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Diabetes And Shaking

I Get The Shakes

I Get The Shakes

When I was working on a story for Cafe magazine about Type II diabetes. Just so everyone knows, Type II and Type I are different. In Type I, the pancreas no longer secretes insulin. In Type II, the cells inside the body are resistant to insulin that is secreted by the pancreas. The consequences and effects are the same for both, though, although the causes are not. Moving on. I interviewed this man who was going blind because he didn’t take care of himself. The build up of sugar in the system doesn’t have to just affect the feet and heart like you hear a lot about, it can affect anything. He stopped taking his medication after a while for multiple reasons. 1. He had a pact with God and if he was supposed to have this disease, and he was supposed to die from it, so be it. This is a very Latino way of thinking, by the way. 2. He didn’t trust the doctors because they continued to mix and switch up the pills he was taking. He thought they were going to kill him. 3. He felt like he had everything under control. So, when you have high blood sugar, your body gets used to it and learns to function as is. As a Type I or Type II diabetic, the number one symptom is abnormally high blood sugar. Normally, someone’s blood sugar should be between 70-120. As a diabetic who isn’t taking care of themselves, this can shoot up to 500 and some people have been recorded at 900. That’s dangerously high. Imagine someone functioning normally at 300. When that person takes their medication, it brings it down to a normal number. When this happens in the body, it’s a lot of stress and it makes the body shake, sweat and feel faint. This man would take his medication, come down to a semi-normal level, “get the shakes” and eat a candy bar. See, the way one doctor put it, it’s scar Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Feeling Shaky | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Feeling Shaky | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community i was shaky for 3 hours this afternoon, almost back to normal, is this because of diabetes? still all new to me Were/are you able to your blood sugar levels? Give us some numbers.. it has come back again now tonight, just back from swimming To be fair you need to ask your go this question. Have you tested your bg? It's not something any of us can know for sure I'm afraid. I only ever feel shaky when my blood sugar level is low, sounds like you maybe on the verge of a hypo especially after exercise. Check ur blood sugar whenever you're getting unusual symptoms. Better to be safe than sorry x I only ever feel shaky when my blood sugar level is low, sounds like you maybe on the verge of a hypo especially after exercise. Check ur blood sugar whenever you're getting unusual symptoms. Better to be safe than sorry x To be fair Lotty. We're both T1 on insulin.. The OP is T2 taking "metformin 500mg slow release". My understanding of the drug is it inhibits "liver dump" & increases insulin sensitivity to what the pancreas is capable of...? I do agree with @RoseofSharon about the GP. Further comments are speculation without a meter reading... For all we know? It could be a "false hypo"? Due to prolonged highs & the body adjusting to normal BS levels....? No one can guess any further without some numbers. I'll tag in @catherinecherub she is T2. Hopefully chop some experience into this..? i was shaky for 3 hours this afternoon, almost back to normal, is this because of diabetes? still all new to me You are not giving us much information to go on @Chris_Tilley . What was your blood sugar reading before lunch and 2 hours afterwards? You really need to test your bloo Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The condition, which can be caused by being overweight and poor diet can cause blindness, limbs to be amputated - every week diabetes causes 150 amputations - and even kidney failure. It has even been linked to a reduce life expectancy if the condition it not managed well. People also need to ensure they look after their feet properly as high levels of blood glucose can cause foot problems. This can stop nerves working so people might not feel when they have cut their feet or burned themselves. The main symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Urinating more often than usual - particularly at night Excessive urination can be triggered by excess glucose in the blood which interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Feeling thirsty Kidneys have to work harder in people with type 2 diabetes. Puldisia is the term given to excessive thirst. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body Feeling tired Feeling tired could be a symptom of many conditions - but it can be caused in people who have low blood sugar. Itching around the penis or vagina Thrush - a yeast infection - tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Hand Tremors

