swelling/thickening of macula) Macular ischemia (closing of small blood vessels/capillaries) Click here to view a vision simulator for patients experiencing sympto Continue reading >>

Recurrence Of Styes? Does That Mean I Have Diabetes?

Recurrence Of Styes? Does That Mean I Have Diabetes?

HealthBoards > Vision > Eye & Vision > Recurrence of styes? Does that mean i have diabetes? Recurrence of styes? Does that mean i have diabetes? Recurrence of styes? Does that mean i have diabetes? 8-9 months ago I got hit by a soft spikey ball inside the eye. A month or two later I had watery eyes, a feeling of a foreign particle in my eye etc so I went to the doctor and after observing my eye, he found that there was a pimple inside the eyelids. He gave me some eye droppers and after a day my eye was good. Until yesterday, 6 months after first getting this thing in my eye, i'm having the same symptoms again. I looked around the net and found styes so I think I might have that. I know that you can't diagnose yourself over the net and all, but I think i do have this. I was scared to read that people with diabetes get this, so does that mean that I have diabetes as well? I've experienced some symptoms associated with diabetes. Have I got diabetes or is there another cause of these styes? I'd like to mention that I've put some moisturizer on, near the eyes both time i have got these styes so could it be possible that the styes are caused by the neutrogena moisturizer? For diabetes, I'm not obese or anything as such but I do have some of the sytmptoms such as always thirsty, especially after eating chocolate or food etc? So what do you guys think? Because I have had a recurrence of the stye, does that mean i have diabetes? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetic Retinopathy

What is Diabetes Mellitus? Diabetes mellitus, or simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar) levels, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. There are three main types of Diabetes Mellitus (DM): Type 1: This results from not making insulin. Type 1 diabetics need insulin, either by self-injection or using an insulin pump. Type 2: This results from insulin resistance, where cells fail to use insulin properly. This is sometimes accompanied by reduced insulin secretion. Patients are treated with diet, exercise, oral medication, or a combination. Type 3: Gestational Diabetes: Diabetes occurring during pregnancy. How is Diabetes Mellitus diagnosed? Diabetes may have symptoms in some people, and no symptoms in others. Generally, Type 1 diabetes presents with increased thirst (polydipsia), frequent urination (polyuria), and increased hunger (polyphagia). Symptoms may develop over weeks to months. Untreated, this condition may cause a person to lose consciousness and become very ill (diabetic ketoacidosis). Left untreated, glucose can absorb into the lens of the eye, leading to temporary changes in lens shape and vision changes, including blurred vision. Types 2 and 3 diabetes may have minimal symptoms. A single, elevated blood glucose measurement can make a diagnosis, or it may require either single or multiple measurements of blood glucose to determine the degree of impairment of glucose metabolism. Your doctor is the person to help you determine if you might have diabetes. How is Diabetes Mellitus treated? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease for which there is treatment but no known cure. Treatment is aimed at keeping blood glucose le Continue reading >>

An Overview Of The Eye In Diabetes

An Overview Of The Eye In Diabetes

Anil Negi , MD MRCOphth and Stephen A Vernon , DM FRCOphth Eye and ENT Centre, University Hospital, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK Copyright 2003, The Royal Society of Medicine This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The three papers in this symposium are based on presentations to an RSM meeting on the Diabetic Eye, held on 9 April 2003. The matter is particularly topical because the National Service Framework for Diabetes calls for a high-quality retinal screening programme. After a review of the various ophthalmic conditions likely to be encountered in diabetic patients (A Negi, S A Vernon) we proceed to the most important, diabetic retinopathy, with a discussion of screening methods (D M Squirrell, J F Talbot) and an account of laser treatments (J G F Dowler). Colour versions of the clinical photographs are available online [ www.jrsm.org ]. Publication was coordinated by Professor Susan Lightman, of Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK. Diabetes is one of the world's greatest health challenges and its prevalence appears to be increasing. In the UK some 1.4 million people are known to have diabetes and the number with undiagnosed diabetes is probably similar. Of the known cases, around 200 000 are type 1 and 1.2 million type 2. 1 The increasing prevalence of obesity in the young is expected to cause an epidemic of early-onset type 2 disease in the western world, with a rise in prevalence from the 1995 figure of 51 million to 72 million in 2025. Type 1 diabetes affects young lean people (usually diagnosed at <30 years); they are insulin deficient and always need insulin. Type 2 diabetes tends to affect older obese persons (>30 years but see above); the abnormality is partial insulin deficiency, insulin resistance or both. In both types, m Continue reading >>

