diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Muscle

Diabetes, Muscles, And The Myth Of Ulysses' Bow

Diabetes, Muscles, And The Myth Of Ulysses' Bow

At the end of Homer's Odyssey, after 20 years of adventurous traveling, the goddess Athena brings Ulysses back to Ithaca disguised as an old man. With little hope for Ulysses' return, his faithful wife Penelope has reluctantly agreed to marry whoever wins a contest using Ulysses' bow. In spite of his infirmed appearance, Ulysses is the only contestant strong enough to string the bow and shoot an arrow through 12 axe-handles. Thus, the image of a hero as the “only one who can string the bow” has been embedded in civilization since before the beginning of written history and suggests that from time immemorial, people have equated strong muscles with youth and good health. Thousands of years later, we are beginning to understand exactly how health and age affect muscle, and we are now on the cusp of translating that knowledge into medical research and practice. In this issue of Diabetes Care, Park et al. (1) from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study group report that in individuals aged 70–79 years, a diagnosis of diabetes is associated with accelerated decline in muscle mass, especially in women and in subjects with undiagnosed diabetes. These longitudinal findings open an important chapter in our understanding of the complications and consequences of diabetes and its effect on physical function. However, to fully understand the relevance of these findings, we should interpret them in the context of the known effects of age on body composition and of diabetes on muscle strength and physical function (2,3). The aging process is associated with consistent changes in body composition in all animal species, from worms to rodents to primates, with few exceptions (4–6). With increasing age, lean body mass decreases and fat mass (and possibly connective tissue m Continue reading >>

Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Show Muscle Metabolic Deficiencies

Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Show Muscle Metabolic Deficiencies

Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Show Muscle Metabolic Deficiencies Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Show Muscle Metabolic Deficiencies Participants with type 1 diabetes had significantly lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity. HealthDay News Physically active young adults with type 1 diabetes have alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and bioenergetics within skeletal muscle, according to a study published in Diabetologia. Cynthia M.F. Monaco, from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and colleagues examined skeletal muscle mitochondrial phenotype in 12 physically active, young adults with type 1 diabetes and 12 controls without diabetes matched for sex, age, body mass index , and level of physical activity. Participants underwent vastus lateralis muscle microbiopsies. The researchers found that, compared with the control group, participants with type 1 diabetes had significantly lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity, specifically at Complex II of the electron transport chain, with no between-group differences in mitochondrial content. Increased mitochondrial H2O2 emission at Complex III and decreased Ca2+ retention capacity was seen in muscles of those with type 1 diabetes relative to controls. Participants with type 1 diabetes had an increase in the size and number of autophagic remnants in muscles; however, levels of the autophagic regulatory protein, phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, and its downstream targets were similar between groups. "Alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and bioenergetics are evident within the skeletal muscle of active young adults with type 1 diabetes," the authors write. "It is yet to be elucidated whether more rigorous exercise may help to prevent skeletal muscle metabolic deficiencies in both active and ina Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

This article is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body right through to the professional bodybuilder, and athlete looking to improve performance. How do you build muscle? Lift weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? {Repeat} ^ Yes, Pretty much! Everyone has the potential to build muscle over the course of their lifetime. Some people are happy with the level of muscle mass they have while others desire more for performance and aesthetic related reasons. The ability to gain muscle is highly specific to an individual’s genetics, baseline hormone levels and day to day activity. Many of these factors change as we age, reducing our capacity to gain muscle as we age. In other words, Muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. The effect of age on work capacity and muscle growth is a complex and lengthy subject. In fact, there is an hour long video module on the topic on the member’s site (coming soon). Anyhow, The best way to stimulate muscle growth is regular weights resistance training or loaded body movement. Even though we perform loaded movements daily, such as Squatting down to pick up our pets, Carrying the groceries to the car, Pushing annoying people ‘out the way.’ Pulling the kids around, Picking things up (hip-hinge) of the ground Day to Day Movement Isn’t Enough. None of these movements load our muscles heavily or frequently enough to stimulate gains in muscle mass. Weights resistance training is an incredibly useful tool for increasing muscle mass, especially with diabetes. The intensity (load) and frequency of training determine the stress placed on the body’s musculature and consequently determine how fast muscle tissue is gained. Training means nothing without recovery. For the body to get the best Continue reading >>

