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Diabetes And Sinus Congestion

Managing Symptoms Of The Common Cold In People With Diabetes

Managing Symptoms Of The Common Cold In People With Diabetes

In the midst of the cold season, you may wonder how to care for yourself when you come down with an illness. And, for example, what non-prescription medications are safe to provide relief for sore throat, runny nose and cough. In one of my previous blogs - Managing diabetes when someone is ill - there are some useful tips on how to manage diabetes during illness. On the shelves of local pharmacies, many non-prescription medications that provide symptomatic relief to the common cold list diabetes as a caution to their use. This is done to alert the user that some common ingredients found in these non-prescription medications can also raise blood glucose. Since illness causes the body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, the best option is to choose those products that have minimal effect on blood glucose levels. Simple and topical remedies can be very effective Gargling with salt water or sucking on throat lozenges can provide relief to sore throat. If concerned about the sugar from the throat lozenges, look for those that are “sucrose free”. Nasal saline solution can help clear the sinuses and stuffy nose. There are many nasal sprays/drops or nasal rinses available. Some examples are: hydraSense®, NeilMed®, NasalMist® Simple is best for cold medicines Keep it simple. Choosing a non-prescription medication based on the types of ingredient proven to relieve the particular symptom is better than choosing one with multiple ingredients. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all that is needed to treat the symptom. Choose the better dosage form Non-prescription remedies in pill form are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one Continue reading >>

Sugar's Effects On The Sinuses

Sugar's Effects On The Sinuses

Christine Garvin is a certified nutrition educator and holds a Master of Arts in holistic health education. She is co-editor of Brave New Traveler and founder/editor of Living Holistically... with a sense of humor. When she is not out traveling the world, she is busy writing, doing yoga and performing hip-hop and bhangra. MRI Xray of human sinuses. Sinus issues may be stemming from excessive sugar intake.Photo Credit: Photoprofi30/iStock/Getty Images Sugar is found in a wide variety of foods ranging from breakfast cereals to salad dressings. In fact, the average American consumes over 30 tsps. of refined sugar daily, according to registered dietitian Sandra Woodruff in her book, "The Complete Diabetes Prevention Plan." This is on top of the large consumption of high carbohydrate foods such as white bread, rice and baked goods. The impact of sugar on the human body is still up for debate, but more and more health professionals believe it has a detrimental effect on the immune system, causing issues ranging from fatigue to long-term sinus issues. Sinusitis is one possible effect of sugar on the sinuses, according to Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., in his book, "Beat Sugar Addiction Now!" Usually this has to do with the growth of fungal yeast that is fed by sugar, which in turn causes an inflammatory reaction in the sinuses. The inflammation then creates swelling, which blocks the drainage from the nose and sinuses. Sinusitis is often treated with antibiotics, but this makes the yeast overgrowth worse, which can lead to chronic sinusitis, maintains Teitelbaum. One way to fight against sinusitis is to cut down sugar intake tremendously or remove it altogether. Dr. Robert S. Ivker states in his book, "Sinus Survival," that sugar weakens the immune system, which leads to higher poss Continue reading >>

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

It is that time of year again and as a Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator one of the most common questions over the fall, the holiday’s and winter months is “What do you have to treat my cold?” or simply “Can you make me feel better?” Well there is no cure and we cannot wave our “therapeutic” wand and make symptoms disappear but there are a variety of products to help with the symptoms of cough and cold. If the patient is relatively healthy it may be a bit of a hit or miss scenario but usually the product will ease the symptoms until the cold runs its course over 7 to 10 days. The picture becomes less clear when the patient is taking other medications, has medical conditions such as kidney disease, blood pressure, or they have diabetes. Assisting our patient choose an appropriate product that will not worsen their existing medical conditions, and lessen the symptoms that make them feel miserable is key. Diabetes is a condition that requires some adjusting to choose the right product. It is not always a “Sugar free”, “Natural”, or alternative product that is best, as active ingredients may have issues. These include raising blood sugars, raising blood pressure or stressing the kidneys (common issues with diabetes). Usually after a brief discussion to educate the patient, a product can be chosen to help both their symptoms and minimally impact their diabetes and blood sugars. The discussion that follows is a practical approach on how to decide what a person with diabetes can use so that they understand why we avoid certain classes of products due to a their existing medical conditions. Blood Sugars Can Rise when Ill It is important to realize that when a person with diabetes is “fighting” a cold it produces stresses on the body as a whole and Continue reading >>

