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Diabetes And Not Being Hungry

Should I Eat If I'm Not Hungry?

Should I Eat If I'm Not Hungry?

I have been a diabetic for over 40 years and have been on the insulin pump. I am not hungry for the most part all day long, and sometimes a week at a time. My A1C is 6.1 and my endocrinologist is very happy with my blood sugars. Should I force myself to eat, whether I am hungry or not? I do not feel weak or anything like that — I'm just not hungry. — Margo, New Hampshire The short answer is yes. You must try to eat for two reasons: to prevent hypoglycemia, and more importantly, to prevent malnutrition. Even though you do not feel weak, your body requires nutrients continuously for its vital functions. I recommend eating small portions frequently and choosing nutrient-dense foods to ensure that you have adequate intake. Work with your doctor or a nutritionist to calculate your caloric needs. I also suggest that, with your doctor’s help, you find the cause of your loss of appetite. Since you say you have had diabetes for 40 years, you might be experiencing gastrointestinal neuropathy, a type of neuropathy that affects the gut and can cause you to feel full. There are several other possible reasons for loss of appetite that should be explored with your doctor. If you have not been sleeping well, have felt down, and have difficulty concentrating, the loss of your appetite might be due to depression. Bring this to your doctor’s attention, as depression is treatable. She will also work with you to investigate other reasons for your loss of appetite. One final note: In those who have had diabetes for a long time, or have had repeated episodes of low blood sugar, the warning signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia can be blunted. In other words, you may not feel its symptoms until your blood sugar dips to a dangerously low level. You should be vigilant about checking your su Continue reading >>

Type 2 Not Hungry

Type 2 Not Hungry

what I ate today is 2 small clementines for breakfast Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy The usual statement is eat to your meter. If you are not hungry and your testing shows you are in an acceptable blood glucose level range then don't eat. I will caution that we do have to maintain good nutrition being diabetic or not. Think this proves once again that you should be testing. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control If you are not hungry no need to eat. If I ate the what you post my bg would be very high, only way to know is have a meter. My fadting today was 85. I wasn't hungry so I didn't force myself to eat. At 11 am I tested and my bg was 147. SO if you don't eat your liver may still dump extra glucose. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. After several months of using my meter, I've learned that if I don't eat something very soon after waking up - even if it's just a yogurt, my liver will make breakfast for me in the form of a glucose dump that will spike me above 140. I've also learned that if I don't eat something small every couple of hours during the day, I get "hangry" - irritable, easily frustrated, and cranky. I don't actually go low, but I dip into the high 90s. I always have a small low carb snack with me if I go somewhere - like some peanuts or a few grapes. Everybody is different, so what works well for me may not work for you. Dx: Type 2 in 04/2016; Diet induced oxalate kidney stones in Continue reading >>

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes? If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes? Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes. Susan’s story Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year. She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse. The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt. When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes? I suggest reading the following articles: We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found. Polyphagia: What is it? With polyphagia, even after having just eaten, you will feel hunger, or find that you have cravings for particular foods that monopolize your thoughts. The definition of polyphagia, wh Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

It's tempting -- and even sounds logical -- to skip meals: You're busy, you're not hungry, you're trying to lose weight, or your blood sugar is too high. Skipping meals, however, may actually increase your blood sugar and cause you to gain weight. Here are seven rewards of eating regularly scheduled meals when you live with diabetes. Reward 1: Improve fasting blood glucose numbers. During sleep, when you're not eating, the liver sends more glucose into the blood to fuel the body. For many people during the early years of having type 2 diabetes, the liver doesn't realize there is already more than enough glucose present. "Your morning (fasting) blood sugars have much more to do with your liver and hormonal functions than what you ate for dinner last night," says Kathaleen Briggs Early, Ph.D., RD, CDE, assistant professor of biochemistry and nutrition at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Washington Get more information about why your morning blood sugar is high and tips to help control fasting blood sugar. Real-life example: Until recently, if Cheryl Simpson's blood glucose meter flashed a high reading before breakfast, she might delay eating until midafternoon in an attempt to lower that number. Now Cheryl, PWD type 2, won't leave home without eating breakfast. Her blood glucose numbers have improved. "Plus, eating breakfast makes it a whole lot easier to make good food choices later on," she says. Tip: Pack a grab-and-go breakfast with these 13 quick-fix ideas! Reward 2: Stay off the blood sugar roller coaster. Irregular eating can have you "bouncing back and forth between normal blood sugars and high blood sugars," Early says. A meager meal can give you a meager rise in blood sugar. If you take one or more blood glucose-lowering medications tha Continue reading >>

