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Diabetes And Sex Drive

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

Editor’s note: Contains adult content Know Your Blood Sugar Levels Before and After Let’s be real. Sex is a unique form of physical exercise in that most of us usually look forward to doing it. Like any other activity that requires physical exertion, getting it on will most likely affect your blood sugar levels. If you find yourself dripping in sweat and can hear your own heartbeat, you might be really into your partner; however, there’s also a chance that your blood sugar has spiked and dropped. It’s good practice to check your blood sugar levels before, during and after you have sex — get creative and think about incorporating this into foreplay and post coital cuddling. Maintain Blood Glucose Levels In The Moment Stock Your Nightstand: Part of what makes sex fun is its unpredictability. That said, it’s important to expect the unexpected in the bedroom if you have Type 1 diabetes. Stock your nightstand with quick fix supplies, such as juice boxes, granola bars and glucose tablets. Having these things an arm’s reach away will allow you to quickly recalibrate your blood sugar if it drops during sex. Take Breaks: It’s totally reasonable to hit pause in the middle of sex if you experience fatigue and sense a drop in your blood sugar. Check your insulin and eat a snack before you get back to having fun. Listen to your body and let your partner know if you need a moment to refuel. Think About What You’re Drinking: Alcohol can play a role in dramatic drops in blood sugar levels. If you choose to mix drinking and sex, stick to white wine, champagne or other beverages with high sugar contents to keep your blood sugar in check. Consider Wearing a Continuous Glucose Monitor: Continuous glucose monitors are devices approved by the FDA that keep track of your blo Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

How Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

It's easy to pin a lagging libido on stress, depression, age, or lack of sleep. But if your sexual feelings have changed or if intercourse has become uncomfortable or nearly impossible, either as a result of chronically high blood glucose levels (an occasional high level will not cause long-term problems) or nerve problems, diabetes could be the cause. Experts estimate that 75 percent of men and 35 percent of women with diabetes experience some sexual problems due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage) to the nerves that stimulate normal sexual response. The good news: Research has shown that people can lower their risk for diabetes-related sexual problems by taking steps to control their diabetes, including: The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), a 10-year National Institutes of Health study of individuals with type 1 diabetes, found that improved diabetes control decreased the risk of developing neuropathy by 60 percent. This means the steps you can take to manage your diabetes are the same keys that open the doors to a healthy sexual relationship. What Women Should Know About Sex and Diabetes Women with diabetes may find it difficult to stimulate lubrication, experience orgasm, or even feel sexual desire due to nerve damage. These steps can reduce sexual complications and increase pleasure. Get rid of dryness: For persistent vaginal dryness, purchase a water-base vaginal lubricant over the counter from any pharmacy. You might also work on relaxing the muscles around the vagina with Kegel exercises: contracting your pelvic muscles to control the flow of urine. Lose weight: Being overweight can contribute to low self-esteem and loss of libido. A recent Duke University study found that shedding weight (17.5 percent of body weight) helped obese men and women Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes In Women: Low Sex Drive And More

Effects Of Diabetes In Women: Low Sex Drive And More

Effects of Diabetes in Women: Low Sex Drive and More From a low sex drive to yeast infections, diabetes can rob women of sexual pleasure in subtle ways. Find out how to get your groove back. Plus, test your diabetes IQ with our quiz... Not feeling in the mood? Maybe its diabetes. The chronic condition increases your risk for sexual dysfunction. In fact, nearly 50% of women with diabetes report some sort of sexual problem, says diabetes educator Janis Roszler, co-author of Sex and Diabetes: For Him and For Her , published by the American Diabetes Association . But pinpointing the source of the problem is difficult because signs of sexual dysfunction in women with diabetes arent as obvious as in their male counterparts. Women are not men without penises, says Irwin Goldstein, M.D., director of sexual medicine at Alvarado Hospital in San Diego and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Sexual Medicine. Women with diabetes may complain about being too tired or frustrated when it comes to sex. Butthe symptoms arent all in your head. Here are 6 sexual problems that diabetic women face, along with expert advice on how to solve them: Vaginal dryness is a common complaint of many women, particularly after menopause, but its one of the top sexual problems for diabetic women of all ages. It can make sex uncomfortable and sometimes painful. Low blood flow to the vagina may contribute to vaginal dryness, Goldstein says. Also neuropathy, or nerve damage, might inhibit sensitivity and orgasm, he says. But even women with superb blood glucose control and no nerve damage complain about dryness, Roszler says. Sex Rx:First, try K-Y Jelly and other over-the-counter vaginal lubricants. If these dont work, ask your gynecologist about prescription suppositories, estrogen rings or hormone balance Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems

Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems

Troublesome bladder symptoms and changes in sexual function are common health problems as people age. Having diabetes can mean early onset and increased severity of these problems. Sexual and urologic complications of diabetes occur because of the damage diabetes can cause to blood vessels and nerves. Men may have difficulty with erections or ejaculation. Women may have problems with sexual response and vaginal lubrication. Urinary tract infections and bladder problems occur more often in people with diabetes. People who keep their diabetes under control can lower their risk of the early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with diabetes can develop sexual problems because of damage to nerves and small blood vessels. When a person wants to lift an arm or take a step, the brain sends nerve signals to the appropriate muscles. Nerve signals also control internal organs like the heart and bladder, but people do not have the same kind of conscious control over them as they do over their arms and legs. The nerves that control internal organs are called autonomic nerves, which signal the body to digest food and circulate blood without a person having to think about it. The body's response to sexual stimuli is also involuntary, governed by autonomic nerve signals that increase blood flow to the genitals and cause smooth muscle tissue to relax. Damage to these autonomic nerves can hinder normal function. Reduced blood flow resulting from damage to blood vessels can also contribute to sexual dysfunction. What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to h Continue reading >>

Women, Sex And Diabetes

Women, Sex And Diabetes

Home » Related Health Issues » Women, Sex and Diabetes Related Health Issues Hypoglycaemia The Eyes and Diabetes The Kidneys and Diabetes Weight and Diet Exercise Your Heart Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetes and Coeliac Disease Stress, Anxiety and Depression The Prostate and Diabetes Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Joint and Muscle Problems Associated With Diabetes Impotence Women, Sex and Diabetes Osteoporosis – Is There A Link with Diabetes? An experience of the menopause Women, Sex and Diabetes While impotence may not receive sufficient attention in relation to men and diabetes, we rarely hear about problems relating to women with diabetes and sexual problems, yet it is a very real problem for women who suffer from it. Many women have difficulty talking to their partner about sexual difficulties and do not seek help due to shame, embarrassment or fear. As with men, there are many factors that can cause sexual problems in women –they can be psychological or physical. Stress, tiredness, anxiety, relationship problems can all affect energy levels and sexual desire. Some medical conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, MS and some prescription drugs are linked to sexual dysfunction in women. Do women with diabetes have problems that are different from women without diabetes? There are very few sources of information about this, yet sex is part of human nature and belongs to a healthy lifestyle so it is to nobody’s advantage to avoid discussing these issues. Research published in 2002 [ref 1] interviewed 120 women with Type 1 diabetes and compared them with a control group of women without diabetes. The results showed that women with diabetes reported significantly more problems with sexual dysfunction than women without diabetes, 27% compared to 15%. There was Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

Diabetes can affect sexual function, and as uncomfortable as it may sound, you may need to discuss this with your doctor (and certainly with your partner). To help you out, I have done research to bring you information about this most sensitive of subjects. First of all, having any chronic disease may in itself cause anxiety, which can result in sexual dysfunction. But having said that, it is also true that diabetics do report more sexual dysfunction than the populations at large. In his book Talking About Sex (American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1995), Derek C. Polonsky, MD states that 20% of people with diabetes, both men and women, report sexual dysfunction. Please read the following with an open mind, not looking for something bad which will happen to you or a loved one. Rather use it as a tool to make you better informed, and more able to talk to the professionals in your life who can help when you need it. As Dr. Polonsky says, "What starts out as a physical problem is compounded by the emotional reaction to it." This article is shared to help all of us deal with the physical before this occurs. Research on Diabetes and Sexual Dysfunction There is more research on sexual dysfunction in males than females. In males, current research points to the need to develop a comprehensive biopsychosocial evaluation and treatment of diabetic patients with sexual dysfunction because of the high incidence of major depression and anxiety disorders noted in impotent men with neuropathy as compared to those who did not have depression, anxiety, or impotence, but had neuropathy. One caveat here is that just learning to cope with a chronic disease may cause psychiatric problems which may lead to lack of compliance, and may snowball into chronic complications, and so the process feeds o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sexual Health In Men: Understanding The Connection