Will You Have Nasal Congestion With Type 2 Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Will You Have Nasal Congestion With Type 2 Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Type 2 diabetes and Nasal congestion - from FDA reports Nasal congestion is found among people with Type 2 diabetes, especially for people who are female, 60+ old, take medication Byetta and have High blood pressure. This review analyzes which people have Nasal congestion with Type 2 diabetes. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 353 people who have Type 2 diabetes from FDA , and is updated regularly. 353 people who have Type 2 Diabetes and Nasal Congestion are studied. Gender of people who have Type 2 Diabetes and experience Nasal Congestion *: Age of people who have Type 2 Diabetes and experience Nasal Congestion *: Top co-existing conditions for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol: 21 people, 5.95% Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit): 80 people, 22.66% Blood Glucose Increased: 75 people, 21.25% Nasopharyngitis (inflammation of the nasopharynx): 66 people, 18.70% Nasal Discharge (discharge from nose): 65 people, 18.41% * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. Do you have Nasal congestion with Type 2 diabetes? Print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Type 2 diabetes can be treated by Metformin, Metformin hydrochloride, Januvia, Glipizide, Victoza ( latest reports from 199,001 Type 2 diabetes patients ) Nasal congestion (blockage of the nasal passages usually due to membranes lining the nose becoming swollen from inflamed blood vessels) has been reported by people with rheumatoid arthritis, primary pulmonary hypertension, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, psoriasis ( latest reports from 33,893 Nasal congestion patients ). Drugs that are associated with Nasal congestion Support group for people who have Nasal Congestion (174 members) A s Continue reading >>

Fed Up With Being Stuffed Up: Help For Nasal Congestion

Fed Up With Being Stuffed Up: Help For Nasal Congestion

Fed Up with Being Stuffed Up: Help for Nasal Congestion Greta M. Pelegrin, PharmD, and Gabriela Girola, PharmD Candidate Nasal congestion (or "stuffy nose") is probably the most common symptom of a cold or allergies. The nasal passages are inside the nose and are lined with membranes that have many arteries, veins, and capillaries. When irritants or "foreign invaders" come into contact with the nasal linings, the blood vessels ofthe nose expand, and the membranes fill with excess blood, resulting in redness, swelling, and stuffiness. This swelling makes it hard to breathe because it blocks the normal flow of air. What Impact Does Nasal Congestion Have on Our Lives? Nasal congestion may be caused by the common cold or flu, seasonal or chronic allergies, or even a sinus infection. Nasal congestion can cause minor problems, such as dry mouth and a sore nose, and more serious issues, such as problems with hearing. The most bothersome problem associated with nasal congestion may be how it can interfere with our ability to get a good night?s sleep. Poor sleep caused by congestion, swelling, and an inability to breathe adequately at night has serious consequences. It can result in accidents, both at school and at work or while driving. Inadequate sleep has been linked to a decrease in physical and mental performance, as well as an increase in memory lapses and behavior and mood problems.1-4 Fortunately, many treatment options are available for nasal congestion. A nasal aspirator for children can help clear mucus. Nasal moisturizers and nasal sprays with saline usually are safe for use in children, pregnant women, and the elderly. Increasing the humidity of the air with vaporizers or humidifiers also can be helpful, and a menthol product can be added to the vaporizer to reduce Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Chronic Rhinosinusitis And Sinus Surgery Outcome

The Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Chronic Rhinosinusitis And Sinus Surgery Outcome

