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Diabetes And Restlessness

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Troubles

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Troubles

Sleep is important for everyone, but it’s especially important when your body experiences changing blood sugar levels and other symptoms of type 2 diabetes. “Sleep deprivation causes changes in the effectiveness of the body's control of appetite, which can lead to weight gain, higher blood sugar, and increased resistance to insulin,” says Richard Castriotta, MD, director of the division of pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Although sleep is very important when you have type 2 diabetes, you may find you can’t sleep when you need it most. One explanation for the problem seems to be the connection between diabetes and sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a condition that’s characterized by periods of halted breathing while you’re asleep, which wakes you up repeatedly throughout the night, leaving you fatigued and not well rested in the morning. Both type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea are health concerns that are linked to obesity, so experts have long recognized a connection between the two. However, only recently has it been realized how closely these conditions are tied to one another. “There’s much more interrelation between the two conditions than we thought,” says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, a physician in the Cleveland Clinic’s department of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism. “In fact, one may actually contribute to causing the other, and vice versa. Recent studies have shown that sleep apnea actually increases insulin resistance, hunger, and other type 2 diabetes symptoms,” Dr. Hatipoglu says. “Other studies have shown that treating sleep apnea also improves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.” Other Sleep Issues You Might Face Another problem that disrupts sleep is frequent urinatio Continue reading >>

Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless Leg Syndrome

Tweet Restless leg syndrome is a common condition that affects the nervous system, resulting in uncomfortable sensations that cause an overwhelming urge to move the legs or arms. These creeping or crawling sensations can result in symptoms that vary from mild to unbearable. They are often worse in the evening, or when at rest, and can cause disturbances to sleeping patterns. Periodic limb movements are associated with restless leg syndrome in which a person will involuntarily have a jerking of their legs, arms or other parts of the body. Diabetes can be a cause of restless leg syndrome, as can a number of other chronic diseases. Relationship with diabetes Uncontrolled high blood sugars in people with diabetes can cause nerve damage, and may lead to diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Damage to the nerves of the feet and lower leg from peripheral neuropathy is a contributor to restless leg syndrome. Previous studies have shown that restless leg syndrome is common in patients with type 2 diabetes, who can also suffer poor quality sleep believed to be associated with impaired glucose metabolism. Causes of restless leg syndrome There are two categories of restless leg syndrome; primary and secondary. Primary restless leg syndrome has no known cause, although doctors suspect that genes can play a role, and often begins before the age of 40. Secondary restless leg usually affects people over 40, and is associated with a number of reasons that can worsen symptoms, including: Chronic health conditions – such as diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, iron deficiency, Parkinson’s disease, kidney failure and an underactive thyroid gland Pregnancy – restless leg syndrome can be experienced in the final trimester, particularly from week 27. In most cases, symptoms usually go away within Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep: What’s The Connection?

Diabetes And Sleep: What’s The Connection?

Diabetes and sleep related issues go hand in hand. For many diabetics, tossing and turning all night, only to wake up the next morning feeling exhausted and sluggish is an all too common occurrence. Unfortunately, poor sleep is another reason your blood sugar levels are not yet under control. Sleep disturbance is often observed in patients diagnosed with Diabetes Type 2. Doctors believe it may be caused either by impaired glucose metabolism or the physical and psychological discomfort associated with diabetes. In fact, research shows that poor sleep also contributes towards decreased glucose tolerance and poorer insulin sensitivity. Decode the Link between Diabetes And Sleep The connection between sleep and diabetes is a bit of a vicious cycle. Sleep difficulties are a common result of uncontrolled diabetes as you may need to get up to urinate more often . Whenever your blood sugar rises, the kidneys try to remove the extra sugar by increasing urination, which means, you are getting up to use the bathroom all night and don’t sleep well. Also, diabetics are more susceptible to sleep-related ailments like sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome, further deteriorating sleep quality. At the same time, poor sleep quality has a detrimental effect on blood glucose levels, and that is the reason that it is associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes in research studies. Exhaustion and poor energy levels often result in an increased desire to snack on sugary foods late into the night. The body needs energy from somewhere, and so, it turns to quick snacks. But these snacks result in high blood sugar levels, that only interfere with quality sleep. So how can you break this vicious cycle of poor sleep increasing diabetes and diabetes worsening sleep quality? Th Continue reading >>

