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Diabetes And Probiotics

Probiotics And Diabetes: Can Probiotics Help?

Probiotics And Diabetes: Can Probiotics Help?

The word “bacteria” is enough to make most people cringe. And the knowledge that there are about 39 trillion bacteria in the human body can seem horrifying (there are more bacteria in the body than there are cells!). Yes, there are the bad, harmful bacteria that can cause disease and illness. But there are also the helpful, good bacteria that research increasingly indicates play a role in health promotion and disease prevention. Microbiome 101 We all have bacteria in our digestive tract. While it’s unpleasant to think about, the reality is that they’re there to stay. The collection of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites (called microorganisms) in our gut is called the microbiome. Some are potentially harmful, but many of them are the good guys with the potential to help fight off illness and chronic disease. Everyone’s microbiome is unique; in other words, no two people have the same microbiome. That’s because the microbiota is determined, initially, by your DNA. When you’re born, you’re exposed to your mother’s microorganisms during delivery, and, if you’re breastfed, through your mother’s breast milk. Over time, the environment and your diet influence the type of microorganisms. For example, people who eat foods of animal origin have a very different microbiome (or gut flora) than those who eat plant-based foods. Research has shown that people who eat a typical American diet have less diverse microbiota than those eating a plant-based diet. The more diversity you have in your gut, the more likely you are to have better digestion, nutrient absorption, and a healthy immune system. Other factors affect it as well, including antibiotics (which tend to wipe out the good bacteria along with the bad) and illness. An imbalance of bacteria is thought Continue reading >>

Probiotics A Diabetes Cure? Amazing Research You Should See

Probiotics A Diabetes Cure? Amazing Research You Should See

Is a cure for diabetes just around the corner thanks to probiotics? Studies on the good bacteria have revealed exciting results that hold promise for the more than 29 million Americans who have diabetes. Probiotics have long been used to treat a variety of stomach ailments because they stimulate growth of beneficial microorganisms in the digestive tract. They are found in foods such as yogurt and sauerkraut and also can also be taken in supplement form. Now, scientists are learning these “friendly” bacteria could also improve insulin levels for diabetics. ALERT: Weird Gut Bacteria Linked to Digestion, Heart, Obesity, Brain Problems An actual diabetes cure is not yet here, but probiotics have been shown to influence blood glucose, or sugar, levels. Researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, reported in 2015 that they were able to reduce blood glucose levels of diabetic rats by administering the probiotic Lactobacillus, according to Medical News Today. The probiotics apparently encouraged intestinal cells to secrete insulin and regulate the blood sugar levels. The researchers indicated it could be possible in the future for diabetics to take a daily probiotic pill to control their condition. In a 2009 study, researchers in Malaysia examined several international studies and concluded probiotics could help prevent onset diabetes and high blood pressure, according to Natural News. SPECIAL: Doctor: You Can Stop Digestion Woes, Heartburn, Gas, Constipation, More Another study involving 25 elderly volunteers found that consuming low-fat milk containing probiotics twice a day reduced the onset of inflammatory induced diabetes, researchers reported in the September 2009 issue of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. The researchers also reported on ano Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Probiotics For Diabetics

The Health Benefits Of Probiotics For Diabetics

OK, so there I was researching some information the other day for a particular blog post, and I came across an article pertaining to probiotics. The fact that I’m not great at multi-tasking, I was immediately sidetracked and became submerged in the world of probiotics and all their amazing health benefits. So what are these little gems all about? How do we go about getting them in our diet? What about other alternatives to increasing the amount that we get? Let’s take a closer look! Well, first off, what are probiotics? Probiotics are microorganisms—such as bacteria, viruses, and yeasts—that can be seen only under a microscope and that are often referred to as “healthy” or “good” bacteria. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and defined by the World Health Organization, probiotics are “live microorganisms, which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.” The benefits of incorporating probiotics into one’s diet have been widely speculated, as little evidence exists to support the long-term health benefits. Despite the lack of formal evidence, the probiotic trend has swept the health and diet industries for their potential cleansing benefits, immune boosting powers, and nutritional value. Benefits of Probiotics Probiotics are believed to protect us in two ways. The first is the role is how probiotics play in our digestive tract. We know that our digestive tract needs a healthy balance between the good and bad bacteria, so what gets in the way of this? It looks like our lifestyle is both the problem and the solution. Foods high in probiotics (Kombucha, Kefir, pickles, tempeh, just to name a few) are an amazing way to start getting more into your system, but poor food ch Continue reading >>