The effect of diabetes mellitus on chronic rhinosinusitis and sinus surgery outcome Zi Zhang , MD, MSCE,1 Nithin D. Adappa , MD,3 Ebbing Lautenbach , MD, MPH, MSCE,1,5 Alexander G. Chiu , MD,2 Laurel Doghramji , RN, BSN,3 Timothy J. Howland , BS,3 Noam A. Cohen , MD, PhD,3,4 and James N. Palmer , MD3 1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 3Department of OtorhinolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 4Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 3Department of OtorhinolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 4Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Correspondence: Zi Zhang, MD, MSCE, Address: 8th Floor, Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021, Telephone number: 215-573-6625; Fax number: 215-573 Continue reading >>

Sinus Infections With Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Sinus Infections With Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

I have had a sinus infection on the right side of my head for two months. I am currently on my third antibiotic and in the care of an ENT. I am concerned that the doctors are not taking my T2 diabetes into account during my treatment. I was on Ceftin for 10 days which almost cleared the problem up, but a few days after the antibiotics ran out the headaches and pain/stuffiness came back. Then I was put on Avelox for 14 days and it did little or nothing to my symptoms. Now two weeks later I am on Omnicef for 10 days. It seems to be knocking out the symptoms, but I am afraid that in a couple weeks after the drugs run out I will be in the same situation with pain and terrible headaches. Anyone out there with similar experience or advice? glad your symptoms have improved. I hope something will knock it out soon. I know how you feel. I have chronic sinusitus my allergy doc said years ago. I suffered for many years with several sinus infections per year, started with one, then two then three each year, until I finally went to the ENT. I hope you don't go down that road. He put me on a regimen on a prescription nasal spray and Claritin, worked well for a few years, now he has me on Zyrtec in the morning, Singulair at night, works great for me, have not had an infection in about two years. Sorry about those headaches, I never had them too bad, sometimes I had them sometimes not, sometimes fever but usually no fever. My main thing was all the congestion, just a yucky sick feeling, did not want to do anything, and awful sore throat, sometimes coughing a lot. I hope they are taking your diabetes seriously. He asked me if I wanted a shot once, after I was diagnosed, told me it would raise my BS, I said no thanks. I had a sinus infection and bronhitis for almost 4 months. Antibiotic Continue reading >>

Nasal Congestion

Nasal Congestion

Not a clue here, AZ . . . what I CAN tell you is that MY lifelong nasal congestion (allergic rhinitis) subsided after I had surgery for a retinal detachment! I haven't needed pseudoephedrine OR oxymetazoline since the middle of November! Isn't it heavenly to be able to breathe?! I envy the two of you. I'm using insulin and I'm still congested. And I don't have the need to have my retina reattached. Hope I never will. I can't stand the thought of having surgery on either eye I guess I'll have to live with congestion, and be excited for the two of you for finding relief. I will say that I'm certain I started experiencing my nocturnal congestion issues when I started experiencing my earliest diabetes symptoms. Though I had been abusing pseudoephedrine as a stimulant for quite a while, so I wonder if I gave myself some pernicious variant of rhinitis medicamentosa, where you continually need a decongesting agent to remain decongested all the time. Usually this disorder occurs with topical nasal sprays, but I wonder if oral bronchiodialators can have the same effect if they're used inappropriately long enough? Of course, because my doctor thinks my rhinitis is happening because I'm overweight (???!!!), so there's going to be no help even in the form of helpful information from that quarter, methinks. This is something I have brought up with a few doctors but no one has been able to see a connection. However I had horrible nasal congestion for months. And amazingly it disappeared right when I was diagnosed and started taking insulin to bring my blood sugars had come back down to normal. any ideas? I see you are type 1, which I don't know much about, but I do know type 1's have highs and lows. One of the symptoms of low blood sugar is nasal congestion, so it makes sense that o Continue reading >>

