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Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

Periodontitis Exposure Within One Year Before Anti-diabetic Treatment And The Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis In Diabetes

Periodontitis Exposure Within One Year Before Anti-diabetic Treatment And The Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis In Diabetes

Abstract To examine whether a history of periodontitis (PD) before anti-diabetic treatment is associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development in newly-treated diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the 1997-2009 National Health Insurance (NHI) claims data of one million representative individuals from all NHI enrollees. Adults with DM (aged ≥20 years) starting anti-diabetic treatment during 2001–2009 were classified as newly-treated DM patients. We identified 7097 DM subjects with PD history within one year before initiating anti-diabetes treatment (index date). By matching these 7097 subjects for age on the index date, sex, and year of the index date, we randomly extracted 14,194 DM subjects without PD history within one year before anti- diabetic treatment. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by applying Cox proportional hazards models to quantify the association be- tween PD history and RA risk. Compared with DM patients without PD exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment, crude HR and adjusted HR of RA among DM patients with PD exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment were 4.51 (95% CI, 1.39–14.64) and 3.77 (95% CI, 1.48–9.60). PD exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment was associated with increased RA risk in newly treated DM patients. The lack of knowledge about individual smoking status is a major limitation of this study. Resumo Examinar se uma história de periodontite (PD) antes do tratamento antidiabético está associada a risco de ocorrência de artrite reumatoide (AR) em pacientes com diabetes melittus (DM) tratados de novo. Fizemos um estudo retrospectivo populacional com os dados de r Continue reading >>

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (jia, Arthritis In Childhood, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Jra, Juvenile Chronic Arthritis)

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (jia, Arthritis In Childhood, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Jra, Juvenile Chronic Arthritis)

ENBREL is a medicine that affects your immune system. ENBREL can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections have happened in patients taking ENBREL. These infections include tuberculosis (TB) and infections caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria that have spread throughout the body. Some patients have died from these infections. Your healthcare provider should test you for TB before you take ENBREL and monitor you closely for TB before, during, and after ENBREL treatment, even if you have tested negative for TB. There have been some cases of unusual cancers reported in children and teenage patients who started using tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers before 18 years of age. Also, for children, teenagers, and adults taking TNF blockers, including ENBREL, the chances of getting lymphoma or other cancers may increase. Patients with RA may be more likely to get lymphoma. Before starting ENBREL, tell your healthcare provider if you: Have any existing medical conditions Think you have, are being treated for, have signs of, or are prone to infection. You should not start taking ENBREL if you have any kind of infection, unless your healthcare provider says it is okay Were born in, lived in, or traveled to countries where there is more risk for getting TB. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure Live, have lived in, or traveled to certain parts of the country (such as, the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys, or the Southwest) where there is a greater risk for certain kinds of fungal infections, such as histoplasmosis. These infections may develop or become more severe if you take ENBREL. If you don’t know if these infections are common in the areas you’ve been to, ask your healthcare provider Are taking anti-diabetic medicines H Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs And Statins In Rheumatoid Arthritis

Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs And Statins In Rheumatoid Arthritis

Objective To investigate the rate of incident diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the impact of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and statin treatments. Methods We studied patients with RA and ≥1 year participation in the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases without baseline DM from 2000 through 2014. DM was determined by self-report or initiating DM medication. DMARDs were categorised into four mutually exclusive groups: (1) methotrexate monotherapy (reference); (2) any abatacept with or without synthetic DMARDs (3) any other DMARDs with methotrexate; (4) all other DMARDs without methotrexate; along with separate statin, glucocorticoid and hydroxychloroquine (yes/no) variables. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard models were used to adjust for age, sex, socioeconomic status, comorbidities, body mass index and RA severity measures. Results During a median (IQR) 4.6 (2.5–8.8) years of follow-up in 13 669 patients with RA, 1139 incident DM cases were observed. The standardised incidence ratio (95% CI) of DM in patients with RA (1.37, (1.29 to 1.45)) was increased compared with US adult population. Adjusted HR (95% CI) for DM were 0.67 (0.57 to 0.80) for hydroxychloroquine, 0.52 (0.31 to 0.89) for abatacept (compared with methotrexate monotherapy), 1.31 (1.15 to 1.49) for glucocorticoids and 1.56 (1.36 to 1.78) for statins. Other synthetic/biological DMARDs were not associated with any risk change. Concomitant use of glucocorticoids did not alter DM risk reduction with hydroxychloroquine (HR 0.69 (0.51 to 0.93)). Conclusions In RA, incidence of DM is increased. Hydroxychloroquine and abatacept were associated with decreased risk of DM, and glucocorticoids and statins with increased risk. Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