Eye Doctor Q And A - Diabetes And Its Effect On The Eyes

Eye Doctor Q And A - Diabetes And Its Effect On The Eyes

Q: How does diabetes affect your eyes? L.L., Connecticut A: Diabetes causes problems in the retina with what are collectively called microvascular abnormalities. The small blood vessels develop microaneurysms and leak blood. New blood vessel growth ( neovascularization ) occurs. Unfortunately, these blood vessels are weak and also leak. These leaks (hemorrhages) can cause irreversible damage to the retina and permanent vision loss. Patients with controlled diabetes do better than those with uncontrolled diabetes. However, even a person whose diabetes is under perfect control can still develop diabetic retinopathy hence, the need for yearly retinal exams. Dr. Slonim Q: Does diabetic retinopathy get progressively worse? F.R. A: Yes. When left unrecognized and untreated, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and eventually lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can even get worse despite use of the best treatments that currently exist for it. Dr. Slonim Q: My father has type 2 diabetes and he is seeing double. We went to the hospital about a week ago and they said the diabetes had affected a nerve on the right eye. Can medicine get his sight back to normal? W.C. A: Diabetes can affect any one of the three cranial nerves that are responsible for movement of the eyes. Diabetes is one of the more common conditions associated with sixth nerve (Abducens nerve) palsies. Paralysis of this nerve affects the lateral rectus muscle that allows the eye to look outward. There is no specific medicine for this. The paralysis can be temporary and last a few months or it can be permanent. Dr. Slonim Q: Can diabetes cause you to have eye infections such as pink eye and frequent styes? K.M. A: That's a great question! Yes, people with diabetes are more likely to get bacterial infections, incl Continue reading >>

Eye Stye Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | Eye Infection

Eye Stye Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | Eye Infection

Later sty symptoms can include swelling, discomfort during blinking, eye watering, and light sensitivity. A common symptom of a sty is a small, yellowish spot in the bump that develops as pus expands in the area. People with diabetes, chronic blepharitis (eyelid inflammation), seborrhea, and chronic debilitating illnesses are having more chances to have styes than the general population. Stress seems to trigger the development of a sty; those who have high blood lipid levels are more susceptible to oil gland blockages, including those in the eyelid and thus more likely to develop a sty. Warm compress or warm washcloth to the affected area four to six times a day, can speed up the sty rupture and relief its symptoms. Sty should not press / squeeze to facilitate drainage, since this can spread or worsen the infection. If a sty persists for long time, doctor lances to drain the infection under local anesthesia in their office. Antibiotic and/or steroid ointments are sometime prescribing to treat a sty. Persistent and multiple styes are treating with oral antibiotics. OTC pain medications may use for pain. Stop contact lenses and eye makeup until a total cure. Sty rarely causes complications such as chalazion, a form of scarring of the eyelid glands and formation of cysts. Chalazia can be large enough to deform the eye cornea and affects the vision, and they may cause a cosmetic problem. There is no known method to prevent sty, but being hygienic can help to prevent all forms of infection, including the sty. Other things that can help prevent sty include: Never sharing cosmetics or eye makeup tools with others, Continue reading >>

Eye Symptoms Diaclin International

Eye Symptoms Diaclin International

Dry Eye Syndrome, also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca, is one of the most common conditions diagnosed by eye doctors. If you have diabetes, you are have a significantly increased risk to suffer from this disorder. In fact, there is a study that shows that those of us with diabetes have a 50% chance of suffering from dry eye problems. Symptoms of Drye Eye Syndrom include a scratchy sensation like fine grains of sand are in the eyes, burning, itching, blurred and fluctuating vision, light sensitivity, redness and, paradoxically, increased watering of the eyes. Dry eye is almost always a condition affecting both eyes. Several kinds of bacterial infections occur in people with diabetes. One of the most common ones are styes. These are infections of the glands of the eyelid. Styes can be caused by poor hygiene,poor nutrition, a lack of sleep, or too often rubbing the eyes. This last cause is often combined with a poor hygiene. To prevent Dry Eye Syndrome and other bacterial infections of the eyes , it is important to maintain a good general hygiene. Keep your hands clean at all times and do not touch your eyes if you are not sure whether they are clean or not. Continue reading >>

Eye Stye Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | Eye Infection

Eye Stye Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | Eye Infection

Later sty symptoms can include swelling, discomfort during blinking, eye watering, and light sensitivity. A common symptom of a sty is a small, yellowish spot in the bump that develops as pus expands in the area. People with diabetes, chronic blepharitis (eyelid inflammation), seborrhea, and chronic debilitating illnesses are having more chances to have styes than the general population. Stress seems to trigger the development of a sty; those who have high blood lipid levels are more susceptible to oil gland blockages, including those in the eyelid and thus more likely to develop a sty. Warm compress or warm washcloth to the affected area four to six times a day, can speed up the sty rupture and relief its symptoms. Sty should not press / squeeze to facilitate drainage, since this can spread or worsen the infection. If a sty persists for long time, doctor lances to drain the infection under local anesthesia in their office. Antibiotic and/or steroid ointments are sometime prescribing to treat a sty. Persistent and multiple styes are treating with oral antibiotics. OTC pain medications may use for pain. Stop contact lenses and eye makeup until a total cure. Sty rarely causes complications such as chalazion, a form of scarring of the eyelid glands and formation of cysts. Chalazia can be large enough to deform the eye cornea and affects the vision, and they may cause a cosmetic problem. There is no known method to prevent sty, but being hygienic can help to prevent all forms of infection, including the sty. Other things that can help prevent sty include: Never sharing cosmetics or eye makeup tools with others, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

How Do I Know If I Have A Stye?