Gut Microbiota, Probiotics And Diabetes

Gut Microbiota, Probiotics And Diabetes

Abstract Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic β cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes. Introduction According to the World Health Organization [1], the global prevalence of diabetes is approximately 10%, reaching up to 33% of the population in some regions. Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, including genetic and environmental factors, and accounts for 3.5% of the mortality cases due to non-communicable chronic diseases. Scientific evidence suggests increased inflammatory stress is related to molecular mechanisms le Continue reading >>

Probiotics Can Help You Normalize Glucose Levels

Probiotics Can Help You Normalize Glucose Levels

When it comes to regulating blood sugar in the body, we instinctively think of the foods we’re eating and how they can help keep us on track. While it’s true that dietary changes are one of the first actions taken when looking to maintain healthy blood glucose and feel healthier, intriguing research is asserting that taking probiotics can also help keep blood sugar levels in check. A world beneath the microscope To understand how good bacteria influences glucose levels and benefits you in numerous other ways, you must first look at where the bacteria resides: your microbiome. Home to trillions of bacteria, your microbiome hosts the delicate balance of microorganisms that comprise 90% of your body. And a great majority of these microbes live within the gut environment. The intestinal tract contains a vast array of metabolites that are naturally produced by your resident gut microbes. Metabolites are little molecules from our bacteria that interact with the cells in your body, and their job is to detect and send chemical messages to your other organs to keep you functioning healthfully. It’s quite the intricate communication system! The bacteria that live within your gut produce proteins that have an assertive influence on these chemical detectors. When the gut microbiome is out of balance, your microbes might not be optimally collaborating with your cells - which can cause all sorts of issues, including the fluctuation of glucose levels and energy homeostasis. What causes our microbiomes to be thrown off-kilter? Factors like age, chronic stress, a diet high in processed foods, exposure to antibiotics, and excessive hygiene practices in our western culture can deplete our good flora, creating a microbial imbalance in our gut. Often, if the good bacteria are wiped ou Continue reading >>

Probiotics For Diabetics

Probiotics For Diabetics

Probiotics are friendly bacteria that are found in foods such as yogurt and in pill supplements and are important for good health. In recent research, probiotics have proven to be important to type 1 and type 2 diabetics. The hope is that using probiotics to alter the type of bacteria in the gut may prevent Type 1 diabetes, and that probiotics may one day be a part of the treatment strategy for Type 2 diabetics. Video of the Day Probiotics are live, active bacteria that are also referred to as cultures. In your digestive tract there is a layer of healthy bacteria. Gut or intestinal flora are healthy bacteria that contribute to colon health and the health of your whole body, says AskDrSears.com. Two of the most common strains include Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Probiotics promote healthy digestion by making your digestive tract a more acidic environment, thus discouraging harmful bacteria that cause stomach upset. Type 1 Diabetes Probiotics have important applications for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Researchers at the University of Florida reported in May 2011 that probiotics can prevent or delay the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Your gut is your body's largest immune system, and taking probiotics is a way of fighting off illness and autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes. The gut flora in Type 2 diabetics may be different from people without diabetes. So say the authors of a report published in Feb. 2010 by "PLoS One," who suggest there is a link between metabolic diseases and the composition of bacterial populations in the intestines. In addition, the report notes that the balance of some bacteria is highly dependent on blood sugar levels. They suggest that gut bacteria should be factored into strategies to control diabetes. Probiotics may help prevent and Continue reading >>

Effect Of Probiotics On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect Of Probiotics On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect of Probiotics on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials Kecheng Yao ,1,A,B,C,D,F,* Linghai Zeng ,1,A,B,C,D,* Qian He ,1,B,C,F,* Wei Wang ,2,C,E,F Jiao Lei ,3,B,D and Xiulan Zou 1,B,E 1Department of Gerontology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 1Department of Gerontology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 1Department of Gerontology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 2Department of Endocrinology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 3Department of General Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 1Department of Gerontology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 1Department of Gerontology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 2Department of Endocrinology, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China 3Department of General Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Three Gorges University and The First Peoples Hospital of Yichang, Yichang, Hubei, P.R. China Corresponding Author: Xiulan Zou, e-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Nov 29; Accepted 2016 Dec 27. This work is licensed under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International ( CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 ) It has been unclear whether s Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes. Can I Take Friendly Bacteria?