Diabetics & Hand Tremors

A tremor is the most common type of involuntary movement, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Your risk for hand tremors increases with age and can also be influenced by diseases you may have, including diabetes. A sudden onset of a hand tremor may be a sign that blood glucose is too low. However, chronically high blood glucose can also cause a condition known as diabetic neuropathy, which may lead to hand tremors as well. Video of the Day There are three basic types of hand tremors: resting, kinetic and postural. A resting tremor occurs when your hand is at rest. A kinetic tremor happens when you are moving your hand and a postural tremor occurs when your hand is in a static position, other than resting. Many things may cause a hand tremor, but if you experience tremors regularly, contact your doctor to rule out an underlying and potentially serious disease. If you have diabetes and are on diabetic medications, you are at risk of becoming hypoglycemic. Experiencing shakiness, such as hand tremors, may indicate hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar falls below a safe and normal level. A blood glucose below 70 mg/dl is considered hypoglycemic and should be treated immediately. Other symptoms of hypoglycemia include fatigue, confusion, hunger, sweating and dizziness. Chronic bouts of hypoglycemia are a cause for a visit to the doctor. Your medication may not be reflective of your lifestyle, including eating and physical activity, which can cause an unsafe reduction in blood glucose. For acute treatment of hypoglycemia, eat a carbohydrate-rich snack, such as 4 oz. of fruit juice or soda, 1 tbsp. of honey or five or six pieces of hard candy. Wait 15 minutes and re-test your blood sugar. Continue with this cycle until y Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia In Treated Diabetic Dogs

Hypoglycaemia In Treated Diabetic Dogs

One of the most important complications seen in diabetic dogs on insulin treatment is an unduly low blood glucose level, called hypoglycaemia. Situations that may lead to hypoglycaemia are: Your dog receives the normal dose of insulin but has not received its normal quantity of food - it does not eat, vomits up the meal or has diarrhoea. Your dog is abnormally active, leading to abnormally high energy (glucose) use. Your dog accidentally receives a dose of insulin that is too high. Signs of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) hypoglycaemia can be fatal, so it is extremely important that you recognize these signs, which are often subtle in the early stages: restlessness trembling or shivering unusual movements or behaviour - some animals become very quiet and stop eating. muscle twitching What to do If any of the above signs are present, you will have to react quickly. Provide food immediately. If your dog refuses to eat, administer a glucose solution immediately. Glucose solution can be made from glucose powder and tap water. (It is wise always to keep a small amount of glucose solution ready for use.) One gram of glucose per kilogram body weight should be given (1 teaspoon per 5kg). Administer the solution carefully into the cheek pouch. Only do this if you are sure that your pet can swallow. Give the solution very slowly to avoid choking. A clean syringe is useful for administering glucose solution. The size of the syringe used is dependent on the size of your dog - 5ml, 10ml or 20ml. If your pet is unable to swallow normally, rub the glucose powder into the gums (especially under the tongue). BE CAREFUL THAT YOU ARE NOT BITTEN. As soon as recovery is evident, give your dog a small amount of food. Then keep an eye on your dog for several hours to ensure that the signs do Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia is a dangerous condition in which your blood sugar drops perilously low. Low blood sugar will most often make you feel shaky and weak. In extreme cases, you could lose consciousness and slip into a coma. People develop hypoglycemia for different reasons, but those with diabetes run the greatest risk of developing the condition. Glucose and Hypoglycemia Your body uses glucose as its main fuel source. Glucose is derived from food, and it's delivered to cells through the bloodstream. The body uses different hormones to regulate the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucagon, cortisol, and epinephrine are some hormones that help regulate glucose. Your body uses another hormone called insulin to help your cells absorb glucose and burn it for fuel. If your blood sugar level drops below a certain point, your body can develop various symptoms and sensations. For people with diabetes, this typically happens when blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), although the exact level may vary from person to person. Causes of Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar often happens in people with diabetes who are using insulin or other medicines that increase insulin production or its actions. Too much insulin can make your blood glucose drop too low. Low blood sugar can happen if: Your body's supply of glucose is used up too quickly. Glucose is released into your bloodstream too slowly. There's too much insulin in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Although no two people will have the exact same symptoms of low blood sugar, there are some common signs to watch out for: Sudden, intense hunger Dizziness or light-headedness Excessive sweating (often sudden and without regard to temperature) Shaking or tremors Sudden feelings of anxiety Irritability, mood swings, and Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Provoke Shaky Hands?