5 Ways Strength Training Can Help You Manage Diabetes

5 Ways Strength Training Can Help You Manage Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes management, strength training doesn’t always get the attention that aerobic exercises like running, walking, and bicycling do. But the truth is that a well-rounded fitness regimen should include both — and strength training has some unique benefits. While “strength training” may conjure images of bodybuilders lifting heavy weights, it doesn’t have to be that extreme. Strength training is defined simply as exercise you perform by moving part of your body against resistance. “That’s why it’s sometimes called resistance training,” says Karen Kemmis, PT, DPT, MS, a physical therapist and certified diabetes educator at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York. Good examples are exercises that use stretchy elastic bands, or free weights like dumbbells and barbells. Calisthenics — exercises that use your own body weight — such as pushups and sit-ups qualify as strength training exercise, too. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends at least two sessions of strength training a week, in addition to a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity. “Strength training twice a week is good; three times a week is preferable. You should have at least one day of rest between sessions,” Kemmis says. A strength-training session should include a minimum of five exercises that work major muscle groups in the arms, legs, and trunk, she adds. 5 Benefits of Strength Training For people with diabetes, regular strength training can: 1. Help you use insulin more effectively. Insulin is a hormone that allows blood sugar (glucose) to enter your cells, where it’s used for energy (or stored for later). Pumping your muscles helps push glucose into them; regular strength training helps your body become Continue reading >>

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae, with Type-2 DM representing the most common form of the disease. Neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of DM are common and the practicing chiropractor should be alert to these conditions, as some are manageable in a chiropractic office, while others are life and/or limb threatening. This paper reviews the effects of DM on the musculoskeletal system so as assist the chiropractor in making appropriate clinical decisions regarding therapy, understanding contraindications to therapy, referring patients to medical physicians when appropriate and understanding the impact that DM may have on the prognosis for their patients suffering from the myriad musculoskeletal conditions associated with this disease. Keywords: diabetes, musculoskeletal, chiropractic Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae. It is thought to affect almost 17 million Americans, only 11 million of whom have been diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association. In type 1 diabetes, a lack of insulin results in poor carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. Insulin is functionally absent, typically due to immune-mediated destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, though other etiologies of beta cell destruction have also been implicated, including drugs, chemicals, viruses, mitochondrial gene defects, pancreatectomy and ionizing radiation.1 Type 1 DM (DM1) occurs most commonly in juveniles. It can occur in adults, especially in those in their late 30s and early 40s. Unlike people with Type 2 DM ( Continue reading >>

Diabetic Myopathy: Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Cells

Diabetic Myopathy: Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Cells

Diabetic myopathy: impact of diabetes mellitus on skeletal muscle progenitor cells Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Edited by: Lucas Guimares-Ferreira, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Brazil Reviewed by: Espen Spangenburg, University of Maryland, USA; Carlos Hermano J. Pinheiro, University of So Paulo, Brazil; Rebecca Berdeaux, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, USA *Correspondence: Thomas J. Hawke, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada e-mail: [email protected] This article was submitted to Striated Muscle Physiology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Physiology. Received 2013 Oct 31; Accepted 2013 Dec 4. Copyright 2013 D'Souza, Al-Sajee and Hawke. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases that are associated with the presence of a hyperglycemic state due to impairments in insulin release and/or function. While the development of each form of diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) drastically differs, resultant pathologies often overlap. In each diabetic condition, a failure to maintain healthy muscle is often observed, and is termed diabetic myopathy. This significant, but often overlooked, complication is believe Continue reading >>

Impact Of Diabetes On Muscle Mass, Muscle Strength, And Exercise Tolerance In Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting - Sciencedirect

Impact Of Diabetes On Muscle Mass, Muscle Strength, And Exercise Tolerance In Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting - Sciencedirect