Is It Normal To Not Feel Hungry?

Is It Normal To Not Feel Hungry?

You are here: Home Forums Starting the BSD Is it normal to not feel hungry? Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total) Hi, started this last Sunday with my hubby. He is type 2 diabetic and overweight and Im overweight. Today Ive not felt hungry at all and have eaten just because I felt I should. Should I do this or if Im not hungry just dont eat? Also Ive noticed I am weeing all the time. Also finding it strange to buy full fat stuff e.g yoghurt after years of buying fat free or low fat. We are weighing together tomorrow. Hoping for good results as I know my belly has changed but looks worse at mo. My belly hung over but is now sticking out and look pregnant! Hi SallyM, Welcome on board! Full fat food makes you fell a lot fuller isnt it lovely! Especially well done for starting it day one, many of us myself included took 2-3 weeks before we could touch full fat food because of the years of preconditioning that full-fat is bad for you. I would recommend keeping to around the 800cals as you need a balance of different nutrient and want to ensure you do keep full. Yes, at different times I (still) find myself weeing a lot. Some days it is normal other days not. You may find different things change at different rates so having lots of baseline measurements really helps. I was losing weight, but not as much off of my waist as hips to begin with and had to readjust to full fat and 60g carbs per day. That got the weight off of my waistline moving. If you have the measurements, you can keep motivated when one thing changes when another has not. It also help work out where things may need tweaked. (Steve now ex? diabetic) I think the diets trick is getting you off the carb/blood glucose roller coaster. Then you dont feel so hungry. I used to feel hungry all the time for years. Continue reading >>

Not Being Hungry | Diabetic Connect

Not Being Hungry | Diabetic Connect

i am insulin user, since 2000, my problem that i dont be hungrey, i eat because i have to, anyone else have this problem I also have times when I am not hungry but know that I need to eat because of being diabetic what I found helps me is Atkins Advantage shakes, I found them at walmart they have 15g of protein only 1 gram of sugar and are 160 calories, I bought the milk chocolate delight, at least I know I am getting something in my system whem I am not hungry enough to eat and it taste really good, it might want to be something you would tryI know at least then I am getting something in my system when I am not hungry enough to eat, give it a try Have the same problem. Sometimes I just do NOT want to eat anything. I've found that if I set a nice place setting prepare the meal and sit down to eat it will help. Other times I just can't seem to force anything down. Most of my medications require me to eat though so I've found that if nothing else works Glucerna has some acceptable meal replacement shakes. I just slam it down real quick and hope I can keep it down. Good luck with this one. It's a huge bummer. Let me know how to get it! Just kidd'n. I just got out of the hospital after major surgery. I know the feeling, for 2 weeks the anesthesia meds they gave me made me nausious. I lost 13 pounds. Now I am back to work, and my appetite is back too! I wish I could have just a little of that "have to eat but not want to". Must be medication that does that to you. All I can think of. Smuggies im guessing your sugars are under control!! im on the other end of the stick!! always hungry because im always high!! What sounds good to eat to you? Plan on having some of what sounds good to eat around the house, then when you do not feel like eating you can snack on that and thus ke Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