Why Does Diabetes Provoke Shaky Hands?

A tremor is the most common type of involuntary movement, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Your risk for hand tremors increases with age and can also be influenced by diseases you may have, including diabetes. A sudden onset of a hand tremor may be a sign that blood glucose is too low. However, chronically high blood glucose can also cause a condition known as diabetic neuropathy, which may lead to hand tremors as well. Types There are three basic types of hand tremors: resting, kinetic and postural. A resting tremor occurs when your hand is at rest. A kinetic tremor happens when you are moving your hand and a postural tremor occurs when your hand is in a static position, other than resting. Many things may cause a hand tremor, but if you experience tremors regularly, contact your doctor to rule out an underlying and potentially serious disease. Hypoglycemia If you have diabetes and are on diabetic medications, you are at risk of becoming hypoglycemic. Experiencing shakiness, such as hand tremors, may indicate hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar falls below a safe and normal level. A blood glucose below 70 mg/dl is considered hypoglycemic and should be treated immediately. Other symptoms of hypoglycemia include fatigue, confusion, hunger, sweating and dizziness. Hypoglycemia Treatment Chronic bouts of hypoglycemia are a cause for a visit to the doctor. Your medication may not be reflective of your lifestyle, including eating and physical activity, which can cause an unsafe reduction in blood glucose. For acute treatment of hypoglycemia, eat a carbohydrate-rich snack, such as 4 oz. of fruit juice or soda, 1 tbsp. of honey or five or six pieces of hard candy. Wait 15 minutes and re-test your blood sugar. Continu Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycaemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycaemia)

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycaemia or a "hypo", is where the level of sugar (glucose) in your blood drops too low. It mainly affects people with diabetes, especially if you take insulin. A low blood sugar can be dangerous if it's not treated promptly, but you can usually treat it easily yourself. Symptoms of low blood sugar A low blood sugar causes different symptoms for everybody. You'll learn how it makes you feel if you keep getting it, although your symptoms may change over time. Early signs of a low blood sugar include: feeling hungry sweating tingling lips feeling shaky or trembling feeling tired becoming easily irritated, tearful, stroppy or moody turning pale If not treated, you may then get other symptoms, such as: weakness blurred vision difficulty concentrating unusual behaviour, slurred speech or clumsiness (like being drunk) feeling sleepy seizures (fits) collapsing or passing out Hypos can also occur while sleeping, which may wake you up during the night or cause headaches, tiredness or damp sheets (from sweat) in the morning. If you have a device to check your blood sugar level, a reading of less than 4mmol/L is too low and should be treated. Treatment for low blood sugar Treating a low blood sugar yourself Follow these steps if your blood sugar is less than 4mmol/L or you have hypo symptoms: Have a sugary drink or snack – try something like a small glass of non-diet fizzy drink or fruit juice, a small handful of sweets, or four or five dextrose tablets. Test your blood sugar after 10-15 minutes – if it's 4mmol or above and you feel better, move on to step 3. If it's still below 4mmol, treat again with a sugary drink or snack and take another reading in 10-15 minutes. Eat your main meal (containing carbohydrate) if you're about to have it or Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Tremors?

Does Diabetes Cause Tremors?

