diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Oral Health An Overview

Diabetes And Gum Disease

Diabetes And Gum Disease

Overview Dental disease is infectious. It can be transmitted through the sharing of utensils, toothbrushes and anything else that permits the exchange of saliva. There is no “vaccine” for preventing dental disease. Dental disease prevention requires active involvement of both the patient and a dentist. It includes regular examinations (with X-rays), diagnosis and treatment planning by a dentist, fluoride applications as needed, dental sealants and restorative treatment. Patient education, healthy dietary habits and daily oral hygiene practices are also important. TOP What is periodontal disease? Severe periodontal (gum) disease often leads to tooth loss, but recent scientific research suggests a link to a variety of common, non-oral health conditions, including heart disease. Our teeth are covered with a sticky film of bacteria called plaque. Brushing after meals and snacks and flossing between teeth daily helps remove plaque. Plaque that is not removed may harden into calculus. When calculus accumulates either above or below the gumline, the gum tissue becomes irritated and inflamed. The early stage of periodontal (gum) disease is called gingivitis. Symptoms of periodontal disease include: Persistent bad breath Gums that bleed when teeth are brushed Red, swollen and tender gums Gums that have pulled away from the teeth Loose or separating teeth Pus between the gum and tooth A change in one’s bite Periodontal diseases are serious bacterial infections that destroy the attachment fibers and supporting bone that hold your teeth in your mouth. When this happens, gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets that fill with plaque and even more infection. The more advanced the disease, the deeper the pockets. Diabetes and gum disease While severe periodontal disease oft Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

People with diabetes have a higher risk of tooth and gum problems. It is important to look after your oral health and control your blood glucose levels to prevent gum disease. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Quit smoking. On this page: People with diabetes who have irregular blood glucose levels have a higher risk of tooth problems and gum disease than people without diabetes. This is because they have lowered resistance to infection and may not heal as easily. If you are living with diabetes, you need to pay particular attention to your oral health and dental care, as well as controlling your blood glucose levels. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Diabetes is a common disease among Australians, affecting almost 1.5 million people (around 7.6 per cent of the population). The first signs and symptoms of diabetes can occur in the mouth, so paying attention to your oral health can also lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. The most common oral health problems affecting people with diabetes are: periodontal (gum) disease gum abscesses tooth decay fungal infections such as thrush lichen planus (an inflammatory, autoimmune skin condition) mouth ulcers taste disturbances a dry, burning mouth (low saliva levels). Diabetes and periodontal (gum) disease Periodontal (gum) disease is caused by an infection that destroys the bone surrounding and supporting your teeth. This bone holds your teeth into your jawbone and allows you to chew comfortably. Bacteria and food debris called dental plaque is essential for gum disease. If left on teeth and gums, plaque hardens to form calculus or tartar. The plaque and calculus irritate the gums around teeth so they become red, swollen a Continue reading >>

Oral Health | Healthy People 2020

Oral Health | Healthy People 2020

Lack of access to dental care for all ages remains a public health challenge. This issue was highlighted in a 2008 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report that described difficulties in accessing dental care for low-income children. 7 In 2013, GAO reported an increase in dental services among children who were Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries, but children still visited the dentist less often than privately insured children. 8 Potential strategies to improve access to dental services and improve oral health of children and adults include: Implementing and evaluating activities that have an impact on health behavior Promoting interventions to reduce tooth decay, such as dental sealants and fluoride use Evaluating and improving methods of monitoring oral diseases and conditions Increasing the capacity of State dental health programs to provide preventive oral health services Increasing the number of community health centers with an oral health component 1 US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. Oral health in America: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000, p. 33-59. 2 US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. Oral health in America: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; 2000, p. 155-88. 3 US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A national call to action to promote oral health, Rockville (MD): National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; May 2003, p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health- An Overview Of Clinical Cases | B. | International Journal Of Medical And Dental Sciences

Diabetes And Oral Health- An Overview Of Clinical Cases | B. | International Journal Of Medical And Dental Sciences

International Journal of Medical and Dental Sciences Sathyabama University, Dental College and Hospital, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology, Chennai, Ireland Tamil Nadu Government Dental College & Hospital, Department of Prosthodontics, Chennai Sree Balaji Dental College & Hospital, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Chennai Sathyabama University, Dental College and Hospital, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology, Chennai Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease prevalent worldwide with an increasing frequency of occurrence. Diabetes produces a wide array of symptoms throughout the body. It is said that mouth is the mirror of systemic health. The effects of diabetes are most frequently reflected in the oral cavity. Gingivitis and periodontitis are most frequently associated with diabetes. Periodontitis has been reported as sixth complication of diabetes and they both exhibit a bidirectional interrelationship. This article reviews about the oral lesions occurring in diabetes and their pathogenesis. This article also focuses on the interrelationship between diabetes and oral health stressing the need for oral health assessment and treatment as part of preventive medical therapy for diabetes. Diabetes, Oral Health, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Taste Dysfunction. Cotran RS, Kumar V, Collins T. Robbins pathologic basis of disease. Philadelphia: Elsevier; 2003.p.913-29. Wild S, Roglic G, Green A, Sicree R, King H. Global prevalence of diabetes: estimates for the year 2000 and projections for 2030. Diabetes Care 2004; 27: 1047-53. Ship JA. Diabetes and oral health: an overview. J Am Dent Assoc 2003;134:4S10S. Lin BP, Taylor GW, Allen DJ, Ship JA. Dental caries in older adults with diabetes mellitus. Spec Care Dent 1999;19(1):8-14. Chavez EM, Borrell LN, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Other Endocrine Disorders