7 Symptoms To Never Ignore If You Have Diabetes

7 Symptoms To Never Ignore If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes watch for these warning signs that something is amiss – and make sure you know how to respond #1. Blurry vision. Vision changes may mean your blood sugar is high, says endocrinologist Alan L. Rubin, MD, author of Diabetes for Dummies, Type 1 Diabetes for Dummies and other health books in the “Dummies” series. “High blood sugar draws more fluid into the lens of the eye, so your vision is less sharp,” he explains. “The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar more frequently and bring it under better control.” Temporary blurriness may also occur when starting insulin. What to do: If problems persist despite good glucose numbers, tell your doctor. Eyesight changes may be caused by an easy-to-fix problem like dry eyes, be a side effect of some medications or even computer eye strain. But it can also be a warning sign of diabetic retinopathy – when tiny blood vessels at the back of the eye swell and leak. It could also be a sign of other vision issues like glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration. All can be treated to prevent further problems. #2. Unusual thirst and feeling extra-tired. High blood sugar is usually the culprit, according to the American Diabetes Association. But don’t shrug it off —letting your numbers drift beyond the healthy range sets you up for complications and could be a sign of a serious condition that needs immediate medical attention. What to do: Check your glucose level now and recheck frequently; make sure you’re following your eating and exercise plan and taking your medication as directed. If you’ve been sick, follow your sick-day plan; illness can make blood sugar rise. Extremely high blood sugar – over 600 mg/dL – can lead to seizures, coma and even death, the ADA warns. This condition Continue reading >>

Never Hungry | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Never Hungry | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I noticed today that I don't feel hunger. In fact I can't remember the last time I felt hungry, and seem to have lost physical indicators that I need to eat Even at hypo level, there are no symptoms of hunger at all. It's not a loss of appetite as such, I eat to refuel but can go for hours and hours in between meals without any internal reminder that I need to eat, so if I'm absorbed in something or just plain busy, I forget to eat And don't feel any need to eat, it's hard to describe . Previously I knew that food was needed, and experienced intense hunger with hypos. I think in retrospect this has been the case for a couple of years now. Has anyone else experienced this, and has the feeling of hunger returned ? Since I stopped eating snacks between meals I rarely get hungry, however I do still get the hunger feeling when getting going low, had this happen the other night even though my bg was 3.7 I have a pronounced reduction in hunger when I low carb. The more consistent and strict I am, the less hunger feelings I have. For a while there is a kind of "ghost" hunger that is just psychological, then that goes too. It makes me think I have never actually experienced hunger, only carb withdrawal. same, before low carb and diagnosis, I'd have a big carby tea and an hour later I was back at the fridge and pity the person if they were standing in my way. now, I don't get the starving hungry feeling I don't get hungry since lowering the carbs. I missed lunch today even after doing my circuit training this morning - just didn't feel the need to eat. Well I used to be like all of you. When I reduced carbs I stopped feeling hungry. However, I've just started t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hunger And Food Cravings

Diabetes Hunger And Food Cravings

Surveys find that nearly 100% of young women and almost 70% of young men sometimes have food cravings. For most people, cravings at worst add a little weight. With diabetes, they can be a serious problem. Food cravings might cause you to eat way too much of things that spike your sugars. What are food cravings, though? Where do they come from, and how can we deal with them in a healthy way? Let’s divide cravings into two types: physical hunger and emotional distress. It’s normal to feel strong hunger if blood sugar is low, or if your stomach is too empty. Then you really need to eat. If your sugar is low, you might need some carbs; if you just feel empty, some high-fiber vegetables or water might be preferable. Diabetes can cause hunger if glucose is not getting into the cells where it’s needed. Other medical causes of excess hunger include thyroid problems (such as Graves’ disease,) pregnancy, cannabis smoking, and depression. To avoid the cravings of low sugar or empty stomach, remember to eat regularly, especially breakfast. Breakfast with protein should keep cravings away at least until the afternoon. Eating may not stop some people’s low-sugar hunger. If that happens to you, you may need insulin, an insulin-sensitizing medication, or an herb such as bitter melon to get glucose into your cells. Food cravings are not always physical, though. In addition to body hunger and stomach hunger, there is what psychologist William Polonsky, PhD, CDE, calls mouth hunger or eyeball hunger. “While your stomach may be satisfied,” says Dr. Polonsky, “your eyeballs, mouth, and brain may still feel famished. If your meal plan is too limiting [in terms of food types], you may be depriving yourself of the joy of eating and the sense of satisfaction your mind and body c Continue reading >>