Diabetes is a serious condition that is indicated by numerous symptoms. In fact, adult-onset type 2 diabetes can be very dangerous if not managed properly and can result in complications that range from being thirsty all the time to passing out. But symptoms can be even more serious; diabetes can also cause tremors. Common Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes There are many symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes. Risk of the more extreme problems , such as swollen extremities and a heightened risk of comas, shouldn't be the only reasons to realize that diabetes is a serious condition that requires immediate treatment and management. The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include increased hunger and thirst. People with this condition will feel ravenous even though they just ate and parched even though they had plenty of water. Other symptoms include weight loss, the need to urinate often, blurred vision and headaches. Sufferers might also notice fatigue and dry mouth. In rare cases, people with type 2 diabetes can pass out when their blood sugar is too high or too low. Should you experience any of these symptoms in combination, you should see your doctor immediately. Starting the right treatment plan to manage your diabetes is very important to your overall health. More Serious Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms The milder symptoms may pass people by, and they may not notice them or they may not experience them at all. However, there are several symptoms that indicate your type 2 diabetes has progressed and could pose an acute health threat. These symptoms include being slow to heal, especially in your extremities; changes in the skin, where it takes on a darkened and thickened appearance in the armpits, groin and even the neck; and itchiness of the skin. Sufferers can have frequen Continue reading >>

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause blood sugar (glucose) to be higher than normal. Many people do not feel symptoms with type 2 diabetes. However, common symptoms do exist and being able to recognize them is important. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high. The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis, talk to your doctor. They may recommend that you be tested for diabetes, which is performed with a basic blood draw. Routine diabetes screening normally starts at age 45. However, it might start earlier if you are: sedentary affected by high blood pressure, now or when you were pregnant from a family with a history of type 2 diabetes from an ethnic background that has a higher risk of type 2 diabetes at higher risk due to high blood pressure, low good cholesterol levels, or high triglyceride levels If you have diabetes, it can help to understand how your blood sugar levels affect the way you feel. Most common symptoms of diabetes are caused by elevated glucose levels. Frequent or Increased Urination Elevated glucose levels force fluids from your cells. This increases the amount of fluid delivered to the kidneys. This makes you need to urinate more. It may also eventually make you dehydrated. Thirst As your tissues become dehydrated, you will become thirsty. Increased thirst is another common diabetes symptom. The more you urinate, the more you need to drink, and vice versa. Fatigue Feeling worn down is another common symptom of diabetes. Glucose is normally one of the body’s main sources of energy. When cells cannot absorb sugar, you can become fatigued or feel exhausted. Blurred Vision In the short term, high glucose levels can cause a swelli Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia or an insulin reaction, is defined as a blood glucose level below 60 to 70 mg/dl. It is usually companied by one or more of the symptoms described below. Low blood sugars or insulin reactions can occur whenever insulin is used. Although less frequent, it can also occur with use of drugs that stimulate insulin production in Type 2 diabetes, such as Diabenese, Glyburide, Glipizide, and Starlix. Hypoglycemia symptoms vary greatly. Lows may occur with no symptoms, minor symptoms, or full-blown symptoms. They will vary from person to person and from one low to the next in the same person. A single symptom may make you aware that your blood sugar has become low, or you may suddenly become aware of several symptoms at once. Symptoms are created both by the effect of the low blood sugar on the brain and other organs, and by the effects of adrenaline and glucagon which are released in large quantities to raise the blood sugar. Anytime you suspect a low blood sugar, check it to be sure and, if you are low, raise your sugar quickly with glucose tablets or other fast carbohydrates. If you're too confused to check, eat quick carbs and check later. The faster you recognize hypoglycemia, the faster you can respond and bring the blood sugar back to normal. Keep in mind that you do not want to eat too much when you treat a low blood sugar, or you can begin a blood sugar rollercoaster. Identify the symptoms for insulin reactions so you can take action quickly. Symptoms for nighttime lows can be particularly hard to recognize. If you wake up during the night with any of the symptoms below, check your blood sugar immediately. (Or eat quick carbs and then check.) restlessness and inability to go back to sleep  People often sleep through nightti Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Why a Short List Is Not Enough Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of using insulin, and it can also occur in people who take pills that cause the pancreas to release more insulin. Pills that have this effect include the oral drugs chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, and Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), glimepiride (Amaryl), combination drugs that contain glyburide, glipizide, or glimepiride (such as Glucovance, Metaglip, Avandaryl, and Duetact), repaglinide (Prandin), combination drugs that contain repaglinide (Prandimet), and nateglinide (Starlix). It is therefore important that anyone who uses one of these drugs know what causes hypoglycemia, how to prevent it, how to recognize it, and how to treat it. Often, however, the most education a person receives on the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia is a handout listing its 10 most common symptoms. This is particularly true for adults. But, as any longtime user of insulin will tell you, such a list does not go far enough in describing how those common symptoms can feel, and it misses some important, albeit not-so-common, symptoms of hypoglycemia. This article attempts to fill in some of the blanks by describing what those common symptoms really feel like — in a variety of situations, including driving and sleeping — and by describing some less common symptoms. Once you (and your friends, coworkers, and family members) are better equipped to recognize hypoglycemia, you will be able treat low blood glucose faster and avert more severe hypoglycemia and its sometimes serious consequences. What is hypoglycemia Low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many Continue reading >>