Hydroxychloroquine And Risk Of Diabetes In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

Hydroxychloroquine And Risk Of Diabetes In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

Context Hydroxychloroquine, a commonly used antirheumatic medication, has hypoglycemic effects and may reduce the risk of diabetes mellitus. Objective To determine the association between hydroxychloroquine use and the incidence of self-reported diabetes in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Design, Setting, and Patients A prospective, multicenter observational study of 4905 adults with rheumatoid arthritis (1808 had taken hydroxychloroquine and 3097 had never taken hydroxychloroquine) and no diagnosis or treatment for diabetes in outpatient university-based and community-based rheumatology practices with 21.5 years of follow-up (January 1983 through July 2004). Main Outcome Measures Diabetes by self-report of diagnosis or hypoglycemic medication use. Results During the observation period, incident diabetes was reported by 54 patients who had taken hydroxychloroquine and by 171 patients who had never taken hydroxychloroquine, with incidence rates of 5.2 per 1000 patient-years of observation compared with 8.9 per 1000 patient-years of observation, respectively (P < .001). In time-varying multivariable analysis with adjustments for possible confounding factors, the hazard ratio for incident diabetes among patients who had taken hydroxychloroquine was 0.62 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.92) compared with those who had not taken hydroxychloroquine. In Poisson regression, the risk of incident diabetes was significantly reduced with increased duration of hydroxychloroquine use (P < .001 for trend); among those taking hydroxychloroquine for more than 4 years (n = 384), the adjusted relative risk of developing diabetes was 0.23 (95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.50; P < .001), compared with those who had not taken hydroxychloroquine. Conclusion Among patients with Continue reading >>

Ask The Doctor: Type 2 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Ask The Doctor: Type 2 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Hello, my mother suffers from Type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. I know she takes medication prescribed by her physician, but I was hoping you could offer other ideas for her healing, as well as for managing the aches and pain of her RA. Thanks so much for your time and any suggestions! Dr. Whimsy: Hello, and thank you for your question. Type 2 diabetes is quickly becoming one of the most serious health epidemics in the United States. Currently, the American Diabetes Association estimates that over 25 million Americans suffer from the disease, with an additional 79 million pre-diabetic individuals suffering as well. People who suffer from diabetes are at greater risk for heart disease and many other serious health risks. While type 1 diabetes is considered irreversible, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some individuals with proper diet, exercise, and supplementation. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder characterized by pain and inflammation, especially in the joints of the hands, wrist, feet, ankles, and sometimes knees, and the presence of the antibody known as “rheumatoid factor.” For both conditions, weight loss seems to be extremely beneficial — improving energy while decreasing painful symptoms. One of the most common ways a naturopath might treat both conditions is by considering a diet known as “anti-inflammatory.” Both rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes seem to improve on a mostly whole foods plant-based diet that is rich in omega 3-fatty-acids and with the elimination of foods thought to be inflammatory like non-organic eggs, sugar and processed foods, dairy, wheat, and nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes, bell peppers). Currently, Erewhon is able to offer additional support to its customers by carrying Metage Continue reading >>

