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Diabetes And Osteopenia

Osteopenia (bone Loss) Update: Natural Treatment, Anti-inflammatory Diet, Diabetes, Psoriatic Arthritis

Osteopenia (bone Loss) Update: Natural Treatment, Anti-inflammatory Diet, Diabetes, Psoriatic Arthritis

Special Report: Secret of Healthy Digestion and Regularity Get this report FREE when you opt in for our FREE Health eTalk daily newsletter along with exclusive offers from Bel Marra Health and third party partners You may opt-out at any time. Privacy Policy Home Bone Health Osteopenia (bone loss) update: Natural treatment, anti-inflammatory diet, diabetes, psoriatic arthritis Osteopenia (bone loss) update: Natural treatment, anti-inflammatory diet, diabetes, psoriatic arthritis By: Bel Marra Health | Bone Health | Sunday, February 19, 2017 - 05:30 AM In case you missed it, here is Bel Marra Healths roundup on osteopenia decreased bone densityfeaturing information on what factors contribute to bone loss, natural treatment options, anti-inflammatory diet tips for stronger bones, and how psoriasis affects bone density. Four factors that contribute to bone loss Bone loss, and more specifically osteoporosis, is often identified as a female health problem, but men are not immune to losing bone density. There are many factors that can contribute to bone loss, so practicing bone-boosting habits is essential, especially as you age. Bones are composed of minerals, the most predominant being calcium. The body goes through a process called resorption, meaning it breaks down old bone and creates newer, stronger ones. Unfortunately, as we age, this becomes more difficult. The quicker old bone breaks down the more the need for new bone increases, but older adults simply do not create new bone as quickly as someone who is young. Bone loss can lead to osteopenia, which can evolve into osteoporosis. Bone disease can increase fractures and breaks and can negatively impact a persons life. Here are four factors that can contribute to bone loss, aside from aging, and what you can do to prev Continue reading >>

Osteoporosis Among Patients With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes - Em|consulte

Osteoporosis Among Patients With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes - Em|consulte

Received:20August2007; accepted:26October2007 Osteoporosis among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes A.Rkel a , b , O.Sheehy a , E.Rahme b , J.LeLorier a , aResearch Group in Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Research Centre, centre hospitalier de luniversit de Montral (CHUM), Htel-Dieu, 3850, rue St-Urbain, H2W 1T7, Montral, Qubec, Canada bDivision of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montral, Qubec, Canada Both diabetes and fractures are prevalent in adults. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis is complex and, although it has been investigated extensively, the subject remains controversial. While low bone mineral density (BMD) is consistently observed in type 1 diabetes, the relationship is less clear in type 2 diabetes, with some studies reporting modestly increased or unchanged BMD. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been associated with a higher risk of fractures. Despite discrepancies between BMD and fracture rates, clinical trials uniformly support the fact that new bone formation and bone microarchitecture and, thus, bone quality, are altered in both types of diabetes. Although a causal association between diabetes and osteoporosis cannot be established on the basis of existing data, it is possible to conclude from many studies and from a better understanding of the physiopathology of diabetes that it can increase the risk of fractures through skeletal (decreased BMD and bone quality) and extraskeletal (increased risk of falls) factors. Even though osteoporosis screening or prophylactic treatment in all patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes is not being recommended at present, such patient populations should be given general guidelines regarding calcium and vitamin D intakes, exercise and the avoidance of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Osteopenia By Decreased -catenin Signaling Is Partly Induced By Epigenetic Derepression Of Sfrp-4 Gene

Diabetic Osteopenia By Decreased -catenin Signaling Is Partly Induced By Epigenetic Derepression Of Sfrp-4 Gene

Diabetic Osteopenia by Decreased -Catenin Signaling Is Partly Induced by Epigenetic Derepression of sFRP-4 Gene Affiliations Department of Pathology, Division of Diagnostic Molecular Pathology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan, Department of Pathology, National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Hoenzaka, Chuo-ku, Osaka City, Japan Affiliations Department of Pathology, Division of Diagnostic Molecular Pathology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan, Department of Molecular Pathology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon City, Ehime, Japan, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Ehime University Hospital, Shitsukawa, Toon City, Ehime, Japan Affiliations Department of Pathology, Division of Diagnostic Molecular Pathology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan, Department of Legal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan Affiliation Department of Pathology, Division of Diagnostic Molecular Pathology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan Affiliation Department of Therapeutic Nutrition, Institute of Health Bioscience, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima City, Japan Affiliation Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan Affiliation Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan Affiliation Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Ehime University Hospital, Shitsukawa, Toon City, Ehime, Japan Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe City, Japan Affiliations Department of Pathology, Division of Diagnostic Molecular Pathology, Kobe University Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Osteopenia: Is There An Association?

