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Diabetes And Shortness Of Breath

The 7 Most Common Diabetes-related Medical Emergencies

The 7 Most Common Diabetes-related Medical Emergencies

Rapid treatment is crucial if you're experiencing stroke symptoms.(ISTOCK)Type 2 diabetes can damage blood vessels and nerves, so just about every part of your body can be affected by the disease. Diabetes care generally focuses on day-to-day living to prevent complications, such as eating right and exercising, but it's also important for you to know how to get help if you have one of these medical emergencies. Controlling your blood sugar can lower the chances of all of the following emergencies (with the exception of hypoglycemia). You should also keep an eye on your cholesterol and blood pressure to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Amputation Tell your doctor right away if you notice any foot injuries, no matter how small, because they can rapidly lead to amputation. You may be referred to a hospital if your condition is serious. Some hospitals and centers now have "limb salvage" programs to help you keep your feet, such as New York University Medical Center; the Wisconsin Heart Hospital outside of Milwaukee; Riverside Methodist Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; and University Foot & Ankle Institute at various locations in California. Ask your doctor where you can find the best foot-saving expertise in your area. Heart attack The death rate from heart disease is two to four times higher in adults who have diabetes than those without it. You should be aware of heart attack symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and nausea; call 911 immediately if you experience them. Next Page: Hyperglycemia [ pagebreak ]Diabetes ComaIgnoring diabetes symptoms is risky Watch videoMore about diabetes complications Hyperglycemia High blood sugar can result from not taking enough insulin, eating too much, or being sick or stressed. Symptoms include excessive thirst, exce Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic nephropathy is kidney damage that occurs as a result of diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy causes illness and sometimes death for people with diabetes. Diabetes affects approximately seven percent of people in the United States. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure in the nation. People who already have diabetes are susceptible to developing diabetic nephropathy if they: are of African American, Hispanic or Native and Alaskan American origin have a family history of kidney disease or high blood pressure have poor control of blood sugar had type 1 diabetes before age 20 are a smoker Not everyone with diabetes develops chronic kidney disease, but researchers believe that those who do not properly control their blood glucose levels are at risk. The kidneys are each made up of around 1 million nephrons that remove extra fluid and wastes out from the blood. These nephrons help regulate water, salts, glucose, urea, phosphorus and other minerals. Those with diabetes have a lot of glucose that comes out in their urine. High blood sugar levels can damage the tiny blood vessels in the nephrons by thickening and scarring them so that over time they are damaged. When this happens, protein leaks through the kidneys into the urine. The nephrons are no longer able to filter properly and this is when kidneys damage can lead to kidney failure. Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy In the beginning stages of diabetic nephropathy, people may not experience any symptoms. Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy are similar to symptoms of chronic kidney disease and tend to occur in the late stages of kidney disease. These symptoms include: A metallic taste in the mouth or ammonia breath Nausea and vomiting Loss of appetite No longer wanting to ea Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

This content is created by Healthgrades and brought to you by an advertising sponsor. More This content is created or selected by the Healthgrades editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to the Healthgrades medical review process for accuracy, balance and objectivity. The content is not edited or otherwise influenced by the advertisers appearing on this page except with the possible suggestion of the broad topic area. For more information, read the Healthgrades advertising policy. A diabetes specialist, called an endocrinologist, has the right skills and insight to help you stay in control of your diabetes. Your feet. Your heart. Your kidneys. When you think of the body parts affected by diabetes, these are the ones that likely come to mind. But diabetes also affects another part of your body. And its one you use every second of your life: your lungs. If you have diabetes, youare more likely to have certain lung conditions. Diabetes also has an impact on lung function, or how well you breathe. A study published in Diabetes Care compared the health records of more than 1.8 million California residents with and without diabetes. The research found that adults with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes are: 22% more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 54% more likely to have pulmonary fibrosis, a disease in which scarring in the lungs interferes with your ability to breathe Nearly twice as likely to have been hospitalized for pneumonia If you have type 2 diabetes, youhave decreased lung function compared with people who dont have diabetes. Lung function is a measure of how well youre breathing. It also refers to how well your lungs deliver oxygen to your body. If you have type 2 diabetes, youtend to have 3% to 10% Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Cause And Treatment: Body Oxygen And How To Breathe