Diabetes And Sexual Health In Men: Understanding The Connection

Diabetes is a leading cause of sexual health issues in people, along with hypertension, high cholesterol, and smoking. It can affect nerve function and blood flow to any place in the body. One area that can often be affected is the genitals. “In men, this can commonly manifest as erectile dysfunction,” says Kenneth Snow, M.D., Joslin’s Acting Chief of Adult Diabetes. Men with poorly controlled diabetes are more likely to have sexual issues than those in good control. Men who have good control of their diabetes can still have issues, according to Dr. Snow, but they are more likely to be mild and responsive to therapy. Diabetes Complications and Sexual Health The biggest cause of sexual issues for men is nerve and artery damage in the genital area, which disrupts blood flow and can cause erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is known to occur in over one-half of men who’ve had diabetes for 10 years. Studies have shown that men with erectile dysfunction and diabetes are also more likely to have heart disease, because the risk factors for erectile dysfunction are the same as for coronary artery disease. “The same problems that lead to decreased blood flow in the arteries in the penis, lead to blockages in the arteries of the heart,” Dr. Snow says. Other sexual health issues can include: Decreased libido – often stemming from depression or low levels of testosterone Premature/delayed ejaculation Maintaining Sexual Health with Diabetes Complications and sexual issues can be avoided by taking proper care of your diabetes. Keep your diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol under control, Dr. Snow says. Along with properly managing your diabetes, other options for treatment can include: Oral medications, including Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra Mechanical method Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sexual Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Sexual Health

With chronic illness, sex often gets put on the back burner. But sexuality and sexual expression are at the top of the list when it comes to quality of life, no matter what problems a person may face. People with type 2 diabetes are no different. It’s important to recognize and address sexuality issues that affect people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can cause sexual complications for both genders, and can also cause gender-specific issues. A common sexuality problem in people with type 2 diabetes is a decrease in libido, or loss of a sex drive. This can be frustrating if someone had a thriving libido and satisfying sex life prior to a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Causes of a low libido associated with type 2 diabetes include: side effects of medications for high blood pressure or depression extreme fatigue lack of energy depression hormonal changes stress, anxiety, and relationship issues Diabetic neuropathy, a type of nerve damage associated with diabetes, can cause issues. Numbness, pain, or lack of feeling can also occur in the genitals. This can lead to erectile dysfunction. It may also inhibit orgasm or make it difficult to feel sexual stimulation. These side effects can make sex painful or unenjoyable. Communication between partners about sexual issues is important. A lack of communication can impact the sexual and intimate side of a relationship. An illness can make it easy for couples to “check out” of the relationship sexually. Sometimes it may seem easier to avoid talking about this issue rather than seeking a solution. If one partner becomes the primary caregiver of the other, it can also change how each person views the other. It’s easy to get caught up in the roles of “patient” and “caregiver” and let the romance can slip away. The most wide Continue reading >>

11 Tips For A Healthy Sex Life If You Have Diabetes

11 Tips For A Healthy Sex Life If You Have Diabetes

iStock/dolgachov Sex can act like insulin, lowering your blood sugar, so it's a good idea to check your levels before things get frisky. If your blood sugar is at the normal level or on the low side, you may need to adjust your insulin or eat something small before or after sex to avoid making yourself hypoglycemic. If you have an insulin pump, consider unhooking it during sex. Here are some good snacks to eat with diabetes. iStock/bhofack2 Alcohol and vigorous sex both lower blood sugar, so combining the two could cause a dangerous drop in blood sugar. If you've had a glass of wine, be extra sure to monitor your blood glucose before slipping between the sheets. Here's what else you need to know about alcohol and blood sugar. Be especially touchy-feely if one of you has nerve damage iStock/AleksandarNakic It's rare, but in some cases nerve damage reduces sensitivity in the genitals in people who have diabetes. You can compensate for this with additional gentle touching in the right places, or try a vibrator. Don't shy away from lube iStock/zoliky Vaginal dryness is common among women who have diabetes. A simple fix is to keep water-based lubricants in the drawer of your nightstand. Avoid oil-based lubes, such as petroleum jelly, because they can damage condoms and lead to bacterial infection. Exercise to increase your libido iStock/michaeljung Here's even more motivation to get your daily dose of exercise: it can boost your sex drive. Exercise improves blood flow, which will improve the function and sensitivity of genitalia. Both men and women with diminished sex dive will benefit from routine exercise, experts say. And check out these other reasons exercise is so darn healthy for diabetes. Report any below-the-belt issues to your doctor iStock/monkeybusinessimages Pay Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Sex