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Osteopenia: Is There An Association?

Type 2 diabetes mellitus and osteopenia: is there an association? Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cukurova University, Medical Faculty, 01330 Balcali-Adana, Turkey. We report the results of bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison to healthy controls. In this prospective study, a total of 277 subjects (aged 30-60 years) with type 2 diabetes mellitus, outpatients at the Cukurova Medical School Hospital, were evaluated for BMD at L(1)-L(4) lumbar vertebrae and at the femur (neck, trochanter, Ward's triangle and total) by DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry). The patients' diabetes duration, treatment, glycemic control and chronic diabetic complications were recorded, and these data were evaluated for any relationship in respect to the BMD measurements. BMD results of the diabetic patients were compared with those of 262 healthy non-diabetic control subjects living in the same geographic region. BMD was found to be increased at the femoral neck among diabetic women and men aged 51-60 years. However, BMD values at lumbar regions of diabetic men where lower than control in all age group. There was no difference in values of BMD for both genders in the other regions. Type 2 diabetic patients may have lower, similar or higher BMD measurements at different ages and anatomic regions, so each patient should be evaluated individually. Further studies are needed to make a conclusion on this issue. Continue reading >>

Osteopenia - Wikipedia

Osteopenia - Wikipedia

Osteopenia is a condition in which bone mineral density is lower than normal. It is considered by many doctors to be a precursor to osteoporosis . However, not every person diagnosed with osteopenia will develop osteoporosis. More specifically, osteopenia is defined as a bone mineral density T-score between 1.0 and 2.5. [1] [2] Like osteoporosis, osteopenia occurs more frequently in post-menopausal women as a result of the loss of estrogen. It can also be exacerbated by lifestyle factors such as lack of exercise, excess consumption of alcohol, smoking or prolonged use of glucocorticoid medications. It can also be a result of exposure to radiation. [3] Osteopenia occurs more frequently in participants in non-weight-bearing sports like bicycling or swimming than in participants in weight-bearing sports like powerlifting and running , since bone-loading exercise tends to protect or possibly increase bone mineral density. [4] [5] [6] In particular, the condition is often noted in young female athletes. It is one of the three major components of female athlete triad syndrome , along with amenorrhea and disordered eating . Female athletes tend to have lower body weight, lower fat percentage, and higher incidence of asthma than their less active peers. A chronic negative energy balance can suppress estrogen levels and decrease bone mineral density . [7] It is also a sign of normal aging , in contrast to osteoporosis which is present in pathologic aging. Osteopenia is also a common effect of coeliac disease , even among patients who are otherwise asymptomatic. [8] Scans of bones anywhere in the body can be done with X-rays, known as DEXA ( dual X-ray absorptiometry ). Scans can also be done with portable scanners using ultrasound, and portable X-ray machines can measure densit Continue reading >>

Impact Of Diabetes And Diabetes Medications On Bone Health | Endocrine Reviews | Oxford Academic

Impact Of Diabetes And Diabetes Medications On Bone Health | Endocrine Reviews | Oxford Academic

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of fragility fractures despite increased body weight and normal or higher bone mineral density. The mechanisms by which T2DM increases skeletal fragility are unclear. It is likely that a combination of factors, including a greater risk of falling, regional osteopenia, and impaired bone quality, contributes to the increased fracture risk. Drugs for the treatment of T2DM may also impact on the risk for fractures. For example, thiazolidinediones accelerate bone loss and increase the risk of fractures, particularly in older women. In contrast, metformin and sulfonylureas do not appear to have a negative effect on bone health and may, in fact, protect against fragility fracture. Animal models indicate a potential role for incretin hormones in bone metabolism, but there are only limited data on the impact of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists on bone health in humans. Animal models also have demonstrated a role for amylin in bone metabolism, but clinical trials in patients with type 1 diabetes with an amylin analog (pramlintide) have not shown a significant impact on bone metabolism. The effects of insulin treatment on fracture risk are inconsistent with some studies showing an increased risk and others showing no effect. Finally, although there is limited information on the latest class of medications for the treatment of T2DM, the sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, these drugs do not seem to increase fracture risk. Because diabetes is an increasingly common chronic condition that can affect patients for many decades, further research into the effects of agents for the treatment of T2DM on bone metabolism is warranted. In this review, the physiological mechanism Continue reading >>