Diabetes & Other Endocrine Disorders

In the U.S., 5% of people have Type 1 diabetes, which starts in children and young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin, which converts sugar, starches and food into energy. Type 2 diabetes is the more common type of diabetes in the U.S., with 29.1 million people (9.3%) who have this disease. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin and the body has higher than normal blood glucose levels. Men are at a higher risk of developing diabetes than women. American Diabetes Month Diabetes Can Affect Your Oral Health Diabetes Can be Identified in Dental Office Diabetes: What You Need to Know Glucose, Diabetes and Oral Health Good Oral Hygiene Essential for Diabetics Diabetes Prevent Diabetes Problems, Keep Your Teeth and Gums Healthy Continue reading >>

Incorporating Oral Health As Part Of Routine Diabetes Care In Ireland

Incorporating Oral Health As Part Of Routine Diabetes Care In Ireland

Incorporating Oral Health as Part of Routine Diabetes Care in Ireland J Ahern 1,3,4, OP Hamnvik 2, J Barrow 3, J Nunn 4 1 Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, St. Jamess Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland 2 Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA 3 Initiative for Integration of Oral Health and Medicine, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA 4 School of Dental Science, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland Diabetes mellitus is a common disorder of glucose metabolism that is increasingly prevalent in the Irish population. It is associated with a range of complications leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. A less well-recognized complication of diabetes is periodontal disease. This is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the periodontium, the specialized group of tissues that surround and support the teeth, including the gingiva (gums) and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease affects patients with diabetes with a greater prevalence and incidence than non-diabetic patients, and can itself exert negative effects on glucose control in people with diabetes. The National Clinical Programme for Diabetes in Ireland aims to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes, which includes the development and dissemination of guidelines supporting integrated care. Based on the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease, we recommend that an oral health evaluation, as well as any necessary onward referral, be incorporated into the Irish recommendations for routine diabetes care, as part of the National Clinical Programme. The presence of a bidirectional relationship between oral and systemic health has been well described, highlighting a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Oral Health Radhika T, Kannan R - J Orofac Sci

Diabetes Mellitus And Oral Health Radhika T, Kannan R - J Orofac Sci

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by abnormal secretion and metabolic action of insulin. Hyperglycemia, the key feature of this endocrine disorder causes multisystem damage leading to untoward effects in various tissues collectively referred to as "Diabetic complications". Diabetes alters the oral health to a great extent. Indeed, periodontitis has been reported as the sixth complication of this disease. This article gives an overview of the oral effects of diabetes with an emphasis on periodontal disease and its relationship with cardiovascular disorders and pre-term birth. Dental considerations for management of these patients and recent advances in the dental field with respect to diabetes are also highlighted. Keywords:Diabetes, oral, periodontal, dental Radhika T, Kannan R. Diabetes mellitus and oral health. J Orofac Sci 2012;4:7-10 Radhika T, Kannan R. Diabetes mellitus and oral health. J Orofac Sci [serial online] 2012 [cited2018 Apr 22];4:7-10. Available from: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multisystemic metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism. The cardinal biochemical feature of this disease is hyperglycemia, resulting from either a defect in insulin secretion from the pancreas, a change in insulin action, or both. Chronic hyperglycemia results in widespread multisystem damage, collectively referred to as, 'Diabetic complications,' which include retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, macrovasular disease, and delayed wound healing. Diabetes is a looming health issue, constituting a huge global public health burden that is predicted to afflict300 million people globally by 2025, and at least 366 million people by 2030. [1] Diabetes mellitus alters the cellular microenvironment in multi Continue reading >>

- Hmsa Dental

- Hmsa Dental

Patients with type 2 diabetes are three times as likely to develop periodontal disease as compared to a non-diabetic. Periodontal (gum) disease is often considered the sixth complication of diabetes. Those people who don't have their diabetes under control are especially at risk. The role of oral health in diabetes is a two way street. Patients with uncontrolled periodontal disease have a hard time managing their diabetes. However, the control of periodontal disease can improve the management of diabetes. Why do I need to see my dentist if I have diabetes? Severe periodontal disease can increase blood sugar, contributing to increased periods of time when the body functions with a high blood sugar. This puts diabetics at increased risk for diabetic complications. Thus, diabetics who have periodontal disease should be treated to eliminate the periodontal infection. Between 1997-2007 the prevalence of self-reported adult diabetes has steadily increased from 5% to 7.7% (below is the relative growth rate projected out to 2015). In 9 out of 10 cases, Type 2 diabetes is preventable, manageable and controllable with healthier lifestyle habits such as eating better and maintaining good oral health. The total cost estimates of diabetes for the Hawaii population includes excess medical costs of $764 million. Associated costs include absenteeism, reduced productivity and lost productive capacity valued at almost $274 million. In 2010 the total cost of diabetes was estimated to be over 1 billion dollars, the projections for 2015 is estimated to be over 1.1 billion dollars Continue reading >>

