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Diabetes And Nutrition Cdc

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Nutrition Activists Go After American Diabetes Association, Cdc And Everyone Else

Nutrition Activists Go After American Diabetes Association, Cdc And Everyone Else

Nutrition Activists Go After American Diabetes Association, CDC And Everyone Else Is the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the take from Big Soda? Dr. Tom Frieden will be surprised to hear that their $7 billion budget is moved by a tiny marketing sponsorship at some events. As would the American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association,Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), and we here at the American Council on Science and Health. But that is the inference made by a'follow the money' conspiracy correlation brought about by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine . All of those groups are advocates for public health and all, including some 90 others, received occasional funding from a large soda company in the past. And they are implicated in the American obesity epidemic. It's obviously a good time to jump on soda companies. Coca-Cola funded a perfectly sensible group at the University of Colorado School of Medicine (who noted accurately for decades prior that if you burn as many calories as you take in you won't gain weight) and not only apologized for it, they have basically apologized for being in the soda business at all. The researchers returned the money even though they had said nothing different for decades. Then we got another conspiracy story in JAMA , this time alleging that one paper in the 1960s somehowabsolved sugar of any health guilt and pointed the finger at fat, whichswayed both policy makers and the public- and the scientists behind it got agrant for a measly $6,500.(1) Running a non-profit is very difficult. Everyone is competing for a finite pool of money and it would be great if there were enough foundations to support us all, but there just aren't. Most of our donors are individuals but we will surely take a c Continue reading >>

Cdc Recognizes Digital Health Platforms For Diabetes Prevention

Cdc Recognizes Digital Health Platforms For Diabetes Prevention

A.D.A.M. CDC Recognizes Digital Health Platforms for Diabetes Prevention CDC Recognizes Digital Health Platforms for Diabetes Prevention December 16, 2016 A.D.A.M. , Health & Wellness In the 21st century, people are increasingly familiar and comfortable with online communities and communicating via the internet. Now there is evidence a chronic health condition type 2 diabetes may be prevented with help from digital health platforms using virtual coaching and monitoring. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diabetes in the US has reached epidemic proportions. Over 29 million Americans have the disease and the majority has type 2 diabetes. Previously called adult-onset diabetes, this form is associated with being overweight and sedentary and health experts say the condition can often be avoided with lifestyle changes. Successfully preventing many cases of type 2 diabetes would have enormous consequences, both for individuals and for the economy. The American Diabetes Association reports that the total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes is $245 billion, including $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in reduced productivity. The CDC is making type 2 diabetes prevention a high priority and promoting the National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). The aim is to identify people who have pre-diabetes and help them avoid becoming diabetic by adopting changes in their diets and activity levels. Pre-diabetes is characterized by a blood glucose level higher than normal and typically develops in people who are overweight. The DPP incorporates the use of science-backed programs to reduce the diabetes risk factors associated with pre-diabetes. One goal of the program, for example, is to help the obese and overweight lose 5% 7%of their w Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Healthy People 2020

Diabetes | Healthy People 2020

National snapshots provide a visual display of progress for selected objectives in each Healthy People 2020 Topic Area, whenever data are available. The snapshot heading describes the snapshot theme, the population to which the snapshot applies (when needed for clarification), and the data year(s). The snapshot heading is not meant to capture the full scientific scope of the objective(s) that is (are) displayed. The user can find complete technical information about the objective(s) in the Data Details. The snapshot visual display is generally one of three types: a line graph, a bar chart, or a map. The snapshot notes and footnotes indicate any technical information about the data that the user needs to correctly interpret the visual display, together with any key data limitations (when applicable). Although the snapshots are intended to be standalone, the user should consult the objective(s) Data Details for the full range of methodology issues that may impact interpretation. The snapshot source(s) indicate the data source(s) used to create the visual display. Age-adjusted data are adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Education and income are the primary measures of socioeconomic status in Healthy People 2020. Unless otherwise noted, income is defined as a familys income before taxes; thus, the terms income and family income are used interchangeably in the snapshots. To facilitate comparisons among groups and over time, while adjusting for family size and for inflation, Healthy People 2020 categorizes family income using the Poverty Threshold (PT), sometimes also referred to as the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), developed by the Census Bureau. Unless otherwise overridden by considerations specific to the data system, the five categories of family income pri Continue reading >>

Cdc Reports New Cases Of Diabetes Declining In The U.s.

Cdc Reports New Cases Of Diabetes Declining In The U.s.

With commentary by Frank Hu, MD, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Diabetes is on the decline in the U.S., after many years of steady increases, according to a new report issued Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 2009 to 2014, the number of new cases declined significantly, from 1.7 million to about 1.4 million, according to the latest statistics. This new decline follows decades of increases in diabetes among U.S. adults, driven by the obesity epidemic and a lack of physical activity. In 1980, 493,000 adult in the U.S. had diabetes, according to the CDC. By 2014, that number had grown to 1.4 million. A closer look at the years 2009 to 2014, however, show that cases declined from 1.7 million in 2009 to 1.4 million in 2014, a 20% drop. Diabetes on the decline: perspective "It's encouraging news," says Frank Hu, MD, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, who reviewed the report. "The prevalence of diabetes has been increasing steadily in the past two decades," Dr. Hu says. "In the past few years, the prevalence has plateaued. This year, the 2014 data show there is actually a substantial decline in the number of people diagnosed with diabetes. It looks like this trend is pretty robust and not artificial due to statistical variability." However, he adds, "It's too early to celebrate." That is because ''the number of people with diabetes is still unacceptably high in the U.S. One of 10 American adults has diabetes. In total, we have 24 million diagnosed with diabetes and another 5 million undiagnosed." Most people, about 95%, have type 2 diabetes. The body cannot make enough insulin to control blood sugar or does not use Continue reading >>

Cooking With Diabetes: Building A Better Diet

Cooking With Diabetes: Building A Better Diet

As a diabetic, you’re constantly aware of your blood sugar levels and the food choices you make. Meal planning and eating well can be challenging, especially if you’re not familiar with what healthy choices are best for diabetes patients. David Trachtenbarg, M.D., UnityPoint Health physician and chair of the Diabetes Steering Committee, discusses what foods you should be adding, and subtracting, from your shopping cart. Carbs and Sugars In general, food has three main components – fat, protein and carbohydrates. A well-balanced diet usually contains some of each of these, but diabetes patients need to be especially mindful of how many carbs they’re consuming. “Carbohydrates affect diabetes the most because they are converted by the body into glucose (sugar),” Dr. Trachtenbarg says. “With diabetes, you want to control the number of carbohydrates you eat. For most patients with diabetes, this is between 60-80 grams of carbohydrate per meal.” How quickly the body absorbs sugar is important, too. For diabetics, slower absorbing foods, or foods with a lower glycemic index, help prevent blood sugar spikes. “Table sugar (sucrose) has a high glycemic index because it raises the sugar more quickly and higher than carbohydrates foods with a low glycemic index, such as green leafy vegetables,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says. Best and Worst Foods So, how do you easily compare foods by the level of carbs, sugars and overall glycemic index? Dr. Trachtenbarg offers this simplified list as a general guide (1 = best, 5 = worst). Foods for Diabetes – Best to Worst Green, leafy vegetables (lettuce, spinach, etc.) Whole fruits (apples, oranges) Whole grains (whole wheat bread) White flour and starch vegetables (potatoes) Foods with sugar (soda) “Green leafy vegetables, like Continue reading >>

Are You Familiar With The Cdcs Diabetes Prevention Program?

Are You Familiar With The Cdcs Diabetes Prevention Program?

Home Blogs Stone Soup Are You Familiar with the CDCs Diabetes Prevention Program? Are You Familiar with the CDCs Diabetes Prevention Program? The most recent numbers indicate that one in every three adults has prediabetes, but only 10 percent know they have it! Those who do know can enroll in the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Diabetes Prevention Program , or DPP. Its a year-long lifestyle change program designed to help individuals with prediabetes reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. It also is an immense opportunity for food and nutrition professionals to serve this population. The DPP was based off extensive, NIH-led research which showed that a structured lifestyle change program for individuals with prediabetes can reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. And that statistic increased to 71 percent for individuals over 60 years old! How does the DPP do it? In the program, participants interact in a group setting to work toward 150 minutes of physical activity each week and achieving a modest 5 to 7-percent weight loss. The material is structured to educate and encourage participants to eat healthier, reduce stress, problem solve, overcome obstacles and maintain their motivation. After all, a year is big commitment for most, but also is ideal to stimulate long-term success. My role as their lifestyle coach (not their dietitian) is to lead each lesson, facilitate conversation among group members and tailor materials to best fit the groups needs. Before becoming a lifestyle coach, I had only been immersed in the setting of one-on-one nutrition counseling, so working on behavior change in a small group setting was a new and welcomed change in my career. I found that DPP group members looked to each other for insight and i Continue reading >>

Managing Your Diabetes

Managing Your Diabetes

On this page: About Diabetes What is Diabetes? Your body changes much of the food you eat to a kind of sugar called glucose. Glucose is the major source of energy for your body. Your body makes insulin to help change the glucose into energy. Diabetes is a disease that can stop your body from making insulin or prevent it from using insulin properly. When you have diabetes, your body can’t change glucose into energy. Some parts of your body can’t get enough glucose for energy. If your diabetes is not managed well, high blood sugar can result. Parts of the body can be harmed when too much glucose is in the blood. Diabetes is a serious disease. When the body is exposed to high blood sugar over a long period of time there can be severe damage to blood vessels and nerves. If diabetes is uncontrolled, people have a higher risk of getting heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and loss of feeling in their feet and legs. How do you know if you are at risk of having diabetes? Take the Risk Quiz (pdf*)to learn more. Types of Diabetes? Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes results from the body’s failure to produce insulin, the hormone that “unlocks” the cells of the body, allowing glucose to enter to produce energy. People with type 1 diabetes cannot make any insulin and must take insulin shots as well as engage in daily physical activity and healthy eating. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs before the age of 30. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes results from insulin resistance (a condition in which the body fails to properly use insulin) combined with, in some cases, a lack of ability to produce insulin. People with type 2 diabetes use daily physical activity and healthy eating to manage their diabe Continue reading >>

Cdcs Diabetes Prevention Program Questions And Answers #3

Cdcs Diabetes Prevention Program Questions And Answers #3

Q. Will Medicare pay for the program participants that are in the pending recognition status? A.Pending recognition status is the initial application process for CDC diabetes prevention program recognition (DPRP) for the NDPP. A program with pending recognition is not eligible for Medicare payments. Medicare will be requiring organizations to have Full CDC Diabetes Prevention Program Recognition to enroll as Medicare Suppliers. CMS is considering another category of recognition which would be addressed in future rule-making. Q. It was mentioned that NDPP will only be reimbursed from Medicare for face-to-face groups initially. Would a live, telephone group be considered face-to-face? A.No, telephonic delivery is not considered face-to-face. CMS will not pay for non-face-to-face delivery of the program in 2018. Future rule-making will address virtual delivery and payment. Q. How different is the CDC approved DPP from the American Diabetes Associations Diabetes Self-Management and Education Program? A.The National DPP and Diabetes Self-Management and Education (DSME) program are different programs altogether. The National DPP is intended to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes in populations with prediabetes. DSME programs provide standardized education and training for populations already living with diabetes. DSME programs are recognized by the American Diabetes Association or accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Programs that deliver the National DPP are recognized/accredited by the CDC. DSME programs that also wish to deliver the National DPP must go through the process to become CDC-Recognized (full) and enroll as a Medicare Supplier to deliver the National DPP to Medicare beneficiaries with prediabetes. Q.Does one need to be a certified diab Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes: Cdc

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes: Cdc

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes or Prediabetes: CDC Lifestyle changes can prevent full-blown disease, report says TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than 100 million U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes, health officials say. As of 2015, more than 9 percent of the population -- 30.3 million -- had diabetes. Another 84.1 million had prediabetes, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday. People with prediabetes have elevated blood sugar levels, but not so high that they have full-blown diabetes, which requires medication or insulin injections. With exercise and a healthy diet, prediabetics can halve their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the CDC noted. However, awareness levels remain too low. The new report found that nearly 1 in 4 adults with diabetes didn't even know they had the disease, and less than 12 percent with prediabetes knew they had that condition. If not treated, prediabetes often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years, the CDC said. "More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don't know it," CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said. "Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease," she said in a government news release. According to the report, the rate of new diabetes cases remains steady: 1.5 million new cases were diagnosed among people 18 and older in 2015. Incidence rose with age. Four percent of adults ages 18 to 44 had diagnosed diabetes, compared with 17 percent of people 45 to 64, and one-quarter of folks 65 and older. Dr. Minisha Sood is an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "It is reassuring that the rate of increase in diabetes cases has slowed, but we should not reduce our vigilance whe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program

Diabetes Prevention Program

Prediabetes is a serious condition affecting 1 out of 3 adults. Thats 84 million people! Prevent type 2 diabetes and cut your risk in half with a proven lifestyle change program. This FREE Diabetes Prevention Program runs for a period of 12 months. This 12-month lifestyle modification program offers nutritional guidance, blood glucose screening and support to help prevent or delay diabetes onset. Throughout the program, our licensed dietician-nutritionist will give participants the help and support they need to make and sustain lifestyle changes to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. During the first 6 months of the program, you will meet about once a week. During the second 6 months, youll meet once or twice a month. Staying in the program for the full year is essential to help you stick to new habits and avoid slipping back into old habits.Participants receive tools to help them monitor activity patterns, eating habits and physical activity to assist them in achieving success. Giant uses the PreventT2 curriculum, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Lose 5% or more of your current body weight Gradually increase your physical activity to at least 150 minutes per week Next class starts September 2017! See locations and times below. 1400 7TH STREET NW, WASHINGTON,DC - Wednesdays @ 2:00 PM 601 EAST 33RD STREET, BALTIMORE, MD - Wednesdays @ 1:30 PM 7546 ANNAPOLIS ROAD, LANHAM, MD - Wednesdays @ 7:00 PM 1155 ANNAPOLIS RD, ODENTON, MD - Thursdays @ 6:00 PM 9200 BALT. NAT. PK., ELLICOTT CITY, MD - Tuesdays @ 12 PM & 6 PM 621 EAST GLEBE RD, ALEXANDRIA, VA - Thursdays @ 6:00 PM 1454 CHAIN BRIDGE RD, MCLEAN, VA - Tuesdays @ 6:00 PM 5701 PLANK ROAD, FREDERICKSBURG, VA - Saturdays @ 9:00 AM Continue reading >>

Why Good Nutrition Is Important

Why Good Nutrition Is Important

Unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are leading causes of death in the U.S. Unhealthy diet contributes to approximately 678,000 deaths each year in the U.S., due to nutrition- and obesity-related diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes.1 In the last 30 years, obesity rates have doubled in adults, tripled in children, and quadrupled in adolescents.2, 3, 4 Leading Contributors to Premature Death 20101 Diet 678,000 Tobacco 465,000 High blood pressure 442,700 High body-mass index 364,000 Physical inactivity 234,000 High total cholesterol 158,400 Alcohol and drug use 111,000 Air pollution 110,000 Sexual abuse and violence 9,300 Occupational carcinogens (e.g., asbestos) 5,900 The typical American diet is too high in calories, saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars, and does not have enough fruits, vegetables, whole grains, calcium, and fiber. Such a diet contributes to some of the leading causes of death and increases the risk of numerous diseases5, including: heart disease; diabetes; obesity; high blood pressure; stroke; osteoporosis;6 and cancers, including cervical, colon, gallbladder, kidney, liver, ovarian, uterine, and postmenopausal breast cancers; leukemia; and esophageal cancer (after researchers took smoking into account).7 Leading Causes of Death (2012)7 1. Heart Disease 599,711 2. Cancer 582,623 3. Chronic lower respiratory disease 143,489 4. Cerebrovascular disease (stroke and related conditions) 128,546 5. Unintentional injuries (accidents) 127,792 6. Alzheimer’s disease 83,637 7. Diabetes mellitus 73,932 8. Influenza and pneumonia 50,636 9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (kidney disease) 45,622 10. Intentional self-harm (suicide) 40,600 *Diseases to which poor diet contributes are in bold Unhealthy eating habits and ina Continue reading >>

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

This content describes the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States. Defining Overweight and Obesity A person whose weight is higher than what is considered as a normal weight adjusted for height is described as being overweight or having obesity.1 Fast Facts According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2013–20142,3,4,5 More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight. More than 2 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight or have obesity. More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to have obesity. About 1 in 13 adults were considered to have extreme obesity. About 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 2 to 19 were considered to have obesity. Using Body Mass Index (BMI) to Estimate Overweight and Obesity BMI is the tool most commonly used to estimate and screen for overweight and obesity in adults and children. BMI is defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. For most people, BMI is related to the amount of fat in their bodies, which can raise the risk of many health problems. A health care professional can determine if a person’s health may be at risk because of his or her weight. The tables below show BMI ranges for overweight and obesity. Adults An online tool for gauging the BMIs of adults can be found at: Children and Adolescents BMI of Children and Adolescents Ages 2 to 19 BMI Classification At or above the 85th percentile on the CDC growth charts Overweight or obesity At or above the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Obesity (including extreme obesity) At or above 120 percent of the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Extreme obesity Children grow at different rates at different times, so it is not always easy to tell if a child is overweight. The CDC BMI gro Continue reading >>

For People With Diabetes

For People With Diabetes

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: If you are living with diabetes or have a loved one with the disease, its important to work together to manage diabetes. Use these resources to learn how to make healthy lifestyle choices to help manage diabetes, prevent complications, and improve your quality of life. Diabetes means that your blood sugar (glucose) level is too high. Learn about the different types of diabetes and which groups are more likely to develop diabetes. Emotional issuessuch as depressionoften go along with diabetes. Learn how to cope with emotional struggles while managing your diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in young people. Learn about the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and find out how to lower your childs risk for getting type 2 diabetes. Take control of your health by working with your health care team and adopting healthy behaviors to avoid complications and enjoy a healthier life. Physical activity is a great way to help manage diabetes and stay at a healthy weight. Use these resources to learn how to incorporate exercise into your daily life. Type 2 diabetes occurs in people of all ages, but its more common in older adults. NDEP offers resources that can help older adults learn how to better manage their diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk for complications that may affect their hearts, eyes, feet, kidneys, and other parts of the body. Read about how to prevent these complications. Healthy eating is an important part of diabetes management, but it can be hard to know where to start. Use these resources to help you eat healthier at home, at work, and when dining out. Emergencies and natural disasters can seriously affect people with diabetes. Find out how to be prepared Continue reading >>

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