Restless Legs Syndrome

Restless Legs Syndrome

A sleep disorder characterized by unpleasant creeping, crawling, tingling, or painful sensations in the legs during rest. It is believed to affect as many as 12 million Americans, and many more may be affected since the condition is underdiagnosed. No one knows exactly what causes restless legs syndrome (RLS), but it is thought to involve abnormalities in the brain chemical dopamine’s action in the central nervous system. It is known to run in families and to occur fairly frequently in women during pregnancy. It has also been associated with anemia or low iron levels, spinal cord and peripheral nerve lesions, kidney failure, diabetes, and peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage in the feet, legs, hands, and arms). The unpleasant sensations of RLS most often occur in one or both of the lower legs but may occur in the thighs, feet, or even arms and hands. The symptoms may occur at night or during any period of relaxation or inactivity. People with RLS often have an urge to move their legs whenever they experience these symptoms, which can be disruptive to bed partners. RLS sufferers are often sleepy and have trouble concentrating during the day because of not getting enough sleep at night. Some people with RLS also have another sleep disorder called periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS), characterized by involuntary jerking or bending of the knees, ankles, or hips during sleep. Like RLS, PLMS can rob people of sleep and make them drowsy during the day. There is no specific diagnostic test for RLS, so doctors must rely on the person’s description of symptoms and medical history to make the diagnosis. The doctor may ask about the use of certain antinausea, antiseizure, antipsychotic, antidepressant, or cold and allergy drugs that may trigger or aggravate RLS; he may also Continue reading >>

Restless Sleep, Restless Blood Sugar

Restless Sleep, Restless Blood Sugar

Kristen Knutson, PhD, recently added to the growing body of research from the University of Chicago on the long-term consequences of skimping on sleep. She found that diabetics who sleep poorly have a harder time controlling their insulin and glucose levels than diabetics who sleep well. The research was published in the journal Diabetes Care. We conducted an extended interview with Kristen Knutson about her research, and below are some of the highlights. Q: Why study diabetes and chronic sleep problems? A: Many of our laboratory studies, led by Dr. Eve Van Cauter, have shown that restriction of sleep is associated with alterations in glucose metabolism. Usually, these lab studies are a week. But we wonder about the long-term effects of being a chronic short sleeper. We think that chronic poor sleep could put people at risk of many health problems, including diabetes. Q: How did you design your study? A: We used data from an epidemiologic study called CARDIA (coronary artery risk development in young adults). It started in 1985, and has been going on for more than 20 years. We gave the participants wrist activity monitors—it’s like a wristwatch that measures the subject’s sleep duration. The participants wore the activity monitors for three nights in a row. A year later, they wore the monitors three more nights. So we had a total of six days of data. We also asked them about their sleep. Did they wake up frequently during the night, three or more times per week? Did they have trouble falling asleep? To get the measurements of their fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin, we used the data from the CARDIA study, in which the participants gave fasting blood samples. Their fasting blood glucose and insulin give us an estimate of insulin resistance. Q: Explain Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep

People who have diabetes often have poor sleep habits, including difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. Some people with diabetes get too much sleep, while others have problems getting enough sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American adults do not get enough sleep needed for good health, safety, and optimum performance. There are several causes of sleep problems for people with type 2 diabetes, including obstructive sleep apnea, pain or discomfort, restless legs syndrome, the need to go to the bathroom, and other problems associated with type 2 diabetes. Sleep apnea involves pauses in breathing during sleep. The periods of stopped breathing are called apneas, which are caused by an obstruction of the upper airway. Apneas may be interrupted by a brief arousal that does not awaken you completely -- you often do not even realize that your sleep was disturbed. Yet if your sleep was measured in a sleep laboratory, technicians would record changes in the brain waves that are characteristic of awakening. Sleep apnea results in low oxygen levels in the blood because the blockages prevent air from getting to the lungs. The low oxygen levels also affect brain and heart function. Up to two-thirds of the people who have sleep apnea are overweight. Sleep apnea alters our sleep cycle and stages of sleep. Some studies have linked altered sleep stages with a decrease in growth hormone, which plays a key role in body composition such as body fat, muscle, and abdominal fat. Researchers have found a possible link between sleep apnea and the development of diabetes and insulin resistance (the inability of the body to use insulin). Peripheral neuropathy, or damage to the nerves in the feet and legs, is another cause of sleep disruption. This nerve damage can c Continue reading >>