Biological Relationship Between Diabetes And Osteopenia/osteoporosis

Biological Relationship Between Diabetes And Osteopenia/osteoporosis

Biological relationship between diabetes and osteopenia/osteoporosis So, during my surgery last month to take out a cervical disc, my neurosurgeon remarked that he noticed I had poor bone density. Once the neck brace comes off, my endo wants me to get a bone density test. I'm already on a Vitamin D3 supplement. I've tried to do some research and found that poor bone density and bone issues in general are something diabetics need to watch out for. So, I'm wondering, how does diabetes cause one to be predisposed to osteopenia and/or osteoporosis?Is there something about fluctuating blood glucose levels that affects the osteoblasts? Is insulin a doorkeeper for osteoblasts or something? I'm curious what the biological relationship is between diabetes osteopenia/osteoporosis. Just guessing... would charcot foot be perhaps the most extreme case, and that even though most of us won't expect charcot foot, that osteo and bone problems may exist to a lesser degree in most of us? Whether my guess is related to vitamin D levels or not, I don't know. Just a guess. Warning: googling for pictures of charcot foot is pretty scary stuff but not too different than what my "diabetes education" of 30+ year ago consisted of. I'm interested in this as well. I wonder if it is a mechanism related to osteoclasts too (blasts build bone and clasts destroy bone...perhaps some sort of insulin/vitamin D item does not inhibit the clasts well enough and they eat away too much bone through their activity?). Hopefully one of the science wizards around here will help us out :) Good point, Bradford. I didn't factor in that the problem might be with the osteoclasts. I wonder what link there may be between thyroid issues (which we diabetics are predisposed to as well) and bone issues. Except Charcot is caus Continue reading >>

Alleviating Effects Of Morin Against Experimentally-induced Diabetic Osteopenia

Alleviating Effects Of Morin Against Experimentally-induced Diabetic Osteopenia

Abuohashish et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2013 Plant flavonoids are emerging as potent therapeutic drugs effective against a wide range of aging diseases particularly bone metabolic disorders. Morin (3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone), a member of flavonols, is an important bioactive compound by interacting with nucleic acids, enzymes and protein. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of morin on diabetic osteopenia in rats. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic model was used by considering 300 mg/dl fasting glucose level as diabetic. Morin (15 and 30 mg/kg) was treated for five consecutive weeks to diabetic rats. Serum levels of glucose, insulin, deoxypyridinoline cross links (DPD), osteocalcin (OC), bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were estimated. Femoral bones were taken for micro CT scan to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and other morphometric parameters. Significant bone loss was documented as the level of bone turnover parameters including DPD, OC, BALP and CTX were increased in serum of diabetic rats. Morin treatment significantly attenuated these elevated levels. Bone micro-CT scan of diabetic rats showed a significant impairment in trabecular bone microarchitecture, density and other morphometric parameters. These impairments were significantly ameliorated by morin administration. Serum levels of glucose, TBARS, IL-1, IL-6 and TNF- were significantly elevated, while the level of insulin and GSH was decreased in diabetic rats. These serum changes in diabetic rats were bring back to normal values a Continue reading >>

Does Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Affect Bone Quality In Prepubertal Children? - Sciencedirect

Does Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Affect Bone Quality In Prepubertal Children? - Sciencedirect

Volume 10, Issue 3 , September 2015, Pages 300-305 Does type 1 diabetes mellitus affect bone quality in prepubertal children? Author links open overlay panel Khalid I.KhoshhalABOSa Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in children often starts before the achievement of peak bone mass. This may constitute a landmark in predicting bone fracture risk later in their lives. This study aims to determine the serum levels of bone markers in children with T1DM in combination with their bone mineral density (BMD). Children diagnosed with T1DM for 3 years or more without signs of puberty were included in the diabetic group. Another group of age-matched healthy non-diabetic controls was recruited from a local school. The serum levels of a group of biochemical markers for bone formation and resorption were determined in both study groups, and BMD was measured by ultrasound absorptiometry. Thirty six children with T1DM and 39 normal children were included in this study. The results showed that 24/36 (66.7%) diabetic children had a Z score below zero. Of these, five scored below1. In contrast, 12/39 (30.8%) children from the control group had a Z score below zero, but none had a score below1. Significantly lower levels of osteocalcin and procollagen N-terminal peptide were detected in the diabetic group. The serum levels of bone resorption markers were significantly higher in the diabetic group. T1DM decreases BMD and some bone formation and increases some bone resorption biomarkers. BMD and bone markers are useful diagnostic tools for the early detection of alterations in the bone quality of children with T1DM. This, if treated in a timely manner, may decrease future bone fracture susceptibility. Continue reading >>

Osteopenia Associated With Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus: What Are The Causes?