Diabetes & Sex

Having diabetes can have a major impact on your sex life. Prolonged high blood sugar levels increase the chances of developing sexual dysfunction and this is more likely to be the case if you have neuropathy or reduced circulation. All types of diabetes can lead to difficulties with sexual intercourse, although it’s no foregone conclusion and, should problems occur, there are a range of different treatments that can help. How diabetes can affect sex life Reduced sensitivity – if neuropathy causes sensory nerves of the genitals to be damaged Sexual dysfunction – this can affect both men and women Reduced libido – reduced sex drive may be caused by a number of factors Hypoglycemia – can occur during sex if you take certain diabetes medications Urinary tract infections – regularly high blood glucose levels may increase the chance of developing a UTI Sexual dysfunction may be temporary and could be brought on by psychological reasons, a new course of medication, or higher or lower blood glucose levels than normal. If sexual dysfunction does not improve, or gets worse, consult your doctor. He or she should be familiar with discussing sexual difficulties so don’t feel embarrassed about any problems you have or put off making an appointment. How diabetes can affect sex for men Diabetes can result in narrowed blood vessels and damaged nerves in the penis, both of which can lead to difficulty in getting or maintaining an erection (erectile dysfunction). Nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), a common complication of diabetes, may lead to reduced sensitivity of the penis meaning which may make ejaculation more difficult to achieve. Phimosis (tight foreskin) is more common in men with higher than normal blood glucose levels. Phimosis may improve once blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Female Sexuality

Diabetes And Female Sexuality

Sexuality not only implies sexual activity but includes the full spectrum of sexual topics which are dependent upon the medical, psychological and sociocultural aspects of a woman. Sexuality covers not only actual sexual activity, but thoughts about sex, physical attributes, and desire for sexual activity. Related issues include fertility and contraception. What is sexual dysfunction? Sexual dysfunction refers to a problem occurring during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle traditionally includes excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution. Desire and arousal are both part of the excitement phase of the sexual response. Research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common, but many people are hesitant to discuss it. Because treatment options are available, it is important to share your concerns with your partner and health care provider. What are the types of sexual dysfunction? Sexual dysfunction generally is classified into four categories: Desire disorders: Lack of sexual desire or interest in sex Arousal disorders: Inability to become physically aroused or excited during sexual activity Orgasm disorders: Delay or absence of orgasm (climax) Pain disorders: Pain during intercourse What are the symptoms of sexual dysfunction in women? Inability to achieve orgasm Inadequate vaginal lubrication before and during intercourse Inability to relax the vaginal muscles enough to allow intercourse Lack of interest in or desire for sex Inability to become aroused Pain with intercourse How does diabetes affect sexuality? It is fairly well-known that diabetes and complications can affect the sexuality in men, but it is true for women, also. Women are starting Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

Mike’s doctor looked and sounded concerned. “Your sugars are up, your blood pressure is up, and you’ve gained 10 pounds since I last saw you, ” she said. “You were doing so well. What happened? ” “I don’t know,” said Mike. “I’m just down. Exercising and checking my blood glucose don’t seem worth the effort now. My neuropathy is burning holes in my feet. It’s been a hard year.” “Sounds to me like you’re depressed,” said the doctor. She then wrote out a prescription for a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for Mike’s depression and another for a refill of Mike’s usual blood pressure medicine, but this time with a higher dose. The doctor didn’t ask about Mike’s sex life, and Mike didn’t volunteer that what was really bothering him was that he and his wife Barbara had stopped having sex about 10 months before. He couldn’t count on getting erections or keeping them, and without them, he withdrew, both physically and emotionally. He and Barbara were miserable. Unfortunately, both of the medicines his doctor had just prescribed can have the side effects of decreasing sex drive and making it harder for men to have erections. So the new treatments were potentially going to make Mike’s problem worse. Mike hadn’t mentioned his sexual problems to his doctor because he felt embarrassed about them, and his doctor apparently didn’t think to ask about sexual issues. Had she known about Mike’s erection difficulties, she might have prescribed a drug for erectile dysfunction rather than an antidepressant. But Mike had already bought some Viagra on the Internet. It had helped a little with the erections, but not much, and it did nothing for his energy level or low mood. Barbara was at her wit’s end. She thought Mike’s wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sex Drive

