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Diabetes And Parasites

Natural Treatment For Type I Diabetes

Natural Treatment For Type I Diabetes

Let me start by saying: the damage done by Type 1 Diabetes can be completely stopped and the patient can completely get off of all of their prescription drugs. Type 1 Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas. It is in the pancreas where the “beta cells” reside. It is commonly believed in medical circles that the cause of type 1 diabetes is the failure of beta cells to create insulin and because of the lack of insulin, the body is unable to regulate glucose. However, modern medicine has a serious problem with understanding the difference between “cause and effect.” For example, modern medicine notices that cancer cells have DNA damage. They, therefore, claim that DNA damage is what “causes” cancer. This is nonsense, the DNA damage cannot occur until after the cancer cell is already cancerous (see the “Home Page” of this website). The DNA damage is actually a “symptom” of cancer. Many times in medicine, researchers have seen a “symptom” of a health problem and attributed the “symptom” to be a “cause” of the health problem. They frequently can't tell the difference between a “cause” and a “symptom.” This is important because if they “treat” the symptom, they have not fixed the “cause”! You cannot fix the “cause” until you know what to fix. This is exactly the problem with type 1 diabetes. Scientists see one of the “symptoms” of type 1 diabetes, and call it a “cause.” What modern medicine calls the “root cause” of type 1 diabetes (the destruction of beta cells in the pancreas) is in fact, a symptom of a much broader problem. The damage to the beta cells is simply one piece of a chain reaction of events. What really causes type 1 diabetes is infections in the liver and gallbladder. These infections cause the pancre Continue reading >>

Helminth Infection And Type 1 Diabetes

Helminth Infection And Type 1 Diabetes

Received 2012 Dec 21; Revised 2013 Jan 15; Accepted 2013 Feb 1. Copyright 2012, SBDR - Society for Biomedical Diabetes Research This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune diseases in industrialized countries cannot be exclusively explained by genetic factors. Human epidemiological studies and animal experimental data provide accumulating evidence for the role of environmental factors, such as infections, in the regulation of allergy and autoimmune diseases. The hygiene hypothesis has formally provided a rationale for these observations, suggesting that our co-evolution with pathogens has contributed to the shaping of the present-day human immune system. Therefore, improved sanitation, together with infection control, has removed immunoregulatory mechanisms on which our immune system may depend. Helminths are multicellular organisms that have developed a wide range of strategies to manipulate the host immune system to survive and complete their reproductive cycles successfully. Immunity to helminths involves profound changes in both the innate and adaptive immune compartments, which can have a protective effect in inflammation and autoimmunity. Recently, helminth-derived antigens and molecules have been tested in vitro and in vivo to explore possible applications in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including T1D. This exciting approach presents numerous challenges that will need to be addressed before it can reach safe clinical application. This review outlines basic insight into the ability of helminths to modulate the onset and progression of T1D, and frames some of the challenges that helminth-derived therapies may face in the context of clinical translation. Keywords: t Continue reading >>

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis For Type 1 Therapy

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis For Type 1 Therapy

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis for Type 1 Therapy The idea of parasitic worms causes a shudder in most people. The very thought of some wriggly segmented thing latching onto an internal organ and ransacking it for nourishment is not pleasant. But the scientists who study the creatures may be on to a whole new tack in the fight against type 1 diabetes. It turns out that people who suffer from parasitic worms experience an unexpected beneficial side effect: the worms exert control over the human immune system that seems to protect against several inflammatory diseases, including asthma, Crohns disease, multiple sclerosis, allergies, and type 1 diabetes. According to an article published in the April 9, 2010, online edition of Technology Review , produced by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both humans and animals afflicted with parasitic worms experience fewer allergies and immune diseases. And its true that as modern medicine and sanitation in wealthy nations have reduced the acquisition of parasitic worms, the incidence of allergies and inflammatory ailments has increased. In the article, Fighting Allergies by Mimicking Parasitic Worms, one Tufts University researcher theorizes that the human association with parasitic worms goes so far back that the relationship between them became mutually beneficial rather than combative. In exchange for access to all the goodies of the human digestive system and other internal organs, the worms conferred immunity or resistance to several diseases that are almost epidemic in modern times. Nobody knows just how the worms confer their protection. Scientists know that when people become infected by parasitic worms, it spurs an allergic response and levels of an antibody called IgE (immunoglobulin E) go up. In people witho Continue reading >>

Intestinal Parasites In Diabetic Patients In Sohag University Hospitals, Egypt.

Intestinal Parasites In Diabetic Patients In Sohag University Hospitals, Egypt.