13 Sneaky Causes Of Sinus Trouble

13 Sneaky Causes Of Sinus Trouble

Sinus infection relief Sinus infections, the cause of untold misery, strike about 37 million people in the U.S. each year. On the surface of things, the cause of sinus trouble is clear. Teeny holes that connect your nasal passages to your sinuses (basically a collection of hollow, moist cavities that lurk beneath your nose, eyes, and cheeks) get blocked. Then gunk builds up in your sinuses, germs may grow, and you feel, well, hideous. But the cause of the blockage is sometimes trickier to figure out. Here are 13 things that can cause an acute sinus infection (the most common type) and, in some cases, lead to a chronic sinus infection. Viruses Most sinus infections start with a cold. Colds are caused by a virus, which can make nasal tissue swell, blocking the holes that normally drain sinuses. If your sinus infection is caused by a virus, antibiotics won’t help since these drugs kill only bacteria. Your symptoms will probably get better after about a week or so. A decongestant can help, but don’t use it for more than four or five days to avoid becoming dependent. The best defenses against these sinus infections are the same things that protect against colds and the flu. In other words, get a flu shot, wash your hands, and don’t chill with the visibly ill. Allergies Because inflammation can block the nasal passages and prevent draining, allergies are often associated with sinus infections. In fact, studies have shown that people with sinus infections who have allergies tend to have more extensive sinusitis, says Sonia Bains, MD, assistant professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy, and Sleep Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. If you’re prone to allergies or hay fever, avoid things that trigger allergic reactions, such as dust Continue reading >>

Rhinopathy

Rhinopathy

Not all nasal symptoms of nasal congestion, drainage and obstruction are caused by inflammatory conditions of the nose. Noninflammatory nasal conditions are best classified as rhinopathy, while inflammatory nasal conditions are called rhinitis . Hyper-reflexive rhinopathy (HR) is a relatively common condition of the nasal lining. The fundamental cause is an excess of input from the parasympathetic nervous system; this leads to excessive production of nasal secretions and to a lesser extent nasal congestion. HR is commonly called vasomotor rhinitis (VMR), but this terminology is incorrect, since the cause is not inflammatory as the name VMR suggests. HR is a common cause of non-specific complaints of post-nasal drip, especially in older adults. Symptoms of HR may also occur in association with eating in a condition known as gustatory rhinopathy. Before the diagnosis of HR is given, it is important to exclude other potential causes of the nasal symptoms; thus, patients will usually undergo nasal endoscopy, CT scan and sometimes allergy testing. Rhinitis medicamentosa (RM) refers to the development of rebound nasal congestion in association with chronic use of topical nasal decongestants. This nasal congestion is quite profoundRM patients often report that they have no nasal airflow whatsoever. At presentation, RM patients will report that they started using topical nasal decongestants occasionally, but that over time, they required more and more topical nasal decongestant for less and less effect. In essence, they are addicted to the topical nasal decongestants. Other rhinopathy conditions are relatively uncommon: Endocrinal rhinopathy is the nasal manifestation of an underlying abnormality of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism can lead to a reduction of activity of th Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Treating A Blocked Nose Due To A Cold

Treating A Blocked Nose Due To A Cold

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community At the moment I have got a bad cold my nose is streaming and is totally blocked up. I hardly slept the last couple of nights because of this and even eating is difficult with a blocked nose.. As I take blood pressure tablets I must not use decongestants so does anyone here have a remedy that works for unblocking the nasal passages that does not involve decongestants or know of anything available at the chemist that I could use Oddly enough, I came down with a bad case of lurgy last weekend after a flu jab Saturday morn... My focus has been on a realy bad & annoying cough..? To deal with this I've been drinking hot water with sliced lemon. Oddly enough it keeps the cough at bay, rehydrates me, & has made the bunged up nasal cavities easier to clear... My personal view on decongestants are they alway seem to dry my head to the point, any mucus is harder to shift? It's worth mentioning "Olbas oil".. (May need cross referencing with your meds.?) A few drops in a bowl of hot water, inhaling the vapour with a towel over ones head to contain? Though for me this can be a little harsh on the throat.. Its a self limiting disease and will eventually get better. Good old fashioned steam inhaling with something menthol may help. If you have the dosh, maybe some complimentary therapies? I often suffer from a blocked nose due to recurring sinusitis. I usually go to bed with a olbas oil sprinkled onto a hanky, tucked into the neck of pyjamas. The vapour usually keeps my breathing clear u Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Nasal Congestion