Diabetes And Sex Drive

My husband has recently become impotent. We are both 34 years old, and he is diabetic. The problem started about a year ago and has grown increasingly worse - at this time he is unable to maintain an erection at all. To say the least, I am not taking this well and believe it to be psychosomatic; he believes it is medical. I have a hard time believing its a medical problem even though hes diabetic, because he maintains his blood sugar within normal limits. What do you think? Oooh, I sense a lot of tension behind this question, so be gentle with yourselves while you read along. First of all, diabetes (type 1 or 2) is one of the leading causes of impotence in men. Why? Well, think of impotence as being caused by three major categories of things: blood-supply related, nerve-related, or emotional factors. We will talk about the emotional part below, but I want to focus on the medical causes first. Its important to realize that diabetes has profound effects on both the neurological system and the blood (vascular) system. For men with diabetes, their chances of experiencing partial or complete impotence is fairly high at some point in their lives. The fact that your husband is relatively young doesnt mean much in the scheme of things, particularly if he has had diabetes for a number of years. Good control of glycemic levels is critical for staving off some of the blood vessel and/or nerve complications of diabetes, but this information really wasnt available to people with diabetes until about 1994. Before that time, what healthcare providers thought "good blood-sugar control" was, was, in fact, much higher than the optimal levels we try to achieve today. Realistically, this means that despite your husbands (and healthcare providers) best efforts, his blood sugar was probably Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Sex Life?

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Sex Life?

Having diabetes affects much more than a person's diet - it can impact every aspect of their life, including their sexual health. Similarly, it is not just the physical side effects of diabetes that cause problems. Diabetes can have an impact on a person's mental health, their sex drive, and their self-esteem. How does diabetes impact the sexual organs? Diabetes can affect the sexual health of both men and women in the following ways: Impact on women Damage caused by diabetes to the nerves can affect a woman's ability to sense sexual stimulation and arousal. This can affect the release of vaginal lubricant, which may result in painful sex and reduced ability to experience an orgasm. When a woman who has diabetes goes through the menopause, she may experience sudden drops in her blood sugar levels. This may affect a woman's sexual health because she may have to check her blood sugar before having sex. She might also experience symptoms of low blood sugar during sex. This may make sex seem more of an inconvenience than a pleasure. Women with diabetes are also more likely to experience infections, such as thrush, cystitis, and urinary tract infections. These can all impact the ability to have sexual intercourse. Impact on men Men with diabetes often have reduced testosterone levels, which can affect their sex drive. However, the main sexual health problem affecting men who have diabetes is an inability to achieve and, or, maintain an erection. According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, an estimated 50 percent of men who have had diabetes for 10 years experience erectile dysfunction (ED). In order for a man to achieve an erection, significant blood flow to the penis is required. However, diabetes damages the blood vessels, which can affect blood flow to the penis. Diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Better Sex With Diabetes

Better Sex With Diabetes

WebMD Feature Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD Diabetes doesn't have to feel like a third -- and unwanted -- party in bed. You can deal with things like low blood sugar, vaginal dryness, or erection problems by looking at them as hurdles you can overcome, instead of roadblocks that put a stop to sex. Planning ahead can ease some of the challenges. You may associate prep work more with house painting than with having sex, but it can make intimacy more relaxed. Also remember that taking good care of your diabetes is the No. 1 way to prevent or limit sexual issues with diabetes. These tricks and tips can also make sex easier and more fun. 10 Strategies for Better Sex Approach sex like exercise. This helps prevent dreaded blood sugar lows. "Hypoglycemic events during sex are a real buzzkill," says Kerri Morrone Sparling, the author of Balancing Diabetes: Conversations About Finding Happiness and Living Well, who blogs about her life with type 1 diabetes. "Your body just shuts down during a low, so it crushes the enjoyment." If you use insulin, check your blood sugar before sex and have a snack if it's low. For more fun, incorporate snacks into foreplay. Try strawberries or a little ice cream or chocolate. Just go with it. Planning can be helpful, but don't sweat it if sex just happens. "There's no reason not to grab the opportunity if it pops up just because you haven't followed your diabetes exercise routine," says Scott K. Johnson, a diabetes advocate who blogs about his life with type 1 diabetes. Just check your glucose level after. Use a lubricant. If you are a woman with vaginal dryness, a vaginal lubricant can make sex feel better. Ask your doctor about using one regularly, not just during sex. "Think of it like hand cream," says Janis Roszler, a diabetes educator in Continue reading >>

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