Good Vibrations: A Bit Of Shaking Can Burn Fat, Combat Diabetes

Good Vibrations: A Bit Of Shaking Can Burn Fat, Combat Diabetes

It sounds like a crazy way to improve your health—spend some time on a platform that vibrates at about the same frequency as the lowest string on a double bass. But recent research indicates that the procedure, known as whole-body vibration, may be helpful in illnesses from cerebral palsy to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Now, a new study of obese mice reveals that whole-body vibration provides similar metabolic benefits as walking on a treadmill, suggesting it may be useful for treating obesity and type II diabetes. “I think it’s very promising,” says exercise physiologist Lee Brown of the California State University in Fullerton, who wasn’t connected to the study. Although the effects are small, he says, researchers should follow-up to determine whether they can duplicate them in humans. Plenty of gyms feature whole-body vibration machines, and many athletes swear the activity improves their performance. The jiggling does seem to spur muscles to work harder, possibly triggering some of the same effects as exercise. But researchers still don’t know how the two compare, especially when it comes to people who are ill. So biomedical engineer Meghan McGee-Lawrence of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta and colleagues decided to perform a head-to-head comparison of exercise and whole-body vibration. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. The researchers tested mutant mice resistant to the appetite-controlling hormone leptin, resulting in obesity and diabetes. McGee-Lawrence and colleagues divided their animals into three groups. One group lived in cages on a platform that shook gently for 20 Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Tremors

Does Diabetes Cause Tremors

Diabetes is a health condition, which is associated with abnormally high levels of glucose (or sugar) in the blood. It can be indicated by many signs and symptoms. Type 2 diabetes is the most dangerous form of this health condition and if not controlled properly, it can cause complications. Increased hunger and thirst are the most common signs of diabetes but there are others as well, such as weight loss, passing out, blurred vision and headaches. The patients suffering from diabetes might also experience fatigue and dry mouth. Reason behind Diabetes Tremors Diabetes has several life-threatening symptoms, like seizures and comas; it may even cause brain damage. Another sign of diabetes is the onset of tremors. There are cases, wherein the diabetic patients may experience a feeling of shakiness in hands, limbs, head or voice that they can't control. Diabetes can lead to peripheral neuropathies, nerve damage to the extremities, which can also cause hand tremors. This happens when their blood-sugar level drops drastically, below 40 mg/dl. The range of low blood sugar may vary from person to person, and the tremors start because the brain doesn't have enough sugar to control your body. Are Diabetes Tremors Similar to Parkinsonian Tremors? In some cases of diabetes, tremors are caused due to low blood sugar level. The patients experience same quiver as someone experience with Parkinson's disease in the early stages. The legs may shudder uncontrollably or the hands may tremble. In diabetes, tremors may accompany with painful and spontaneous muscle cramps. How to Cure Diabetes Tremors? To control tremor in type 2 diabetes effectively, you must consult a doctor to find a relevant treatment else it can turn to severe hypoglycemia. It is very important to manage blood-sugar level Continue reading >>

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