Volume 58, Issue 2 , September 2011, Pages 173-180 Impact of diabetes on muscle mass, muscle strength, and exercise tolerance in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting The impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on muscle mass, muscle strength, and exercise tolerance in patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has not been fully elucidated. We enrolled 329 consecutive patients who received cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after CABG (DM group, n=178; non-DM group, n=151) and measured lean body weight, mid-upper arm muscle area (MAMA), and handgrip power (HGP) at the beginning of CR. We also performed an isokinetic strength test of the knee extensor (Ext) and flexor (Flex) muscles and a cardiopulmonary exercise testing at the same time. No significant differences in risk factors, including age, gender, number of diseased vessels, or ejection fraction were observed between the 2 groups. The levels of Ext muscle strength, peak oxygen uptake, and anaerobic threshold were significantly lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group (all p<0.05). Both peak oxygen uptake and MAMA correlated with Ext and Flex muscle strength as well as HGP (all p<0.005). The MAMA, HGP, and Ext muscle strength were lower in patients who received insulin therapy than in those who did not. Interestingly, fasting glucose levels significantly and negatively correlated with Ext muscle strength. These data suggest that DM patients had a lower muscle strength and exercise tolerance than non-DM patients. Moreover, a high glucose level may affect these deteriorations in DM patients after CABG. Continue reading >>

5 Necessities To Build Muscle And Strength As A Diabetic

5 Necessities To Build Muscle And Strength As A Diabetic

The music at my gym is blaring hardcore rock as I’m setting up to do my third heavy set on bench press. I have already warmed up and found my groove and I hear “BEEP! BEEP!”. Low blood sugar. Great. My entire workout gets put on pause as shove a mini pack of gummies in my mouth while other lifters stare at me (probably jealous of my mid-set snack). I walk around and wait for my blood sugar to go up little before I can even think about getting back in the groove— all while I’m starring at the vending machine, holding myself back from eating everything I can get my hands on. Diabetes can be a pain— especially when you are trying to build muscle and strength. Having your life run by this number on a machine can be like some new age blood glucose dictatorship if you don’t manage it while you train. But it is not impossible to build an epic physique and get ridiculously strong as a diabetic. Quite the opposite actually as bodybuilders take insulin to get bigger. Insulin is one of the most anabolic (muscle building) hormones in the human body. It just takes control and understanding Here are five methods to controlling your diabetes during exercise so that you can build an awesome body and get strong: Understand what’s Going On: Depending on what type of exercise you are doing, your blood sugar may react differently so you have to be prepared by understanding the process! Both cardio and weight training increase insulin sensitivity during and up to 7 hours post-exercise so reducing your basal or bolus may help you control the extreme lows post exercise. This means any insulin you take will be more effective at a lower dose after exercise. High intensity exercise resulting in roughly >70% VO2 max or >85% max heart rate like strength training and crossfit can ca Continue reading >>

Joint And Muscle Problems Associated With Diabetes

Joint And Muscle Problems Associated With Diabetes

Home » Related Health Issues » Joint and Muscle Problems Associated with Diabetes Joint and Muscle Problems Associated with Diabetes Introduction Connective Tissue Disorders Tests Your Doctor May Carry Out Myopathy Cheiroarthropathy Frozen Shoulder Trigger Finger Dupuytren’s Contracture Carpel Tunnel Stiff Man’s Syndrome [SMS] Also Known as Stiff Person’s Syndome Diffuse idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis [DISH] Introduction Joint and skeletal disorders, known as connective tissue disorders, are recognised as complications of diabetes but they tend to receive less attention than the other complications and the progress of these conditions is often not monitored. This could be because they are not life-threatening but they can be distressing and painful conditions that may adversely affect lifestyles for many people. One thing that seems clear, is that no one seems to know the causes of these conditions or if there are certain people who are more susceptible to them. It seems unacceptable to simply put them down to ‘long-term diabetes’. In the IDDT Newsletter April 2003, Rae Price described how she had developed pains in her hands and feet and was diagnosed with cheiroarthropathy but no one seemed to have heard of it! But she changed to animal insulin and not only felt better but the general stiffness and pain had disappeared. Rae’s diary resulted in many phone calls and letters from people with various joint and muscle problems, so we decided to take a look! Continue reading >>