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

Whenever I meet with patients for the first time, I always ask them to “take me through a typical day” describing the foods they eat and meal patterns they follow. Often I will hear something like this: “Well I’m not of a breakfast person…” “So is the first time you eat, lunch?” “…well sometimes I don’t eat lunch either.” “If you do eat lunch, what will it be?” “Oh a sandwich or something quick…maybe some chips.” “Ok, so how about dinner?” “A meat, a vegetable and a potato…or sometimes something quick like a pizza.” “Ok, do you snack after dinner?” “Well, see that’s my problem…” Touche. It certainly is a problem, especially when they go on to describe what the evening snacking routine consists of. I’ll give you a hint: it’s not celery and carrot sticks. So what is the deal with eating at night? How can we avoid nighttime eating? Or more importantly, nighttime overeating? I've got plenty of tips for you to consider. 3 Reasons NOT To Munch Out At Night First things first. Whatever you've heard about not eating after a certain time (I’ve heard 5 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm) because everything turns into fat, is just not supported by research. While it IS the case that, generally speaking, the body is more efficient at burning calories when it needs them (ie during the day), compared to when we're sedentary, the rule about a specific time of day is not substantiated by research. That said, I strongly discourage eating much in the evening for the following reasons: 1. Most people make relatively poor food choices in the evening. This is likely due to poor inhibition – we are less likely to make smart choices as our bodies and minds fatigue at the end of the day. Or it's often due to making up for insufficient food intake thr Continue reading >>

Don't Feel Like Eating

Don't Feel Like Eating

D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin I can tell my blood sugar is a little low, I test it, and it's under 100. But I am not remotely hungry. That's right now. Sometimes my stomach or intestinal area is not feeling well (I have diahrrea a lot because of food allergies). But I don't want my blood sugar to drop too low... My belief is that if you don't feel hungry don't eat. Early in life I suffered from my parent's depression era of enforcement of CLEAN your plate. Of course back then they had much smaller plates of food. Your body will tell you if you are truly in danger and need food. It sounds to me like you just don't feel well and your body is not in need of food. I low carb and I find that I often don't feel hungry either. That's why (how) we lose weight. D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin Well, the problem with that is that I don't think my body sends normal hunger signals. I think sometimes I wait too long to eat and then my stomach gets upset because it's empty (and it doesn't feel normal hunger). 4 hours had passed, so it was time to eat. I forced myself to eat, and now I feel better I just wish I knew why I don't always feel hungry sometimes when I should. Maybe it's the Metformin? when i get down below about 65 i go into a kind of daze. i know i should get up and eat something but i just feel... relaxed? so far it hasn't been so bad that i don't do something about it eventually, but it scares me sometimes. B When the wrong man uses the right means, the right means work in the wrong way. From my woman: An M&M in each hand is not a balanced diet. D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin Yeah, exactly, and the thing is wanting to make myself food when I feel like that, yuk. It would be fine if I could jus Continue reading >>

Food Issues & Type 1 Diabetes

Food Issues & Type 1 Diabetes

This month I’m talking about something that I bet many of us struggle with. I know that it is a real battle for me, and it is starting to make sense why. The topic is also starting to pop up more and more in some of the media blurbs and articles I’ve seen recently. I knew weeks before I wrote my viewpoints article what I wanted to write about. The basic concept is that being a type 1 diabetic, there are a few factors contributing to the problems I have with food. Growing up on R and NPH insulins, I had to eat at certain times, whether I was hungry or not. Because of this my natural “hungry/satisfied” wires are all messed up. Even on a pump and using just Humalog/Novolog, we still often have to override our natural instincts (ever been full and low at the same time?). Again, my wires are all crossed up. As a type 1 diabetic I am lacking amylin, a hormone that plays a role in digestion and telling the brain I am satisfied. I am missing a critical “stop eating” signal between my stomach and my brain. A few days before I wrote and submitted my viewpoints article, the dLife Update | Newsletter (February 26, 2010 – Vol. 6 No. 8 ) ran a “Spotlight” on eating disorders. I thought the timing was perfect. The introduction was perfect – it said “Diabetes puts a daily focus on food and nutrition. For some people, especially teens, this constant focus could lead to the creation of food fixations that may be difficult to overcome…”. From what little I have heard about eating disorders and treatment, focusing so much on what we eat is exactly what people in treatment are NOT supposed to do. Precisely the point of the Spotlight introduction – that people with diabetes HAVE to focus on it. This spotlight feature actually included a quiz, where you answered 26 Continue reading >>

Not Hungry - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Not Hungry - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. i was wondering what you guys do if your not hungry? i know im suppose to eat and not skip any meals....but dont you ever get to the point sometimes where you just dont wanna eat? Sometimes I don't want to eat at all and sometimes I wan to eat way to much but I am lucky in that I can be the boring type. Same food, same time, everyday. Boring but it works for me. Yes, I do get where I don't want to eat and sometimes it lasts for a day or two. The problem is if I don't eat my liver starts dumping glucose uncontrolably into my blood and it's as bad or worse than over eating. So when it's time to eat I eat. That way I keep bg on a much better level and don't feel bad. Yes, I often get to the point where, not having eaten I then just don't want to eat. I have learnt to force myself to eat a small buscuit or piece of cheese and this often gets my system going. Prior to this my wife used to force me to eat because if I didn't I would just slowly go to sleep - or become irrational. My liver doesn't pump in the way Harold's does, presumably because of the high dose of Meformin I'm on - it certainly used to on lower doses. Up until a week ago, I was often skipping meals because I wasnt hungry, and was all over the place wih my test results. I got some great advice (thanks John!!!) to eat proper meals, and my bgs are much better... Far easier to control It's different as a type 2 i know, but I am a type 1 and find that when my BS is high, I am not hungry AT ALL. In those cases, I may give myself enough rapid to bring me down to about 10.0, and just not eat. Or I may give the rapid, wait a while, and the Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Loss Of Appetite

Diabetes: Loss Of Appetite

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that interferes with the body’s ability to control the level of glucose in the blood. No matter what type of diabetes you have, symptoms develop as a result of high blood glucose levels, according to MayoClinic.com. Complications can cause a loss of appetite that lasts for more than a couple of days. Video of the Day When trying to determine the cause for your loss of appetite, your health care provider may ask whether you feel nauseous, have stomach pain or vomiting or are currently taking any medications. Your doctor may also ask if your loss of appetite came on gradually or suddenly and if you've recently lost weight. Mention how long it has been since you first noticed changes in your appetite. Tell your doctor if there is a family history of diabetes. Until your appetite returns to normal, you are at risk for malnutrition and other health problems; therefore, you need to find out the underlying cause for your decrease in appetite. Complications can occur when diabetes goes undiagnosed for an extended length of time. Suffering a loss of appetite for a few weeks or more can lead to malnutrition, a condition where your body does not get the nutrients it needs. Aside from possible malnutrition, if left untreated, diabetes can damage the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Undiagnosed diabetes can also cause circulation problems, heart attack and stroke. Although there is no cure for the disease, you can prevent complications from occurring by maintaining a healthy weight and controlling blood glucose levels. Monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol levels, eating a balanced diet, being physically active and seeing your doctor regularly are additional steps you can take to help manage your diabetes. If hyperglycemia goes untreated, diabet Continue reading >>

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