INTESTINAL PARASITES IN DIABETIC PATIENTS IN SOHAG UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, EGYPT. Elnadi NA , Hassanien HA , Ahmad AM , Abd Ellah AK . Intestinal parasites usually create benign diseases, though they may induce complications with high morbidity and mortality to the immunocompromised, including diabetic patients. The study detected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in diabetic patients, comparing to non-diabetic controls and other parameters. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected from diabetic patients at the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospitals and another 100 from cross matched controls. The samples were examined macroscopically and microscopically by direct smear and different concentration methods then stained by Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Acid fast stain. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb Alc) was measured to detect DM controlled patients. The data were organized, tabulated, and statistically analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 25 (25%) cases out of 100 patients in diabetic group and 7(7%) cases out of 100 controls with high significance (P<0.001)). In the diabetic group, Giardia lamblia was detected in 22 cases (22%) and 5 (5%) among controls, Entamoeba histolytica in 7 cases (7%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Hymenolypis nana in 5 cases (5%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Entamoeba coli in 8 patients (8%), Entamoeba hartmanni in 3 cases (3%), Dientamoeba fragilis in a case (1%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 cases (5%) and microsporidia in 3 cases (3%). But, E. coli, E. hartmanni, D. fragilis and C. parvum nor microsporidia were detected in controls. The rate of G. lamblia in DM patients compared to controls was high significant (P<0.001). Hymenolepis nana was 5% (5 cases) in diabetic patients compared to 3% (3 cases) in controls. Residence and s Continue reading >>

Original Article Intestinal Parasitic Infections Among Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Original Article Intestinal Parasitic Infections Among Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood glucose, either because the body does not produce enough insulin, or cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among DM patients as well as the risk factors involved in the acquisition of these parasitic infections. A total of 180 individuals were included in this study. The study group consisted of 150 (41 males and 109 females) DM patients attending clinics, and 30 (7 males and 23 females) non-DM individuals served as controls. Stool and blood specimens were obtained from each participant to detect intestinal parasites and to determine hemoglobin concentration using standard techniques. An overall prevalence of 18.7% of intestinal parasitic infections among DM patients was observed in this study. DM status was significantly associated with intestinal parasitic infections (odds ratio = 14.192; 95% confidence interval = 0.842, 239.22; p = 0.022). Age and type of toilet significantly (p = 0.047 and p < 0.0001, respectively) affected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in DM patients. Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, and Entamoeba histolytica were the parasites recovered from DM patients with no parasites detected among non-DM individuals. Routine diagnosis of intestinal parasites is advocated among DM patients. Continue reading >>

Parasite-killing Drug May Reverse Diabetes By Targeting Fat Cells, Restoring Insulin Sensitivity

Parasite-killing Drug May Reverse Diabetes By Targeting Fat Cells, Restoring Insulin Sensitivity

Parasite-Killing Drug May Reverse Diabetes By Targeting Fat Cells, Restoring Insulin Sensitivity Our world's modernization has brought with it a host of health problems, with one of the most prevalent among them being type 2 diabetes. It's only within the past few years that diabetes has manged to grow so drastically, affecting 347 million people worldwide this number's expected to double in the coming years. Diabetes medications can only stop symptoms of the disease, and there are currently no treatments for the underlying causes. That's about to change, however, with new research showing that a modified version of the drug niclosamide, which is used to kill intestinal parasites, can also attack diabetes at its source. The research, led by Victor Shengkan Jin from Rutgers University, was published on Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine . Gastric bypass surgery, a type of weight loss surgery, has been shown to help diabetics control their symptoms, however, it carries a significant risk and can only be performed on very obese patients. So, researchers are trying to find ways to help diabetics for whom weight loss surgery isn't an option. Type 2 diabetes rendersthe body unable to efficiently use insulin, the hormone that metabolizes blood sugar. In many cases, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin, resulting in insulin resistance and rising blood sugar levels. A major cause of insulin resistance is the accumulation of excess fat in the cells of the liver, as well as in the muscle tissue, Jin said. This fat disrupts the normal functions of insulin, which helps blood sugar energize cells in the tissue. As a result, glucose remains in the bloodstream, damaging tissue and causing blindness, kidney damage, heart disease, and other health problems. Jin and his co Continue reading >>

The Root Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes Could Be A Common Childhood Viral Infection

The Root Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes Could Be A Common Childhood Viral Infection

A young child becomes very thirsty very often and seems tired all the time. A visit to the pediatrician determines she has type 1 diabetes. The onset of type 1 diabetes may seem sudden, and it can be, but the disease may actually have been triggered by common childhood viruses years earlier. Type 1 diabetes—also called diabetes mellitus—was previously called juvenile-onset diabetes because most people affected with this disease are diagnosed as children and young adults. It isn't the most common form of diabetes and only 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. That doesn't make it any less serious—in fact, it can be a life-threatening disease. When we eat something, our body converts carbohydrates and starches in the food into sugar (glucose), which is then processed by our bodies to either be used or stored for later. People with type 1 diabetes have trouble keeping their blood sugar level even: It spikes when they eat something and goes very low if they don't. That's because their pancreas doesn't make insulin, the hormone that in a healthy human moves glucose from the blood into cells where it can be used for energy, keeping it from spiking after eating. Type 1 diabetics must constantly monitor their blood sugar and take insulin to keep their levels within a normal range to keep this process running. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, a disease where the body forms antibodies to itself and attacks parts of its own body. In this case, antibodies are formed to the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Experts believe type 1 diabetes may be caused by a genetic risk factors and environmental factors, including viruses. A viral link to type 1 diabetes is one of the findings in a new study led by Hanna Honkanen and Heikki Hyöty in th Continue reading >>

Host-parasite Interactions In Individuals With Type 1 And 2 Diabetes Result In Higher Frequency Of Ascaris Lumbricoides And Giardia Lamblia In Type 2 Diabetic Individuals

Host-parasite Interactions In Individuals With Type 1 And 2 Diabetes Result In Higher Frequency Of Ascaris Lumbricoides And Giardia Lamblia In Type 2 Diabetic Individuals

Host-Parasite Interactions in Individuals with Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Result in Higher Frequency of Ascaris lumbricoides and Giardia lamblia in Type 2 Diabetic Individuals Eleuza Rodrigues Machado ,1,2 Nbia Oliveira Matos ,1 Sinione Morais Rezende ,1 Daniela Carlos ,3 Thauana Cristina Silva ,1 Lenia Rodrigues ,1 Maria Jarlene Rodrigues Almeida ,1 Maria Regina Fernandes de Oliveira ,4,5 Maria Imaculada Muniz-Junqueira ,6 and Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonalves 2 1Curso de Enfermagem, Faculdade Anhanguera de Braslia, Unidade Taguatinga, Universidade Kroton, Taguatinga, DF, Brazil 2Laboratrio de Parasitologia Mdica e Biologia de Vetores, rea de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Braslia, Asa Norte, 70904-970 Brasilia, DF, Brazil 3Laboratrio de Imunologia, Departamento de Bioqumica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de So Paulo de Ribeiro Preto, Ribeiro Preto, SP, Brazil 4Ncleo de Medicina Tropical, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Braslia, Brasilia, DF, Brazil 5National Institute for Science and Technology for Health Technology Assessment (IATS/CNPq), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil 6Laboratrio de Imunologia Celular, rea de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Braslia, Brasilia, DF, Brazil Correspondence should be addressed to Eleuza Rodrigues Machado ; [email protected] Received 25 September 2017; Revised 6 December 2017; Accepted 13 December 2017; Published 6 February 2018 Copyright 2018 Eleuza Rodrigues Machado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Host-parasite interactions in diabetic patients might influence diabetes complications and int Continue reading >>

The 25 Causes Of Diabetes

The 25 Causes Of Diabetes

Throughout the 18 years that I have lived with Type 1 Diabetes, I read a lot about the subject, visited different types of physicians, and tried different diets and alternative treatments. My research and experience made it clear to me that there are many possible causes for diabetes and, therefore, there are many types of therapies or treatments for it. I am providing a list of all possible causes (of either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes) that I’ve heard of or read about. Many of them will not be “officially” recognized as causes of diabetes, but if you know me you also know that “official” matters little to me! Since no one seems to know the exact causes, the list is more of a collection of hypotheses of possible causes. Many doctors and websites say that the main cause of diabetes is the body’s inability to produce insulin or even insulin resistance. In my opinion, these are symptoms, not actual causes. 25 Possible Causes of Diabetes 1. Hereditary: this is one of the main hypotheses for causes of diabetes, which appears to have a consensus among allopathic doctors, naturalists, and scientists. In some countries diabetes may be more prevalent than in others, since several members of one family might have the disease. The thing about having a hereditary disease is that you don’t know for sure if it will develop; it depends on other factors that trigger the gene that activates diabetes. There are cases of twins, one of them developed diabetes and the other did not. Therefore, if you have a family member who has or had diabetes, you should take care of proper nutrition, exercise, and avoiding stress (or developing good coping mechanisms!) to ensure the lowest chance of developing diabetes. 2. Lifestyle: this is another one of the most acknowledged causes of dia Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Parasites

Diabetes And Parasites

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community This is a bit gross, so sorry if you're eating your tea! My 4 year old was diagnosed 3 weeks ago, and we've found a pattern of ridiculous blood glucose rise as soon as she goes to bed - have had to increase her basal by 150% A couple of days ago, I found out she had threadworm/pinworm (had put the itchy "bits" down to the diabetes, but now it may not have been). Anyhows, we treated her yesterday, and last night she was running hypo all night. I don't know if these hyperglycemic episodes were related to the pinworm, or if it's a co-incidence. Anyone else come across anything similar? Poor little soul, it must have driven her mad. Young children are particularly susceptible to pinworms and I don't envy you doing all the cleaning involved now that it has been discovered. Cannot help with the query about the hypos but someone will be along to give an answer. To anyone who has not heard of pinworms, a good article here explaining causes, symptoms and treatments. Thanks all for your replies. I'm steaming every piece of fabric, disinfecting every surface and vacuuming as if my life depended on it - urghh! No weight loss - we caught her diabetes very quickly. She lost weight the week after diagnosis with avoiding food because she didn't want to get "spiked" and also her sugars were runninng really high as we tried to sort out her dosage. Her weight normalised the following week and things have now settled, with sugars running near normal 90% of the time Her hyperglycemia occurs just after she falls asleep and will jump from 5 to 20mmol within 3 hours of going to bed. The pattern has been constant since a week or so after diagnosis once we had figured out her Continue reading >>

Parasites 'how They Made My Diabetes Worse'

Parasites 'how They Made My Diabetes Worse'

Parasites 'How they made my diabetes worse' February 2013 (Vol. 23 Issue 11) in Diabetes , Giardiasis , Headaches , Pain , Reflux 'They told me it was in my mind, but it was in my gut' 'They told me it was in my mind, but it was in my gut' When Alice Francis's diabetes suddenly got worse after a trip to India, doctors believed the problem was psychological. In fact, Alice was infected with parasites You would think it was enough that a nine-year-old girl should be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have to learn to inject herself with insulin every day. But that was just the start of Alice Francis's story. When she was 17, her diabetes mysteriously worsened; eventually, she was injecting herself with 12 times her usual dose, and yet on several occasions she needed emergency care to save her life. Her health problems were exacerbated by the attitude of the doctors who 'cared for her' during her two-year ordeal as her diabetes progressively worsened. Throughout, they were of the mind-set that insulin does-in fact, must-work and if it doesn't, the problem must lie with her. Alice was clearly a 'non-compliant' diabetic in their eyes-a bad patient whose problems were more psychological than physical. Today, Alice has her diabetes under control and the solution to her worsening diabetes may shed light on the treatment of the disease, if only the medical profession were prepared to listen. But that's not the reason she wants her story told. She and her parents, Barbara and Russell, are angry. They are angry about the way she was treated, the way she was sneered at by one consultant because she arrived at the hospital in a wheelchair, too weak to walk, and also by the other doctors who never carried out tests or wondered whether her medical crisis might actually have a physica Continue reading >>

Can Parasites Prevent Autoimmune Diabetes?

Can Parasites Prevent Autoimmune Diabetes?

Home / Human Food Project /Can parasites prevent autoimmune diabetes? Can parasites prevent autoimmune diabetes? Coronado Biosciences, a company seeking FDA approval for a type of medicalized parasite, recently announced the beginning of a very interesting trial on Type 1 diabetes. Coronado is running a number of studies with a whipworm called Trichuris suis, which is native to pigs. Its testing the parasite on several immune-mediated disorders, including Crohns and psoriasis. Early studies on inflammatory bowel disease showed tremendous promise. The study on type 1 diabetes is particularly interesting, however, because rather than treat an existing disease, the trial will attempt to PREVENT its emergence. Prevention, obviously, is the best medicine. And one of the tantalizing but-not-yet-fully-realized promises of Darwinian medicine of bearing in mind the ancestral environment that shaped the human organism is that it allows for novel hypotheses as to how diseases emerge, and how to head them off entirely. In this case, the idea is that a timely introduction of parasites could squelch an incipient autoimmune storm. Type 1 diabetes is much more common among carriers of certain variants of the human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQ, an immune-system gene. Disease onset is predicted by the appearance of two types of self-directed antibody. But you can display one of these antibodies without yet having the disease. So the scientists running the study will know whos on the path to developing autoimmune diabetes before it becomes overt. How might parasites help? Type 1 diabetes results from a breakdown of tolerance toward ones own tissuesin this case, the insulin-producing islet cells of the pancreasand their subsequent destruction. As part of their survival mechanisms, parasites s Continue reading >>

World First Trial To Cure Diabetes With Parasitic Hookworms - Diabetes Queensland

World First Trial To Cure Diabetes With Parasitic Hookworms - Diabetes Queensland

Young overweight women will beinfected with parasitic worms in a world-first clinical trial beingconducted in Cairns to combat Type 2 diabetes. James Cook University scientistsare recruiting female volunteers for a new research project thatwill use hookworms as a possible therapy for those at risk ofchronic disease to improve their overall health. Some research in mice has foundthat infections of the parasites can protect that animals againstdiabetes by releasing anti-inflammatory molecules within theirbody. The two-year study, which will be carried out by researcherswithin JCU's Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine,and the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, will examine theeffects of hookworm infestations on women at risk of diabetes, tosee if there is a similar result in humans. Overweight women aged 18-44 will be inoculated with a dose ofhookworm larvae, and their health monitored via regular medicalassessments. The research team includes Dr Paul Giacomin, who is involved inhuman trials for parasitic worms that show promise in treatinginflammation in patients with coeliac disease. He described the parasitic worms as being masters of controllinginflammation. "We now have the opportunity to conduct a world-first trial intothe safety and potential benefits that infections with parasiticworms have in humans who are at risk of metabolic diseases," hesaid. "This trial will be critical for determining whether we shouldstart looking for the active molecules that worms release into thebody to control metabolism, which could be produced as a drug forpreventing Type 2 diabetes." The researchers said that obesity and Type 2 diabetes areincreasing in Australia's population, which can lead to disabilityand early death from kidney failure, heart disease andinfe Continue reading >>

How Having Worms Could Ward Off Diabetes

How Having Worms Could Ward Off Diabetes

Posted by Carl Blesch-Rutgers September 11th, 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. Worms could be the next weapon in the fight against autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohns disease, and lupus. The worms, or helminths as biologists call them, are small parasites that live in human intestines, especially in the developing world. According to an article in Nature Reviews Immunology by Rutgers immunologist William Gause and colleagues, the worms presence through millennia of human evolution likely has led to an immune response called type 2 immunity. This includes immune regulatory pathways that help control the inflammation that can contribute to autoimmune diseases. The immune reaction, the researchers say, appears to have developed as a way to rapidly repair wounds caused by these invaders as they move through the body. In fact, components of the type 2 immune response may someday be used to enhance the wound healing process. Additionally, this response triggers regulatory networks that block harmful immune responses, or inflammation, that otherwise would exacerbate the tissue injury. What we would like to do now is harness components of the type 2 immune response to target the control of harmful inflammation that can lead to autoimmune diseases like diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease, says Gause, of the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. He adds that inflammatory responses also have been linked to other diseases, including cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders, and even to allergic reactions and fibrosis that may result when titanium shavings that flake away from artificial joints settle in the body. Finding new ways to stimulate these regulatory components of the type Continue reading >>

The True Cause Of Type Ii Diabetes - Parasites

The True Cause Of Type Ii Diabetes - Parasites

In my research to cure my own onset of diabetes, I took the biological path to find the source of diabetes type 2. "In every case of the So-called 'mysterious' disease DIABETES, you find the not-so-mysterious parasite Eurytrema Pancreaticum (aka pancreatic fluke), and the common pollutant wood alcohol . . . in every case . . . and never in healthy people! Similarly in cancer, HIV, Alzheimer's. . . to name a few, you can find specific parasites and/or pollutants at work." What is pancreatic fluke? All diabetics have a common fluke parasite, Eurytrema pancreaticum , the pancreatic fluke of cattle, in their own pancreas. It seems likely that we get it from cattle, repeatedly, by eating their meat or dairy products in a raw state. It is not hard to kill with a zapper but because of its infective stages in our food supply we can immediately be reinfected. Eurytrema will not settle and multiply in our pancreas without the presence of wood alcohol (methanol). Methanol pollution pervades our food supply -- it is found in processed food including bottled water, artificial sweetener, soda pop, baby formula and powdered drinks of all kinds including health food varieties. I presume wood alcohol is used to wash equipment used in manufacturing. If your child has diabetes, use nothing out of a can, package or bottle except regular milk, and no processed foods. By killing this parasite and removing wood alcohol from the diet, the need for insulin can be cut in half in three weeks (or sooner!). Be vigilant with your blood sugar checks.The pancreas with its tiny islets that produce insulin recovers very quickly. Even if 90% of them were destroyed, requiring daily insulin shots, half of them can recover or regenerate so insulin is no longer necessary. The insulin shot itself may be pollu Continue reading >>

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