I Have Diabetes. Can I Take Friendly Bacteria?

Maybe this is a question you are used to hearing from your diabetic customers. No evidence exists to suggest that people with diabetes should not take probiotics. Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that compromises the body's production of insulin. Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) usually occurs in younger individuals, and makes up less than 15% of all cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes (insulin-resistant diabetes) is much more common, and tends to affect people over the age of 30. Research into probiotics and their effects on patients with diabetes remains relatively sparse. Many people believe that probiotics can be beneficial for diabetics, as probiotic bacteria can improve immunity and should therefore help to correct autoimmune diseases such as diabetes. Furthermore some evidence suggests that the use of probiotics may lower the risk of contracting diabetes in the first instance, by supporting immunity and helping the body to maintain a healthy weight. Research on probiotics and Type 2 diabetes suggests that probiotics can help weight control in patients who are insulin-resistant. There is very little research into Type 1 diabetes and probiotics, but no evidence exists to suggest that probiotics should not be taken. Although we don’t add sugar as a sweetener to any of our products, diabetics should also note that a small amount of fructose is present in ‘Bifidobacteria & fibre’ (formerly known as ‘For maintaining regularity’). There is just 1.6g of fructose in each sachet (by comparison, an average apple has about 10g of fructose), but diabetics may need to factor this into their daily intake of carbohydrate, especially if taking multiple sachets each day. The fructose is present to ensure an even distribution of the bacteria and prebiotic fibr Continue reading >>

Probiotics For The Management Of Diabetes

Probiotics For The Management Of Diabetes

Can probiotics improve A1c’s, plus much more? Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by insulin resistance and subsequent decline in peripheral glucose uptake. Obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and unhealthy behaviors are the most common risk factors of T2DM. It was estimated that diabetes prevalence was 4% in 2010 and was expected to reach 5.4% by 2025. The problem of T2DM is predicted to double in the near future. T2DM leads to serious complications such as nervous system disorders, kidney diseases, and eye problems; thus prevention and treatment should be considered a priority. For centuries, one of the most effective methods of maintaining the balance of intestinal microbiome was the use of probiotics, defined as live microorganisms which, when administered in sufficient amounts, confer health benefit on the host. Products containing probiotic bacteria have been increasingly utilized to prevent or treat numerous disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic idiopathic constipation, obesity, allergic and pulmonary disease, and various types of diarrhea. It has been suggested that probiotics may positively modify metabolic disturbance. There are evidence that probiotic ingestion or supplementation might decrease serum cholesterol level and improve insulin sensitivity. Some studies have evaluated the positive health effects of probiotic dairy products. The purpose of this study is to assess probiotics for the management of diabetes: the ability of probiotics to modify cardio metabolic risk factors in type 2 diabetic subjects. It was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Randomized controlled trials were used in adults with T2DM. The outcomes of interest were fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin concentration, insul Continue reading >>

This Is One Tough (but Safe) Probiotic

This Is One Tough (but Safe) Probiotic

Insulin resistance, hypertension, high cholesterol just a few conditions that probiotics could improve or eliminate The human body is home to more than 100 trillion bacteria. In fact, bacterial cells outnumber human cells by a ratio of 10 to 1. Bacterial cells are just so much smaller that we do not even notice their presence. Although we often think of bacteria as dangerous germs that are harmful to health, many of the bacteria in our body are actually helpful. These “good” bacteria are called probiotics. Increasing your consumption of probiotics is an excellent way to improve overall health. Probiotics can actually be either bacteria or yeast. These single-celled organisms rely on their human hosts (us) for survival. The trillions of bacteria colonizing our guts help significantly with digestion and other physiological processes. Any type of yeast or bacteria that has beneficial effects on health is dubbed a “probiotic.” However, not all probiotics are created equal. Perhaps the most common class of probiotics is known as Lactobacillus. This strain of bacteria is found in yogurt and other fermented foods. For example, Lactobacillus acidophilus is known to aid digestive regulation. However, there are millions of types of probiotics. Some are more beneficial than others, and it is important to choose the right one to best aid your health. Your body is home to a blend of “good” and “bad” microorganisms. Scientists are still not sure of the factors that influence the blend of good and bad bacteria, but genetics, diet, and lifestyle play a role. Maintaining a poor diet or unhealthy lifestyle encourages bad bacteria to flourish the intestines and other locations. This proliferation of harmful bacteria may lead to upset stomach, digestive problems, or certain Continue reading >>