Unstable Diabetes In A Patient Receiving Anti-tnf-α For Rheumatoid Arthritis

Unstable Diabetes In A Patient Receiving Anti-tnf-α For Rheumatoid Arthritis

S ir , Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cytokine well-recognized as having a significant role in the inflammatory process. Recent advances have led to the production of drugs that inhibit the action of TNF-α, producing significant improvement in the control of rheumatic diseases [ 1 ]. TNF-α may also play a role in other physiological processes. Prolonged administration of anti-TNF-α drugs is increasingly common in the treatment of rheumatic disease and also inflammatory bowel disease. Here we report on a case of an individual whose diabetes became unstable following the administration of anti-TNF drugs. Our case is a 55-yr-old female who has had type 1 diabetes since the age of 30. Aged 33, she developed rheumatoid arthritis. Having failed a number of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), she was commenced on etanercept (25 mg twice weekly) in April 2003 (DAS = 7.06). This led to significant improvement in her joints immediately. Having previously had stable diabetes, within 3 weeks of commencing the drug, she noticed that her blood sugars were erratic. She had a severe hypoglycaemic attack without warning, followed further by one more a few days later. After urgent clinical review, the etanercept was stopped and her glycaemic control stabilized. Despite commencing subcutaneous methotrexate, her joints remained markedly active, which ultimately led to her admission in October 2004. Her Disease Activity Score (DAS) score was 6.8, and after much consideration the patient was commenced on adalimumab. Within 12 h of administration, she developed severe hypoglycaemia, which recurred again 24 h later. The adalimumab was subsequently stopped. The patient has continued with severe active joint disease. She has had severe side effects with a number of DMARD Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Ogtt Study

Prevalence Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Ogtt Study

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by an excess of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, estimated to be at least 50% greater when compared to the general population. Although the widespread diffusion of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) awareness, there is still a significant proportion of patients with T2DM that remain undiagnosed. Aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in RA patients. For the present study, 100 consecutive nondiabetic RA patients were recruited. Age- and sex-matched subjects with noninflammatory diseases (osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia) were used as controls. After overnight fasting, blood samples were obtained for laboratory evaluation including serum glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies (ACPA). A standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose was performed and blood samples were collected at time 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, for measurement of plasma glucose concentrations. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (9/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.49), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (19/100 vs 12/100, P = 0.17), and concomitant IFG/IGT (5/100 vs 9/100, P = 0.27) was similar between groups, whereas the prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in RA patients (10/100 vs 2/100, P = 0.02). In a logistic regression analysis, increasing age (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.028–1.245, P = 0.01) and disease duration (OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.210–2.995, P = 0.005) were both associated with Continue reading >>

Arthritis & Diabetes

Arthritis & Diabetes

What do diabetes and arthritis have in common? Plenty. People with diagnosed diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, indicating a diabetes-arthritis connection. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce or use the hormone insulin sufficiently. Insulin shuttles glucose from foods into cells so it can be converted into energy. Without insulin, glucose remains in your blood (raising blood glucose levels), your cells create less energy and you feel fatigued. What starts off as a hormonal problem can evolve into joint problems, in addition to the widely known cardiovascular problems. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness; swelling; nodules under the skin, particularly in the fingers; tight, thickened skin; trigger finger; carpal tunnel syndrome; painful shoulders; and severely affected feet. After having had diabetes for several years, joint damage – called diabetic arthropathy – can occur. Continue reading >>