How Do I Know If I Have A Stye?

Styes are small abscesses that occur at the base of your eyelashes. They are fairly common and may occur on either eyelid. There are two types: internal and external styes. External styes affect the Glands of Zeis or Glands of Moll, both of which are located at the edge of the eyelid. Internal styes affect the Meibomian or tarsal glands. External styes are relatively minor but the internal ones can be severe. If you find yourself getting styes regularly, you should seek medical attention from your eye care professional. Diabetes is known to result in frequent eyelid infections. Styes are different from chalazions, which are the result of the oil glands in the eyelids becoming inflamed. Some of the most common, recognizable of a style include: The first sign of a stye is usually light-sensitivity, which is accompanied by excessive tear-production. You may also feel a gritty sensation as if there was a foreign body in your eye. The foreign body sensation will be followed by the swelling of the area at the base of the eyelid and pain in the area of the swelling. In many cases, pus will collect in the center of the stye. This gives it a similar appearance to an acne pimple. You may experience slightly blurred vision if pus from the stye starts leaking into your eye. In some cases, people with styes may also get fever. Over several days, the stye will enlarge as the infected follicle fills up with pus; usually, this swelling will take several more days to subside. You should not squeeze the swelling as this could cause the infection to spread, resulting in the formation of more styes. The infection can sometimes spread to other eyelashes, which may cause multiple styes. If this happens, or if the stye starts to drain pus into the eye, consult an eye doctor as soon as possib Continue reading >>

9 Surprising Signs Of Diabetes | Care2 Healthy Living

9 Surprising Signs Of Diabetes | Care2 Healthy Living

The symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes usually appear in subtle ways. In fact, its typical for people in the early stages of the disease to not realize theres something wrong for about 5 years before theyre diagnosed. Because diabetes can wreak havoc on your health, especially if it goes undiagnosed for too long, its important to know the signs and symptoms before it goes too far. Many of us know the most common symptomsfrequent urination, increased thirst and unusual weight loss, just to name a few. But there are plenty of other, less obvious signs that somethings not quite right. Read on for some of the most surprising symptoms of diabetes. Is your snoring keeping your spouse up at night? Excessive nighttime noise is one symptom of diabetes, and has actually be shown to be a risk factor for developing the disease. One major sleep disorder associated with snoring, obstructive sleep apnea, is a whopping nine times more common in diabetics than in the general population. People with diabetes often feel unusually cold, especially in their hands and feet. This is due to diabetic neuropathy, kidney damage that is the result of diabetes, which causes poor circulation, and thus makes it difficult for your hands and feet to stay warm. Diabetes isnt just a disease of the body, its also a disease of the mind . The low glucose levels that are a hallmark of diabetes can cause all sorts of mental issuesincluding anxiety, apathy, moodiness, impaired judgement and, yes, irritability. Most of us havent wet the bed since we were littlebut people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more prone to this embarrassing nighttime leakage. Frequent urination is a common symptom of diabetes and peeing in your sleep isnt necessarily an exception. Poor vision and blindness are often associated with Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Gets Complicated

When Diabetes Gets Complicated

Home About us Remarkable You Prediabetes & diabetes When diabetes gets complicated The far-reaching, collateral damage diabetes causes if left untreated The American Diabetes Association estimates that there are 29 million people with diabetes in the United States and that 8 million of those people are living with the disease undiagnosed. Living with undiagnosed or poorly managed diabetes is particularly dangerous, said Catherine Rolih, MD, an endocrinologist with Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center. Diabetes increases your risk for a lot of very serious health problems. From head to toe, the list of possible diabetes complications is a long one, but Dr. Rolih says that with help from your doctor it doesnt have to be so scary. The good news is that with treatment and lifestyle changes, many people are able to offset or delay many of the most severe complications, she said. Here are some of the most common complications associated with diabetes and ways that patients can help prevent them: Eyes - According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are 40 percent more likely to develop glaucoma, or increased eye pressure, and 60 percent more likely to develop cataracts, a condition that clouds the lens of the eye. They are also at risk to develop diabetic retinopathy, which is caused by damage to the blood vessels in the eye. All three conditions can result in vision loss in their most severe stages. Its important for patients with diabetes to make an annual eye doctor visit part of their overall care plan, and to make note of any major changes to their vision, said Dr. Rolih. Skin - Common skin infections, including styes, boils and fungal infections, are more likely to affect people with diabetes than those without, but being diabetic can cause some u Continue reading >>

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