Oral Health Overview

Oral Health Overview

Joe D. Arbutante, D.D.S. Family and Cosmetic Dentistry What does the phrase oral health mean to you? No new cavities at your dental checkup? That's certainly part of it. But it's really so much more than a lack of tooth decay. Good oral health means a mouth that's free of disease which can range all the way from mild gingivitis (gum inflammation) to oral cancer; a bite that functions well enough for you to eat without pain and get ample nutrition; and a smile that lets you express your happiest emotions with confidence. Simply put, oral health is a crucial component of your overall health and well-being. It's important to realize that small and readily treatable problems in your mouth can become more complicated, painful and expensive if neglected for too long. Some of these oral health conditions may even have ramifications throughout the whole body. Gingivitis, for example, can sometimes progress to periodontitis a more serious form of gum disease that can loosen teeth and cause them to fall out. Missing teeth can lead to bone loss in the jaw and inadequate nutrition. And numerous studies have shown that people with severe gum disease may be at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The moral of this story: Routine maintenance can pay off big. One of the most important things you can do to safeguard your oral health is to maintain a daily oral hygiene routine that effectively removes plaque from your teeth. It's the bacteria that thrive in the plaque biofilm that cause so many oral health problems. Effective oral hygiene involves brushing your teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste and flossing at least once per day to remove plaque from between the teeth. Nutrition and lifestyle choices also play an important role. You don't have any control ove Continue reading >>

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body — your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart, and other important systems in the body. It can also affect your mouth. People with diabetes face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems. Why are people with diabetes more likely to develop oral health problems? The link between diabetes and oral health problems is high blood sugar. If blood sugar is poorly controlled, oral health problems are more likely to develop. This is because uncontrolled diabetes weakens white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth. Just as studies have shown that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of major organ complications of diabetes — such as eye, heart, and nerve damage — so to can diabetes control protect against the development of oral health problems. Specifically, what are some of these oral health problems? Dry mouth: Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontitis: Besides weakening white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken. This slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events, the body loses its ability to fight infections. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, people with uncontrolled diabetes might experience more frequent and more severe gum disease. Poor healing of oral tissues: People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be damaged. Thrush: People with diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes is a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect the body's ability to process sugar. If you have diabetes, it is particularly important to maintain excellent oral health. That's because diabetics are more prone to oral infections such as periodontal (gum) disease, which can result in tooth loss if left untreated. Conversely, the presence of gum disease can make it harder for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar levels. Periodontal disease is a chronic ailment that is also associated with an elevated level of systemic (whole-body) inflammation. Like diabetes, it may have wide-ranging consequences outside the mouth — possibly increasing a person's chance of experiencing major cardiovascular events (such as heart attack or stroke) or adverse pregnancy outcomes (low birth weight and pre-term delivery). So perhaps it's not surprising that a growing body of evidence suggests the two diseases are related. Two Diseases With Similarities It has long been recognized that having diabetes is a risk factor likely to increase the severity of periodontal disease. That's because diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection, making diabetics more susceptible to both bacterial and fungal infections. Likewise, evidence shows that having serious gum disease (periodontitis) is likely to result in worsening blood glucose control in diabetics; it can also increase the risk of diabetic complications. So, what's the connection? While no one is sure at present, the two diseases seem to share some common pathways and disease-causing mechanisms. Both are associated with the process of inflammation and the immune response. Inflammation itself — often signaled by pain, heat and redness — is evidence of the body's immune system at work, attempting to fight d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus & Oral Health

Diabetes Mellitus & Oral Health

Good oral health can result in better outcomes for diabetics. As you know, treating periodontal infections can help a patient improve their glycemic control. A dentist can literally be the catalyst in the prevention, early detection and treatment of diabetes and other potentially debilitating conditions. There are three general categories of diabetes: a) Type 1, which is the result of an absolute insulin deficiency in the body; b) Type 2, which is caused by an insulin secretory defect and insulin resistance; and c) gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy and is due to abnormal glucose tolerance.1 There are approximately 18.2 million people in the United States who have diabetes; 13 million have been diagnosed, while 5.2 million are unaware that they have this disease. Each year an additional 1 million adults in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes.2 Some of the more serious medical conditions associated with untreated or inadequately managed diabetes include nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary heart disease.3,4 The oral health complications of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus can include caries, periapical abscesses, loss of teeth, impaired ability to wear dental prostheses (due to salivary gland dysfunction), lichen planus, as well as the following conditions5: Gingivitis and periodontal disease: Evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing gingivitis, which when there is poor glycemic control, may progress to advanced periodontal disease. In addition, data also suggests that periodontal infection can adversely affect glycemic control in people with diabetes.6 Therefore, it is important that people with periodontal disease and who have diabetes receive regular dental treat Continue reading >>

More in diabetes