Diabetes Mellitus Cause And Treatment: Body Oxygen And How To Breathe

For more than 500 Russian medical doctors and thousands of their patients, the cause of diabetes mellitus is known. Each and every person with diabetes mellitus is a heavy breather, while breathing normalization reverses diabetes fast and naturally. This fact was confirmed by all five Western clinical studies that measured minute ventilation in patients with diabetes mellitus. All our students with diabetes, who normalized their breath, reversed all their symptoms and stopped taking any medication (insulin, etc.). If you click on the image, you can find a table that provides all details related to these medical studies. As a result of heavy breathing, people with diabetes mellitus have reduced blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery to vital organs and extremities of the body. According to numerous medical studies, tissue hypoxia causes poor blood glucose control and delayed insulin regulation with possible increased insulin resistance (see clinical research related to molecuular causes of diabetes mellitus). This is not a surprise since O2 is so fundamental for normal cell and organ function. Furthermore, many other chronic diseases (such as cancer, heart disease, and cystic fibrosis) and complications of diabetes mellitus have the same cause: low body oxygenation. Heavy and deep breathing in people with diabetes mellitus causes excessive CO2 losses. Hypocapnia (reduced CO2) in blood causes spasm of blood vessels and the reduced Bohr effect (less oxygen is released in tissues by red blood cells). Overbreathing decreases oxygen delivery and causes the generation of free radicals, chronic fatigue, poor sleep and many other effects. The presence of chest breathing and mouth breathing are additional common factors that worsen oxygen transport to cells and lead to more sev Continue reading >>

Is Shortness Of Breath A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Is Shortness Of Breath A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Diabetes tends to cause symptoms such as weight loss, increased appetite and increased thirst. However, breathlessness is not really a symptom. That being said, if you have poor exercise capacity, poor stamina or are overweight, you may feel breathless when you exert yourself. In rare cases, a weak heart can make you breathless. Diabetes individuals tend to get heart disease without realizing it, so you may want to get your heart checked out by your doctor. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Shortness Of Breath

Diabetes-related Causes Of Shortness Of Breath

Our information shows that 13 causes of Shortness of breath are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 1528 total causes). These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Shortness of breath if the patient has diabetes, is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Angina - breathlessness Atherosclerosis - Shortness of breath Cardiovascular Disease - shortness of breath Depression Diabetic ketoacidosis Heart attack - Shortness of Breath Heart block - breathlessness caused by fever Heart disease - shortness of breath Heart failure - breathless with exertion Melioidosis - shortness of breath Mycobacterium tuberculosis Myocardial infarction Tuberculosis - Progressive shortness of breath More Information on Diabetes All Causes of Shortness of breath The full list of all possible causes for Shortness of breath described in various sources is as follows: Abdominal Cancer - breathlessness Acarophobia - shortness of breath Accelerated hypertension - shortness of breath Accelerated silicosis - shortness of breath Achalasia - breathlessness See full list of possible disease causes of Shortness of breath Drug side effect causes of Shortness of breath The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Shortness of breath as a side effect. [See detailed list of 174 drug side effect causes of Shortness of breath] Drug interaction causes of Shortness of breath: Drug interactions may be a possible cause of Shortness of breath. Dymelor and alcohol interaction Diabinese and alcohol interaction Amaryl and alcohol interaction Glucotrol and alcohol interaction Glucotrol XL and alcohol interaction [See detailed list of 460 drug interaction causes of Shortness of breath] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Shortne Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Shortness Of Breath?

Type 1 And Shortness Of Breath?

Hi all--reaching out here because I'm at a loss. I suddenly starting having the sensation that I'm short of breath. It doesn't feel "textbook" short of breath, but more that fluttery breathy feeling I get when I have a low BG. as if I sprinted up a short flight of stairs. Sort of near the diaphragm. As if with every inhalation, there is no satiety. For the first couple of days I thought multiple times that I must be low--but this symptom, which is persistent--is happening with normal BG's. Wondering if anyone has any experience with this? And/or what it could be? Had chest X-ray done, and exam, and lungs seem fine. I did seem to have slight decreased lung capacity per the spirometer, but oxygen output is still good....May not be Diabetes related, but thought it couldn't hurt to ask. It's driving me insane! Thanks in advance. P.S. T1D, 21 years. Last A1C around 7. Hi Gina, first, I have no idea what it is. But I can say I've had similar issues all my life. For me I would describe it as if no matter how deep and complete a breath I took it just feels like I'm not getting enough oxygen. I always thought it was from chronically high BG's. I also thought it might be from high blood pressure, how is yours? I really don't know what causes it but it sure is worrisome, isn't it? I've reported the issue to my primary doctors, endos, and even my cardiologist...none of them have ever given me a reason for it other than that it's probably a symptom of my high BGs...but then again everything tends to get blamed on diabetes when you are one. I hope you can figure your issue out and get it resolved. Being that T1D isn't known to be a direct cause of pulmonary issues often, and having experienced this myself when I was younger, have you looked at the possibility of anxiety attacks? You Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