The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes

A list of 12 common symptoms and how the condition is diagnosed The symptoms of Type 1 diabetes can easily be mistaken for other illnesses, including the flu. Unfortunately, a missed diagnosis can be fatal, so it’s important to seek medical help if Type 1 diabetes is suspected. It’s much better to test for Type 1 diabetes and receive a negative diagnosis than not test and miss a diagnosis. Here are the most common symptoms of the onset of Type 1 diabetes: Frequent Urination Excessive thirst Excessive hunger Feeling tired all or much of the time Nausea Loss of muscle mass and unexplained weight loss Blurring of vision Other symptoms can include: Unexpected cramping Fast heart rate Skin infections Excessive sweating Restlessness or insomnia Anyone experiencing any of the above symptoms of Type 1 diabetes should see a medical professional as soon as possible and be administered a blood test to detect blood glucose levels. Untreated Type 1 diabetes can lead to a potentially life-threatening condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as lifelong complications, so it is important to get a proper diagnosis as soon as possible. Medical professionals can sometimes overlook the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes or mistake those symptoms for another condition. It is the patient’s right to ask for a blood sugar test even if a medical professional and patient are in disagreement. Once Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, blood sugar levels can be regulated through insulin therapy (as well as possibly other drug therapies). If a person with Type 1 diabetes is in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis, it might also be necessary to treat that condition in a hospital setting at time of diagnosis. Craig Idlebrook contributed to this article. Do you have an idea you would like to write about Continue reading >>

Restlessness? Part Of Diabetes?

Restlessness? Part Of Diabetes?

Just wondering if restlessness is part of diabetes? Or do you think it is just part of depression? I seem to be very restless now that my sugar is under control, feeling better, walking daily, and losing weight now. Now that I am losing weight, I also wake up a lot during the night (for what seems no reason at all). I have also thought maybe it has been so many years since I have felt better, that I do not know quite how to act to actually feeling well some days! Hi. I don't think that restlessness is part of diabetes at all. I think you might just need a hobby. Good luck. Perhaps you have more energy now because you've lost weight and gotten your diabetes under control. My husband has restless leg syndrome. He was told this by his neurologist. He used to have trouble sleeping before he was ever diagnoised with diabeties. It's just worse now due to the pain in his legs. I heard of another diabetic who also had trouble sleeping. I think it involves the changes in your system. Continue reading >>

Association Of Restless Legs Syndrome In Type 2 Diabetes: A Case-control Study

Association Of Restless Legs Syndrome In Type 2 Diabetes: A Case-control Study

Go to: Abstract To look for an association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and type 2 diabetes in a case-control study; to analyze the characteristics of RLS in diabetic patients; and to identify possible risk factors for the development of RLS in diabetic patients. One hundred twenty-four consecutive outpatients with diabetes and 87 consecutive controls with a previous diagnosis of other endocrine disease. Interventions: RLS was diagnosed using the criteria of the International RLS Study Group, and severity of RLS was assessed using the International RLS Study Group Rating Scale. Characteristics of RLS and several laboratory parameters were investigated in diabetic patients and controls affected by the sleep disorder. A clinical diagnosis of polyneuropathy was assessed to evaluate its role as a risk factor for RLS in diabetic patients. RLS was diagnosed in 22 diabetic patients (17.7%) and in only 5 controls (5.5%), 3 of whom had pituitary and 2 had adrenal gland disorders, and RLS was independently associated with type 2 diabetes (P < 0.04). Even if a clinical diagnosis of polyneuropathy was made in only 27% of diabetic patients affected by RLS, after multivariate logistic regression, the presence of polyneuropathy was the only variable associated with RLS in diabetics (odds ratio, 7.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.34–46.28; P < 0.02). RLS in diabetics showed a frequency of positive family history lower than that known for primary RLS, showed a late age of onset, and manifested itself after the diagnosis of diabetes was made. This is the first controlled study confirming a significant association between RLS and type 2 diabetes. In diabetic patients, polyneuropathy represents the main risk factor for RLS. However, polyneuropathy only partially explains the increa Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Restlessness

Diabetes-related Causes Of Restlessness

Our information shows that 3causes of Restlessness are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 380total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Restlessness if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Restlessness as a side effect. Drug interactions may be a possible cause of Restlessness . [See detailed list of 1145drug interaction causes of Restlessness ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Restlessness: The following list of conditionshave ' Restlessness ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Restlessness or choose View All. View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X # Conditions listing medical complications: Restlessness: The following list of medical conditions have ' Restlessness ' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database. By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use . Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep Problems

Diabetes And Sleep Problems

Sleep difficulties are more common in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t. That’s because having diabetes raises the risk for certain sleep problems such as sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Learn more about how diabetes affects sleep, the common types of sleep problems and most importantly, how they can be treated so that you can finally get a good night’s sleep. Frequently Asked Questions Even though I get enough sleep, I feel tired a lot and have nodded off at work. Why might this be? I have pain in my feet that keeps me awake at night. What could be causing this? Sometimes at night my legs feel “twitchy” and I have to keep moving them. Could this be restless legs syndrome? Once in a while I wake up during the night feeling shaky and sweaty. Is this due to my diabetes? I have to get up several times during the night to use the bathroom. What is causing this? How much sleep do I need every night? What is the downside if I don’t get enough sleep? I have trouble falling asleep at night, but I don’t want to take a sleeping pill. What else can I do? I recently gained quite a bit of weight and now I’m waking up a lot during the night. What could this be? Diabetes and Sleep Problems This booklet was developed by Joslin Diabetes Center and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and supported by funding from the ResMed Foundation. Learn more about the common causes of sleep problems among people with diabetes as well as common treatment options. Download the Joslin Diabetes Center booklet Diabetes & Sleep Problems below. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

Restless Legs Syndrome And Quality Of Sleep In Type 2 Diabetes

Restless Legs Syndrome And Quality Of Sleep In Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE—To investigate the presence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and the quality of sleep in a population of type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The study population was composed of 100 consecutive patients regularly attending a diabetes clinic at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Ceará. The subjects’ quality of sleep was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The RLS was diagnosed using the four minimum criteria defined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Other relevant clinical and laboratory parameters were obtained by interview and chart review. RESULTS—RLS was found in 27% of patients. Poor sleep quality was present in 45% of cases and was associated with age (P = 0.04), peripheral neuropathy (P = 0.001), and RLS (P = 0.000). EDS was found in 26% of patients. Logistic regression analysis revealed an association between RLS and peripheral neuropathy (odds ratio 12.85 [95% CI 2.83–58.40], P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS—RLS is common in type 2 diabetic patients and can be a major cause of sleep disruption in these patients. Diabetes is a lifelong disease of increasing incidence in the Western world and is frequently comorbid with other disorders such as retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy (1,2). Most patients develop diabetes after age 40 years, and, although much progress has been made in therapy, the majority of diabetic patients continue to die from macrovascular complications (i.e., cardiovascular disease) (3). Recently it has become clear that sleep disturbances (e.g., chronic insomnia, sleep apnea) have a major impact on health and quality of life; this adverse impact can usual Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Restless Leg Syndrome

Diabetes And Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder characterized by the urge to move your legs. It is often accompanied by disturbing and uncomfortable leg sensations during nighttime and periods of inactivity. RLS can make it hard to fall or stay asleep, and can lead to extreme tiredness during the day. The condition affects 5 to 15 percent of Americans. But a higher percentage of people with diabetes may have RLS, which can be worsened by peripheral neuropathy or nerve damage caused by uncontrolled blood sugars. In one controlled study, researchers found that out of 140 patients with diabetes, 28.6 percent had RLS, compared with only 7.1 percent in the control group.1 What Causes RLS? Research suggests that the main cause of RLS is a faulty use of iron in the brain. The brain uses iron to make the chemical dopamine, which works in the part of the brain that controls movement and other brain activities. Many conditions can affect how much iron is in the brain or how it is used. These include diabetes, kidney failure, Parkinson’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pregnancy, and iron deficiency. There is also a genetic component to the disease; people whose family members have RLS are more likely to develop the disorder. Nerve damage in the legs or feet or sometimes in the arms or hands caused by diabetes can be associated with RLS. Diagnosing RLS So far there are no medical tests to diagnose RLS, but doctors may run blood tests or other exams to rule out other conditions. Diagnosis is based on a patient’s symptoms, medication use, the presence of other symptoms or medical conditions, and/or problems with daytime exhaustion. Patients may be asked to keep a diary of their symptoms to aid in diagnosis. Signs & Symptoms For a diagnosis of RLS, four symptoms must be pr Continue reading >>

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