Decrease Of Fructosamine Levels During Treatment With Adalimumab In Patients With Both Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Decrease Of Fructosamine Levels During Treatment With Adalimumab In Patients With Both Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Abstract Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which has been closely linked to obesity and insulin resistance. We present two cases of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and concomitant diabetes mellitus, who showed a marked decrease of fructosamine levels after initiating therapy with adalimumab, a TNFα-blocking agent, for active RA. This finding may implicate that TNFα blockade causes better glycaemic control in RA patients with concomitant diabetes, possibly by improving insulin resistance. Introduction Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNFα has also been closely linked to obesity and insulin resistance (1). Increased insulin resistance, just as RA (2), is an important risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) (3). Thus far, the role of TNFα in insulin resistance has remained controversial. Despite a clear reversal of insulin resistance by TNFα neutralization in animal models (4, 5), two studies in humans did not show an effect of administration of either a chimeric anti-TNFα antibody (6) or a recombinant soluble TNFα receptor (7) on insulin sensitivity in obese or type 2 diabetes patients. However, recently it was shown that TNFα infusion impairs glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle by altering insulin signal transduction (8) and induces insulin resistance in healthy volunteers (9). Moreover, TNFα antagonists, in addition to their known powerful anti-inflammatory effects, may have a beneficial effect on insulin resistance in rheumatic diseases (10–12). Beneficial clinical effects of treatment of RA with TNFα antagonists on concomitant diabetes have not been described. We describe h Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes are very different diseases. But there's a connection between them. Having one may mean you're more likely to develop the other. In fact, research shows that RA raises your risk for diabetes by about 50%. And diabetes raises your risk of having arthritis, including RA and arthritis-related issues, by about 20%. Nearly half of American adults who have diabetes also have arthritis. Experts aren't sure why these two diseases are linked. They believe that a variety of things play a role, including: RA and type 1 diabetes are both autoimmune diseases. The immune system's job is to destroy germs and other sickness-causing invaders. Sometimes, the system goes haywire and turns against the body's own healthy cells. RA attacks the joints. Type 1 diabetes targets the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that helps your body process blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in children and young adults and makes up less than 5% of all diabetes cases. Research suggests that some people tend to have more than one autoimmune disease. This may be partly due to genetics. And scientists have identified a gene that raises the risk for both type 1 diabetes and RA. RA causes chronic inflammation. In the short run, inflammation helps the body heal. But when it's ongoing, it causes the body to stop responding to insulin the way it should. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the condition raises the risk for type 2 diabetes. This occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin or resists its effects. Diabetes also triggers inflammation. On the flipside, chronic inflammation from diabetes may pave the way for RA. RA is caused by genetics and environmental factors. Research suggests that inflammation may cause people w Continue reading >>

Molly’s Story: Struggles With Ra & Type 1 Diabetes

Molly’s Story: Struggles With Ra & Type 1 Diabetes

Molly Schreiber- raised in Fairfax, Virginia but has been in Baltimore, Maryland since 1997. She was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 9, in the summer of 1988. Molly’s father, grand-father, and cousin all have diabetes as well, so she grew up knowing what a challenging and frustrating disease diabetes can be. For years she managed the disease with test strips and multiple daily injections. In 2000 she got her first insulin pump and hasn’t looked back since. She is currently rocking a purple pancreas which is both an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor. In case Type 1 Diabetes wasn’t a fun enough addition to her life, Molly’s immune system decided to throw in Rheumatoid Arthritis in the fall of 2011. This was a game changer for her and still is. You can find Molly on Twitter: @mollyschreiber, Facebook: Facebook.com/atjax, Instagram: @mollyschreiber and on her blog: www.atjax.net Daily Struggles with Rheumatoid Arthritis & Type 1 Diabetes When most people hear “Rheumatoid Arthritis” they think of someone much older than my 36 year old self. They believe the disease is from doing too much. The true definition of Rheumatoid Arthritis couldn’t be further from the truth. Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic, progressive, autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in my joints and can eventually result in immobility and/or deformity. At the time of my diagnosis, 4 years ago, I couldn’t walk down the stairs in my home because my foot joints were so stiff. I couldn’t wash my face with my left hand because my elbow was locked in a straightened position. I also couldn’t even stay awake for a haircut because of the intense fatigue. I’d like to say that, 4 years later, I’m doing remarkably well, but that would be a lie. In my four short year Continue reading >>

Poor Clinical Response In Rheumatoid Arthritis Is The Main Risk Factor For Diabetes Development In The Short-term: A 1-year, Single-centre, Longitudinal Study

Poor Clinical Response In Rheumatoid Arthritis Is The Main Risk Factor For Diabetes Development In The Short-term: A 1-year, Single-centre, Longitudinal Study