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Diabetes is a dietary and digestive disorder. Clearly, it’s about elevated blood sugar levels. But hey, it’s also more than that. The food we eat feeds the bacteria in our gut. Eat too many carbs/processed foods and you feed the wrong bacteria. Often, diabetics get the disease by doing exactly that. Too much sugar simply translates into the overgrowth of bad bacteria (like yeast). So, it comes as no surprise that probiotics (good gut bacteria) and diabetes are closely linked. Direct Impact Of Probiotics On Diabetes Probiotics play a huge role in digestion. Many of us are ignorant about the importance and benefits of probiotics. Probiotics, or good gut bacteria, should ideally comprise at least 80% of the total gut bacteria. If you are diabetic, adding probiotics, as either food or supplements, can change things dramatically. Of course, you also need to eat the right diet to feed the right bacteria after that. Some of the best probiotics for diabetics modify disturbances in their metabolisms positively. There is strong scientific evidence supporting the fact that consuming probiotics helps decrease the serum cholesterol level and improves insulin sensitivity. RELATED: Meditation And Type 2 Diabetes Probiotics and Diabetes: The Science Behind It How does probiotics help diabetics? Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in correct dosages and form, give you a ton of health benefits. Probiotic supplements have been proven to have positive effects on cardio-metabolic parameters in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. According to research conducted at Loughborough University, probiotics prevent insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is often caused by consuming foods that contain trans fats for a long time. The study found that a high trans-fat and process Continue reading >>

Probiotics May Lower Blood Sugar In Diabetics

Probiotics May Lower Blood Sugar In Diabetics

Probiotics May Lower Blood Sugar in Diabetics Imbalanced gut microbiota may be one of the underlying causes of type 2 diabetes, and changing this environment may help improve symptoms. Recently, a team of scientists examined the effects of beneficial, probiotic bacteria on blood sugar control in type 2 diabetics. Here is a detailed summary of their findings, published inClinical Nutrition. Type 2 diabetes has been associated with dysbiosis an imbalance in the bacterial community in the gut ( 1 ). Two studies even suggest that high numbers of undesirable gut bacteria may play a direct role in the development of type 2 diabetes ( 2 , 3 ). Supplementing regularly with probiotics may help change the gut environment. In diabetics,Lactobacillusprobiotics may have beneficial effects on blood sugar control and blood lipids ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). A group of scientists from Brazil looked at the effects of probiotic supplementation on several markers of diabetes. Clinical application of probiotics in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. This was a 6-week, randomized controlled trial examining the effects of probiotics on blood sugar control, blood lipids and inflammatory markers. A total of 45 men and women with type 2 diabetes participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Probiotic group:Participants in this group consumed 120 grams of fermented goats milk every day for 6 weeks. The milk contained two kinds of probiotics,Lactobacillus acidophilusandBifidobacterium animalis. Control group:Participants in this group consumed 120 grams of conventional, fermented goats milk per day. It contained the probioticStreptococcus thermophilus. At the beginning and the end of the study, the researchers measured blood sugar Continue reading >>

Both Types Of Diabetes Could Be Cured By A Daily Probiotic Pill That 'rewires' The Body, Scientists Claim

Both Types Of Diabetes Could Be Cured By A Daily Probiotic Pill That 'rewires' The Body, Scientists Claim

A simple probiotic pill that 'rewires' the body could cure both types of diabetes, scientists claim. The new drug, which contains live bacteria from the human gut, has been shown to drastically lower blood sugar levels. The pancreas is the organ which controls glucose levels in the body in healthy individuals. But scientists at Cornell University in New York discovered a protein secreted from a human probiotic could shift that control from the pancreas to the upper intestine. Scroll down for video The breakthrough, which relies on 'rewiring' the body, could, the Cornell team hope, pave the way for a cure for both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Professor John March, who led the new research, said their findings are a 'proof of principle' which could prove the first step to developing a cure. He told the Express: 'If it works really well in people, it could be that they just take the pill and wouldn't have to do anything else to control their diabetes. 'It's likely, though, that it will be used in conjunction with some other treatment.' Diabetes is a life-long health condition where there is too much glucose in the blood because the body cannot use it properly. The pancreas of a diabetes sufferer is unable to produce any insulin, or not enough. It can also be the case the insulin produced is unable to work properly. Insulin is essential to the body, acting as the key that unlocks the door to the body's cells so glucose can enter and provide energy. With diabetes, the body is unable to use glucose as fuel and instead glucose builds up in the blood. Professor March's team engineered a strain of lactobacillus, a human probiotic commonly found in the gut, to secrete a peptide - a hormone that releases insulin in response to food entering the body. The scientists then gave a group of Continue reading >>

Review Effect Of Probiotics On Glucose Metabolism In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Review Effect Of Probiotics On Glucose Metabolism In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Abstract Our aim was to investigate the effects of probiotics on glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Online databases Embase, Web of Science, and PubMed were searched until August 2014 to identify eligible articles. Finally, 7 trials were included. Probiotic consumption significantly changed fasting plasma glucose (FPG) by −15.92 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], −29.75 to −2.09) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by −0.54% (95% CI, −0.82 to −0.25) compared with control groups. Subgroup analysis was conducted to trials with non-yogurts control. Meta-analysis of trials with multiple species of probiotics found a significant reduction in FPG (weighted mean difference [WMD]: −35.41 mg/dL, 95% CI: −51.98 to −18.89). The duration of intervention for ≥8 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in FPG (WMD: −20.34 mg/dL, 95% CI: −35.92 to −4.76). Subgroup analysis of trials with species of probiotics did not result in a significant meta-analysis effect. Furthermore, the duration of intervention <8 weeks did not result in a significant reduction in FPG. The results also showed that probiotic therapy significantly decreased homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin concentration (WMD: −1.08, 95% CI: −1.88 to −0.28; and WMD: −1.35 mIU/L, 95% CI: −2.38 to −0.31, respectively). The present meta-analysis suggests that consuming probiotics may improve glucose metabolism by a modest degree, with a potentially greater effect when the duration of intervention is ≥8 weeks, or multiple species of probiotics are consumed. Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Probiotics And Prebiotics For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Probiotics And Prebiotics For Diabetes

For holistic practitioners, the gut has always been central to health. In naturopathic medicine, for example, student physicians have long been taught to heal gut first—that health simply cannot be achieved without a healthy digestive system that can take in nutrients, digest them, absorb them and then eliminate the waste. One of the first aspects of digestive health that is commonly addressed is the health of the microbiome—the collection of bacteria that live in our guts in a symbiotic and mutualistic relationship with us. Symbiotic mutualism is the phrase used to describe the mutually beneficial relationship between these gut bacteria and us. Many people are surprised to learn that there are more bacteria in our bodies than our own human cells–some estimates suggest that there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in our body than our own cells! The microbiome affects overall health, weight and can significantly affect the risk of diseases such as heart disease, cancer, mental health, diabetes, obesity, stroke and other conditions., There are over 1000 different species of bacteria in the healthy microbiome. In general, the more diversity that exists in the microbiome, the better it is for our health. The bacteria in our guts produce or help to produce vitamins, neurotransmitters such as serotonin that can affect mood and are critically important in training or educating out immune systems to respond to dangerous pathologic bacteria, viruses and other infectious organisms.[1] To give just one example regarding the importance of the microbiome, when scientists transfer gut bacteria from thin, lean mice to the guts of obese mice, those obese mice begin to lose weight and over time, resemble the lean mice![2] The Microbiome and Diabetes A dysfunctional gut microbio Continue reading >>

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