Muscular System - Diabetes And Muscles

Muscular System - Diabetes And Muscles

Together, our muscles can hold a large quantity of stored glucose The muscular system is made up of around 650 muscles and account for around half of the weight of our body. As well controlling the movement of our body, they also control the movements of organs such as the bladder and intestines. The muscles need fuel to operate and take in glucose from our blood, thus playing in the regulation of our blood sugar levels. Our skeletal muscles are voluntary muscles meaning our thoughts dictate which muscles contract and when, thus allowing us walk or run, write or type and play sports or music. Muscles work by contracting, that is they shorten and become more compact. Our biceps work by contracting which folds the forearm closer the upper arm. The biceps cannot move the arm the other way but they can relax and allow the triceps, on the opposite side of the upper arm, to contract and straighten the arm. As well as controlling our movement, the skeletal muscles are able to generate heat helping us to maintain body temperature. Smooth muscles are muscles which are controlled by our nerves without us having to think about it. These involuntary muscles are found in our arteries, veins, within the bladder and within our intestines. If diabetes damages the nerves of these muscles, it can cause problems. For example, if the smooth muscles of the bladder are affected, this may lead to incontinence or being unable to urinate. The cardiac muscles control the beating of our heart and have to work constantly through our life to keep us alive. The cardiac muscle can also be affected by diabetes. If the nerves that control the beating of the heart become damaged, beating of the heart can be disrupted, resulting in irregular heart beats or even heart failure. The heart can also be affec Continue reading >>

Building Muscle With Diabetes

Building Muscle With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes won't stop you from building muscle. However, it's wise to follow a few precautions when it comes to gaining muscle. There are many different types of exercise and one of the most popular is strength or power training, which is very effective for building strong bones and muscles. Strong muscles collect oxygen and nutrients from the blood much more efficiently than weak ones, meaning that any physical activity you do will require less cardiac work and put less strain on your heart. As well as being good for the heart, they also improve weight control and help the body remain sensitive to the hormone insulin, which is vital for keeping blood sugar levels in check and preventing or controlling type 2 diabetes. Here are some tips on how you can build strong, lean muscle, without affecting your diabetes: Load up on protein Protein intake is vital for building muscle. However, your body constantly drains its protein reserves for other uses such as producing hormones, resulting in less protein available for muscle building. To counteract this, you need to build and store new proteins faster than your body breaks down old proteins. You should look to consume about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which is roughly the maximum amount your body can use in a day. Good sources of protein include: Chicken Tuna Eggs, milk and cottage cheese Protein shakes (see below for more about shakes) Remember, the more protein your body stores (protein synthesis), the larger your muscles grow. Have a protein shake before your workout Protein shakes are very effective for improving strength. While many trainers have a post-workout shake, research has shown that drinking a shake containing at least 6 grams of amino acids - the muscle-building blocks of protein - an Continue reading >>

Gaining Muscle With Type 1 Diabetes: An Intro Guide

Gaining Muscle With Type 1 Diabetes: An Intro Guide

When I was 14 years old, I decided my goal in life was to get a 6-pack. “Why?” you ask. In gym class, as a part of our weightlifting unit, we were told to do 40 v-ups in as few sets as possible. Guess how many I did? Four. That was it. I thought I was going to die. My midsection burned like crazy. More importantly, I was mortified as my classmates ripped off seemingly endless v-ups around me. So, I vowed to obtain that 6 pack and do my v-ups religiously. Suddenly, 40 v-ups weren’t difficult. I moved to 50, then 60, and then 70 consecutively. I accidentally stumbled upon what would become one of my life’s passions: gaining muscle. I’m here to give you some of the Do’s and Don’ts with respect to gaining muscle while staying lean and maintaining a great A1c at the same time. Do: Eat a caloric surplus Contrary to what anyone may try to tell you, resistance training and type 1 diabetes mix, and they mix very well. You can find countless reasons in the archives on this site. But for gaining weight, especially muscle mass? It’s about balance. Balance, patience, and consistency. No matter how you slice it, weight gain of any type, muscle included, requires a caloric surplus. Why? Because you’re creating new tissue. You can’t create something out of nothing. You need inputs (calories) to create outputs (lean muscle mass). Let me repeat: you will NOT gain weight OR muscle if you are NOT in a caloric surplus. However, don’t let this fool you: the “See Food” approach of “I see it, I eat it, with no regard to caloric content except for the insulin I take” is not the optimal way to gain weight. You’ll be chasing high and low blood sugars constantly with the massive amounts of insulin you’ll be taking, and the majority of the weight you gain will be f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes, Muscle Strength, And Impaired Physical Function