Osteopenia Associated With Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus: What Are The Causes?

Volume 23, Issue 1 , February 1994, Pages 43-54 Osteopenia associated with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: what are the causes? Author links open overlay panel F.Gregorio Get rights and content This study investigated whether alterations in bone mineral content (BMC) and/or in the phosphate-calcium metabolism exist in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM); whether they are linked to glycaemic control and whether antidiabetic therapy oral agents or insulin influences BMC and mineral metabolism. A cross-section assessment compared BMC and mineral metabolism in 60 well-controlled and 50 poorly controlled diabetic patients under oral hypoglycaemic therapy with 50 healthy controls. A longitudinal assessment improved the high glucose levels of the poorly controlled diabetic group either by increasing oral treatment or by adding a bedtime NPH insulin. Glycaemic control, BMC and mineral metabolism were followed-up for 1 year. In NIDDM patients BMC is reduced. This reduction is more marked in poorly controlled diabetic patients. In well-controlled diabetes osteocalcin levels are low. In poorly controlled patients glycosuria, hypercalcuria and parathyroid hyperactivity are present. In both groups vitamins 25(OH)-D, 1,25(OH)2-D and calcitonin levels are normal. Improving metabolic control increased BMC, normalized urinary calcium excretion and parathyroid activity and reduced osteocalcin levels. The type of anti-diabetic therapy does not have any significant effect upon BMC or upon phosphate-calcium metabolism. In conclusion, in NIDDM a hard-to-define osteoblast deficit appears to exist. In poorly controlled diabetes the loss of BMC is aggravated by the negative calcium balance caused by the renal calcium leak. This is due to glucosuric-induced osmotic diuresis Continue reading >>

Osteoporosis And Diabetes

Osteoporosis And Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes are most susceptible to osteoporosis People with type 1 diabetes tend to have a lower bone density and hence at an increased risk of osteoporosis, a condition resulting in weakened bones. Osteoporosis is believed to affect around 3 million people in the UK. Our bones weaken as we get older but some factors can speed up the loss of bone density. Osteoporosis may not present noticeable symptoms and the first indication that you may have osteoporosis is usually if you suffer a bone fracture. Osteoporosis may be noticeable in older as weak and fractured bones in the spine can cause the head to permanently lean forwards and a hunchback appearance developing. Common bone fractures resulting from osteoporosis include: Osteoporosis can be diagnosed using a DEXA scan, which measures your bone mineral density (BMD). DEXA stands for dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. There are three different different grades of bone density, normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Osteopenia is where you have lower than normal bone density but a higher bone density, and therefore lower risk of fractures, than osteoporosis. Our bones generally become weaker as we get older but a number of factors can speed up the weakening of bones and include: Being bed bound or otherwise getting very little physical activity Overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) Higher rates of osteoporosis have been noted in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes have been found to have, on average, lower bone mineral density. Researchers are yet to fully understand the mechanism to explain why people with type 1 diabetes have a lower bone density but one hypothesis is that insulin may play a part as our bones are known to play a part in the regulation of blood sugar levels. Read Continue reading >>

Osteopenia: A Bone Disorder Associated With Diabetes Mellitus.

Osteopenia: A Bone Disorder Associated With Diabetes Mellitus.

Osteopenia: a bone disorder associated with diabetes mellitus. Departamento de Anlises Clnicas e Toxicolgicas, Centro de Cincias da Sade, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59010-180 Natal, RN, Brazil. Although osteopenia has been associated with human diabetes mellitus, the pathogenesis of diabetic osteopenia is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of diabetes on histomorphometry, bone mineral density (BMD)-measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-and biomarkers of bone metabolism in rats up to 120 days after the onset of experimental diabetes. Female Wistar rats with a regular estrous cycle were randomly divided into two groups: control rats (n = 15) and diabetic rats without insulin treatment (n = 25). Diabetes was induced by injection of alloxan and was confirmed by the determination of blood glucose concentration (>250 mg/dl). The results revealed an approximate threefold increase of femoral trabecular distance in diabetic rats compared to controls. Conversely, trabecular thickness and bone trabecular volume were reduced twofold and 77%, respectively. BMD in both the metadiaphyseal region and total area of the femur was found to be clearly reduced in diabetic animals, with no significant differences between the groups. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and tartarate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activities showed significant six- and twofold increases, respectively, in diabetic rats. There were significant decreases in serum calcium and albumin concentrations in diabetic rats, but no difference was observed in serum magnesium, phosphorus, or creatinine concentrations between the groups. Overall, our findings support the conclusion that the diabetic state is associated with alterations in bone turnover, resulting in the deve Continue reading >>