* these are more specific for ketoacidosis than hyperosmolar syndrome Everyone with diabetes needs to know how to recognize and treat ketoacidosis. Ketones travel from the blood into the urine and can be detected in the urine with ketone test strips available at any pharmacy. Ketone strips should always be kept on hand, but stored in a dry area and replaced as soon as they become outdated. Measurement of Ketones in the urine is very important for diabetics with infections or on insulin pump therapy due to the fact it gives more information than glucose tests alone. Check the urine for ketones whenever a blood sugar reading is 300 mg/dl or higher, if a fruity odor is detected in the breath, if abdominal pain is present, if nausea or vomiting is occurring, or if you are breathing rapidly and short of breath. If a moderate or large amount of ketones are detected on the test strip, ketoacidosis is present and immediate treatment is required.  Symptoms for hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are linked to dehydration rather than acidosis, so a fruity odor to the breath and stomach upset are less likely. During any illness, especially when it is severe and any time the stomach becomes upset, ketone levels should be determined. Never assume an upset stomach is due to food poisoning or the flu without determining if ketones are the cause. During any prolonged illness, ketones should be tested every 4 hours.  After ketones are formed from fat metabolism, they collect in the blood and are excreted into the urine. There are two ways to measure ketones at home: in the blood with a specialized meter, like the Precision Xtra™ , which measures both sugar and ketones in blood. This is the fastest way to tell if ketones are rising, and the best method for parents to use to quickly Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

So, what’s it like to have diabetes and asthma? Well, diabetes is a condition where the blood has high levels of sugar in it. It is normally caused by the body producing insufficient insulin. Symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst, increased urination and blurred vision. Asthma is a condition that causes patients to have trouble breathing, because of the swelling of the lungs airways. Symptoms of asthma include shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, wheezing and coughing. So, mix these two together and that is what it’s like to have both diabetes and asthma. However, there is some good news if you have one of them, because there is some light at the end of this tunnel. Is There a Link Between Asthma and Diabetes? When it comes to asthma and diabetes, is there a link between the two? Well, we discussed what the two are and their symptoms above, so now let’s look in to the connection between the two. The answer is that people who have diabetes do have higher rates of having asthma. These patients do tend to have a hard time maintaining their blood glucose levels and keeping their asthma under control. Further reading: Throughout the years, various studies have shown that people who have diabetes that is not under control or is poorly maintained, are the ones who are at a higher risk of developing asthma, because their lung functioning seems to be weaker than those that have diabetes that is properly controlled or maintained. On the reverse side, these studies also concluded that people who suffer from asthma are at a higher risk of developing diabetes and need to be careful. Reasons Steroids and Diabetes Don’t Mix Steroids are used in asthma patients to reduce the inflammation and swelling of the airways of the lungs. The most common steroids are cor Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Does Diabetes Cause Shortness Of Breath

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Does Diabetes Cause Shortness Of Breath

1 Tracheomalacia: Tracheomalacia (from trachea and Greek μαλακία, softening) is a condition characterized by flaccidity of the tracheal support cartilage which leads to tracheal collapse especially when increased airflow is demanded. The trachea normally dilates slightly during inspiration and ...Read more 5 11 12 13 24 Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

9 Signs Of High Blood Sugar You Should Never Ignore, Even If You Aren’t Diabetic

9 Signs Of High Blood Sugar You Should Never Ignore, Even If You Aren’t Diabetic

Everyone likes something a little sweet now and again, but depending on our bodies, we may have to be a little more careful when it comes to indulging than others. This caution is not just about things like weight gain or even the inflammation of the gut and candida overgrowth that eating too much sugar can cause. In fact, it’s much simpler, but can be much more dangerous to your health: it’s your blood sugar levels. Now, your body and blood need a certain amount of sugar for energy, but too much can cause serious health complications like diabetes, hyperglycemia. Too high blood sugar can also cause a host of very unpleasant symptoms, with a diabetic coma being the most severe. (This can also happen when your blood sugar is too low, but that’s another issue!) Luckily, there are lots of warning signs before a coma happens, so don’t freak out. Just be sure that you’re paying attention to what your body is telling you, and if you have existing issues with blood sugar, make sure your doctor knows all about any symptoms or changes you may have experienced. Learn the signs you that could be warning you that your blood sugar is getting too high. Obviously, if you take your blood sugar levels, then you’ll know what’s too high, but if you’ve never done it, there are also physical symptoms that you should be aware of. With some vigilance, as well as some changes to your diet and lifestyle, you can bring your levels back to normal. Just be sure to consult with a doctor before making any changes. Why Is High Blood Sugar Dangerous? If your blood sugar levels are too high, it can really wreak havoc on your body. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar can cause nerve damage, as well as damage to the blood vessels and organs. For people with Type 1 diabetes, it can also l Continue reading >>

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