Abstract Despite of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) provided different sets of recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk in inflammatory arthritis patients, it must be pointed out that cardiometabolic comorbidity, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), remains still underdiagnosed and undertreated in patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this work, we designed a single centre, prospective study in order to better investigate the occurrence of T2D during the course of 1 year of follow-up. Furthermore, we evaluated the role of both traditional cardiovascular and RA-specific related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new T2D. Results In this study, we evaluated 439 consecutive RA patients and we observed that 7.1% of our patients (31/439) developed T2D, after 12 month of prospective follow-up. The regression analysis showed that the presence of high blood pressure, the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) at the first observation and the poor EULAR-DAS28 response, after 12 months of follow–up, were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as T2D. Similarly, we observed that 7.7% of our patients (34/439) showed IFG after 12 months of prospective follow-up. The regression analysis showed that the presence of high blood pressure and the poor EULAR-DAS28 response after 12 months of follow-up, were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of showing IFG. Our study supports the hypothesis of a significant short-term risk of T2D in RA patients and of a close associations between uncontrolled disease activity and glucose metabolism derangement. Further multicentre, randomised-controlled studies are surely needed in order to elucidate these findings and to better ascertain the possible contribution Continue reading >>

Monitoring Diabetes In Patients With And Without Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Medicare Study

Monitoring Diabetes In Patients With And Without Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Medicare Study

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is a key predictor of mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Both RA and diabetes increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet understanding of how comorbid RA impacts the receipt of guideline-based diabetes care is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine how the presence of RA affected hemoglobin A1C (A1c) and lipid measurement in older adults with diabetes. Using a retrospective cohort approach, we identified beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes from a 5% random national sample of 2004 to 2005 Medicare patients (N = 256,331), then examined whether these patients had comorbid RA and whether they received guideline recommended A1c and lipid testing in 2006. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the effect of RA on receiving guideline recommended testing, adjusting for baseline sociodemographics, comorbidities and health care utilization. Two percent of diabetes patients had comorbid RA (N = 5,572). Diabetes patients with comorbid RA were more likely than those without RA to have baseline cardiovascular disease (such as 17% more congestive heart failure), diabetes-related complications including kidney disease (19% higher), lower extremity ulcers (77% higher) and peripheral vascular disease (32% higher). In adjusted models, diabetes patients with RA were less likely to receive recommended A1c testing (odds ratio (OR) 0.84, CI 0.80 to 0.89) than those without RA, but were slightly more likely to receive lipid testing (OR 1.08, CI 1.01 to 1.16). In older adults with diabetes, the presence of comorbid RA predicted lower rates of A1c testing but slightly improved lipid testing. Future research should examine strategies to improve A1c testing in patients with diabetes and RA, in light of increased Continue reading >>

Tampa Florida Rheumatoid Arthritis Diabetes Copd Lupus Treatment Trials Launched

Tampa Florida Rheumatoid Arthritis Diabetes Copd Lupus Treatment Trials Launched

Clinical Research of West Florida is enrolling participants for new research studies. Residents suffering from COPD, lupus, diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis can apply for medical care. CRWF offers qualified patients in Tampa, St Petersburg, and Clearwater world-class medical care, with no fees or insurance needed. All night, it\'s been a headache for drivers – from skidding,… Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Clearwater, United States – October 19, 2017 /NewsNetwork/ — A Tampa, Florida based clinical research center has launched a search for people suffering from COPD, lupus, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical Research of West Florida can offer qualified patients in Tampa, St Petersburg and Clearwater cutting-edge medical care, with no fees or medical insurance needed. More information can be found at: Clinical Research of West Florida (CRWF) has four trials ongoing today, investigating and evaluating new medications, procedures and/or devices for COPD, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. CRWF is looking for study participants that have been diagnosed with any of these diseases for its cutting-edge research. CRWF is the future of medicine in Tampa Bay, and has been providin Continue reading >>

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