Boniva And Osteopenia | Diabetic Connect

Boniva And Osteopenia | Diabetic Connect

Ok, I just got the word back on the bone density study. Apparently I have osteopenia. Damn. I was so sure it would come back negative. The note from the Dr says they can either treat with Boniva or continue with vitamins etc. I'm not sure what I should do. My calcium levels have always come back in the normal range and I've already been taking vitamins for a long time. Boniva has a warning against using with severe kidney disease. I would not say my kidney disease is in the severe range, but it might be worth a call to the nephrologist. Has anyone here used Boniva? What is your experience with it? I'm not liking what I read about side effects, but I've been taking vitamin D and B and a multivitamin. I'm exercising. My calcium levels are normal. I still have osteopenia. I'm also not liking what I read about osteopenia. So I'm going to try Fosamax. It will be a once a week dose. I've done well with Bydureon and Victoza, so I'm going to be optimistic about it, that my body can tolerate it. If the side effects are too much, I'll drop it. I don't like the eventuality if I don't try. Good luck. I do know people taking fosamax OK and I know many that had major problems from it. Be careful you don't fall a fracture your femur. Be sure your dentist is aware you are taking it. I got the perscription filled at one point and then threw it in the garbage. Astronauts suffer from bone loss when in weightless conditions for long duration. NASA has come up with vibration plate machines that seem to prevent bone loss and may actually increase density. The machines on the market are pretty expensive. It might be worth it. Like Dayfly wrote the drugs have real problems. It seems a poor trade off to decrease bone loss but making the femur and jaw bones more brittle. I have bought one of th Continue reading >>

Osteopenia | Diabetes And Endocrinology Institute Of Tampa

Osteopenia | Diabetes And Endocrinology Institute Of Tampa

Not to be confused with osteoporosis, osteopenia is a term that indicates the patient has a bone mineral density somewhat lower than that of a typical young adult who is at their peak in terms of acquired bone mass. Importantly, osteopenia refers only to patients who are within 1.0-2.49 standard deviations (a relatively small amount) from what would be considered normal for a young person of the same gender, and does not necessarily mean that the patient is actively losing bone mass. Rather, an osteopenia diagnosis is an indicator that your physician should monitor you for further bone loss that could lead to osteoporosis particularly when certain endocrine disorders that can impact bones are present, such as hyperparathyroidism or malabsorption syndrome . The physicians at Diabetes and Endocrine Institute of Tampa proactively address endocrine disorders that can affect bone mass to help patients avoid or minimize fractures tied to osteoporosis. Contact us at 813.615.7620 or fill out an appointment request form if you have concerns about potential bone loss tied to an endocrine disorder. Family history of osteoporosis or osteopenia Hormone changes including menopause and low testosterone Women aged 65 and up are most susceptible Underlying medical condition that causes inflammation DXA or pDXA scan (bone mineral density test) Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Osteoporosis

Link Between Diabetes And Osteoporosis

Stephen Schneider, MD; Sue A Shapses, PhD What is the link between diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) and bone mineral density/osteoporosis in postmenopausal women? Response from Stephen Schneider, MD and Sue A Shapses, PhD Adult women with type 1 diabetes have relatively decreased bone mass, increased fracture risk, and delayed fracture healing compared with healthy women without diabetes. In addition, researchers have show that the biomechanical integrity of diabetic bone may be impaired.[ 1 ] However, patients with type 2 diabetes usually do not have a decreased bone mass and, in fact, may be relatively protected from osteoporosis. Early onset of diabetes, in particular, is associated with reduced bone density, and patients with type 1 diabetes show evidence of low bone mass following adolescence.[ 2 ] This finding may explain the higher incidence of hip fracture reported for postmenopausal women with type 1 diabetes. The osteopenia associated with diabetes appears to be associated with a decreased bone turnover associated with impaired osteoblastic maturation and function. This is reflected in a decrease in serum markers of bone formation, such as osteocalcin. Bone resorption and formation are usually tightly coupled, but this has not been well studied in patients with diabetes. The few available studies suggest that the rate of bone resorption in diabetes is normal and therefore elevated relative to the decreased rate of bone formation. Evidence that there are significant alterations in serum parathyroid hormone levels or function is lacking. Boullion and colleagues[ 3 ] showed reduced serum levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), osteocalcin, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, but not all markers were reduced in adu Continue reading >>

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