Diabetes-related Causes Of Nasal Congestion

Diabetes-related causes of Nasal congestion Our information shows that 1causes of Nasal congestion are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 106total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Nasal congestion if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. The full list of all possible causes for Nasal congestion described in various sources is as follows: Drug side effect causes of Nasal congestion The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Nasal congestion as a side effect. [ See detailed list of 438drug side effect causes of Nasal congestion ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Nasal congestion: The following list of conditionshave ' Nasal congestion ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Nasal congestion or choose View All. By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use . Continue reading >>

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Spring is really starting to burst out here in Massachusetts. The tulips are blooming and leaves and buds are popping out on the trees. As pretty and welcoming as this is, many of you (about 50 million!) are probably bracing yourself for all of the pollen that is soon to follow, and suffering through the misery that it can bring. Thanks to the mild winter that we had in the Northeast, plants are pollinating earlier than usual. As if that weren’t bad enough, having seasonal allergies can also affect your blood sugar control. Seasonal allergies: do you have them? Seasonal allergies are sometimes called hay fever or, more technically, seasonal allergic rhinitis. You might be wondering if your symptoms are due to a cold, flu, or allergies. While there can be some overlap, the following symptoms are usually indicative of allergies: • Itchy eyes • Watery eyes • Dark circles under the eyes • Sneezing • Runny nose • Stuffy nose • Sore throat You might also feel a little bit tired. You won’t get a fever from allergies, however. These symptoms can linger for weeks unless they’re treated. Treating allergies There are a number of remedies for seasonal allergies, including oral medications, nasal sprays, and eye drops. It’s important that you not only choose the right one for your symptoms, but that you also are aware of how these medicines might affect your blood sugars. The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy), and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Antihistamines might be combined with a deconge Continue reading >>

Chronic Sinusitis. Symptoms And Causes Of Chronic Sinusitis | Patient

Chronic Sinusitis. Symptoms And Causes Of Chronic Sinusitis | Patient

The sinuses are small, air-filled spaces inside the cheekbones and forehead. They make some mucus which drains into the nose through small channels. Sinusitis means inflammation of a sinus. Most bouts of sinusitis are caused by an infection. The cheekbone (maxillary) sinuses are the most commonly affected. Acute sinusitis means that the infection develops quickly (over a few days) and lasts a short time. Many cases of acute sinusitis last a week or so but it is not unusual for it to last 2-3 weeks (that is, longer than most colds). Sometimes it lasts longer. Sinusitis is said to be acute if it lasts from 4-30 days and subacute if it lasts from 4-12 weeks. A mild bout of acute sinusitis is common and many people will have some degree of sinusitis with a cold. Severe acute sinusitis is uncommon. Most people only ever have one or two bouts of acute sinusitis in their life. However, some people have repeated (recurring) bouts of acute sinusitis. See separate leaflet called Acute Sinusitisfor more details . Chronic sinusitis means that a sinusitis becomes persistent and lasts for longer than 12 weeks. Chronic sinusitis is uncommon. The rest of this leaflet is just about chronic sinusitis. Most cases of chronic sinusitis develop following an acute sinusitis infection. Most cases of acute sinusitis go away within 2-3 weeks, often much sooner. In some cases the symptoms do not go and become persistent (chronic). The following are causes of acute sinusitis that may progress into a chronic sinusitis: Cold or flu-like illnesses - in most cases, acute sinusitis develops from a cold or flu-like illness . Colds and flu are caused by germs called viruses which may spread to the sinuses. The infection may remain viral before clearing, causing a viral sinus infection. In a small number Continue reading >>

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