Type 2 Diabetes, Muscle Strength, And Impaired Physical Function

The tip of the iceberg? There is growing recognition that the complications associated with type 2 diabetes may translate into functional impairment in older people (1). This may reflect a link between the metabolic and mechanical functions of muscle. However, the possibility that the link between glucose tolerance and physical function extends to people without diabetes has not been previously considered. The objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship among glucose tolerance, muscle strength, and physical function in men and women with and without type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A cross-sectional survey within a cohort study design was used. Information was obtained on self-reported diabetes status cross-checked with medication data, glucose, and insulin levels 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test (for participants without a previous diagnosis of diabetes) (2), grip strength using a Jamar dynamometer (3), and physical function using the physical function component of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form questionnaire. This is a measure of subjective health status widely validated in both men and women (4,5). The population-based study sample consisted of 1,391 men and women aged between 60 and 70 years and living in the English county of Hertfordshire. Additional information was collected on medical and social history, physical activity, height, and weight. The study had ethical approval from the North and East Hertfordshire Local Research Ethics Committee, and all subjects gave written informed consent. The methods for the cohort study have been described previously (6). Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and linear and logistic regression were used to analyze the data with the Stata 8.0 statistical package. Known di Continue reading >>

Muscle Mass

Muscle Mass

The amount of skeletal muscle in the body. The ratio of a person’s muscle mass to the total body weight is called the skeletal muscle index. In response to insulin, skeletal muscle uses glucose in the bloodstream for energy, and research has shown that for every 10% increase in the skeletal muscle index, there is an 11% reduction in insulin resistance (a condition in which more insulin is needed to control blood glucose levels) and a 12% reduction in the risk of prediabetes (a borderline condition in which a person’s blood glucose level is higher than normal but not high enough to be considered diabetic). People tend to lose muscle mass as they age, and those with diabetes tend to lose muscle mass faster than nondiabetic individuals of the same age. Fortunately, strength exercises can increase muscle mass and improve blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. In addition to regular aerobic exercise, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends regular strength training at least two times a week for people with diabetes. According to ADA, strength training activities include using free weights or weight machines at a fitness facility, using resistance bands, lifting light objects in the home such as canned goods and water bottles and engaging in exercises that use your own body weight, such as push-ups, sit-ups and squats. Want to learn more about using exercise to help manage diabetes? Read “Increasing Insulin Sensitivity,” “Making Exercise More Fun,” and “Picking the Right Activity to Meet Your Fitness Goals.” Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes

Editor’s Note: Phil Graham (BSc, CISSN) is a certified sports nutritionist and competitive body builder. Learn more of his training tips on his site Diabetic Muscle and Fitness. This is a basic overview of how muscle tissue is built and the important considerations people living with diabetes need to make in order to maximize their muscle growth potential. This advice is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body or for the professional bodybuilder and athlete looking to increase performance. How do you build muscle? Lift heavy weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? Pretty much! Generally speaking, these behaviours can be classified into two distinct categories: Stimulus Recovery Stimulus Throughout our life, muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. This is naturally dictated by our day-to-day activity, genetics and the influence of key hormones. Everyone has the potential to build muscle. However, some people want to build more muscle than others. This is largely for aesthetic and sporting performance reasons. To accelerate muscle growth, there needs to be a stimulus. Weight-resistance training serves as the perfect stimulus for muscle growth. While the body’s muscles are challenged on a daily basis through movements like squat, deadlift, press and pull. Not many of these movements are loaded heavily or frequently enough to stimulate substantial gains in muscle mass. This is where scheduled weight training comes into play. Through frequent training exposure, the body adapts itself to deal with loaded movements by increasing its physical strength through newly acquired muscle mass. Load and training frequency are the limiting factors to muscle growth; however, for the body to make the most out of a regular laoded t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes