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Diabetes And Mental Health Statistics

On The Association Between Diabetes And Mental Disorders In A Community Sample

On The Association Between Diabetes And Mental Disorders In A Community Sample

Results from the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine the relationship between mental disorders and diabetes in a representative community sample. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a cross-sectional study. Data on diabetes and HbA1c values were obtained by structured questionnaires and by laboratory assessments. Current psychiatric disorders were diagnosed by a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). RESULTS—People with diabetes (PWD) were not more likely to meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for at least one mental disorder than were individuals without diabetes. However, a different diagnostic pattern occurred compared with the general population: odds ratios (ORs) for anxiety disorders in PWD were higher (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.19–3.14). Although PWD had higher prevalence rates of affective disorders, the relationship between diabetes and affective disorders was not statistically significant after controlling for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic status. In contrast, the relationship between diabetes and anxiety disorders remained significant after controlling for these variables. In contrast to individuals without mental disorders, PWD with affective or anxiety disorders more frequently had adequate glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS—Diabetes was associated with an increased likelihood of anxiety disorders. The association between mental disorders, diabetes, and glycemic control should be evaluated carefully in terms of potentially confounding sociodemographic variables, sample characteristics, and definitions of the disorders. During the last years, the comorbidity of mental disorders with chronic health co Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

WRITTEN BY: Mark Heyman, PhD, CDE How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health is part of our Mental Health series. Type 1 isn’t just about counting carbs, checking BGLs and administering insulin. The disease takes an emotional and psychological toll as well. Check out other clinical information and personal stories about Mental Health. When I tell people I am a psychologist who specializes in diabetes, they usually look confused. Most people think of diabetes as a physical condition and have never really thought about the mental aspects with living with the condition. Even some people with diabetes are surprised that there are organizations like CDMH that focus on diabetes and mental health. They know that living with diabetes is hard for them, but often they are surprised to hear that their concerns are actually (and unfortunately) quite common. What is it about diabetes that is so hard? I tend to think about diabetes and mental health issues very broadly. While some people with diabetes have a mental health condition (that may or may not be related to having diabetes), there are many others who struggle with issues that are very real, but which may not meet the (sometimes arbitrary) criteria for a mental health diagnosis. Psychology is the study of how situations, emotions and relationships in our lives interact and impact our behavior. I think that this definition provides us with a framework we can use to talk about how diabetes impacts mental health. Situation Diabetes is a self-managed condition. This means that it is the person with diabetes, not their doctor, who is responsible for taking care of him or herself on a daily basis. Diabetes involves making frequent, sometimes life or death decisions under sometimes stressful and physically uncomfortable circumstances Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

Depression can strike anyone, but people with diabetes may be at a greater risk. Diabetes is a serious health concern that afflicts an estimated 16 million Americans. Treatment for depression helps people manage symptoms of both diseases, thus improving the quality of their lives. Several studies suggest that diabetes doubles the risk of depression compared to those without the disorder. The chances of becoming depressed increase as diabetes complications worsen. Research shows that depression leads to poorer physical and mental functioning, so a person is less likely to follow a required diet or medication plan. Treating depression with psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of these treatments can improve a patient’s well-being and ability to manage diabetes. Causes underlying the association between depression and diabetes are unclear. Depression may develop because of stress but also may result from the metabolic effects of diabetes on the brain. Studies suggest that people with diabetes who have a history of depression are more likely to develop diabetic complications than those without depression. People who suffer from both diabetes and depression tend to have higher health care costs in primary care. Despite the enormous advances in brain research in the past 20 years, depression often goes undiagnosed and untreated. People with diabetes, their families and friends, and even their physicians may not distinguish the symptoms of depression. However, skilled health professionals will recognize these symptoms and inquire about their duration and severity, diagnose the disorder, and suggest appropriate treatment. The Basics About Depression Depression is a serious medical condition that affects thoughts, feelings, and the ability to function in everyday life. Continue reading >>

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression? Know The Facts

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression? Know The Facts

Some studies show that having diabetes doubles your risk of developing depression. If diabetes-related health problems emerge, your risk for depression can increase even further. It remains unclear exactly why this is. Some researchers suggest that this could be due to diabetes' metabolic effect on brain function as well as the toll day-to-day management can take. It’s also possible that people with depression are more likely to develop diabetes. Because of this, it’s recommended that people who have a history of depression be screened for diabetes. Keep reading for more on the connection between diabetes and depression, as well as information on diagnosis, treatment, and more. Although more research is needed to fully understand the link between diabetes and depression, it’s clear that there’s a connection. It’s thought that alterations in brain chemistry tied to diabetes may be related to the development of depression. For example, damage resulting from diabetic neuropathy or blocked blood vessels in the brain may contribute to the development of depression in people with diabetes. Conversely, changes in the brain due to depression may cause an increased risk for complications. Studies have shown that people with depression are at higher risk for diabetes complications, but is has been difficult to determine which causes which. It hasn’t been determined if depression increases the risk for complications, or vice versa. Symptoms of depression can make it more difficult to successfully manage diabetes and prevent diabetes-related complications. A 2011 study found that people who have type 2 diabetes and experience symptoms of depression often have higher blood sugar levels. Additionally, the results of a separate 2011 study suggest that people who have both Continue reading >>

Mental Health Awareness: The Most Common Problems Experienced By People With Diabetes

Mental Health Awareness: The Most Common Problems Experienced By People With Diabetes

Mental health awareness: The most common problems experienced by people with diabetes Jack is a 27-year-old journalist based in Coventry, UK. He is a type 1 diabetic who enjoys sport, boring weekends, MTV and once won a talent show for dancing to Dario Gs 1997 hit Sunchyme. Its no secret that having diabetes makes you more likely to experience problems with mental health. The complex nature of diabetes management can lead to feelings of anger, frustration and depression. Its not uncommon, in fact its probably more widespread than you think. Unfortunately, people with diabetes can often feel reluctant to speak to a healthcare professional about mental health problems . This might be because they believe the negative emotions will go away or that it is nothing to worry about. But failure to address mental health issues can often worsen symptoms and affect your long-term health. This is why we decided to survey people with diabetes in a bid to assess the mental health issues faced by the diabetes community. We questioned 1,428 people about their mental fitness, history of mental illness and diabetes management; 54% of whom had type 2 diabetes, 41% had type 1 diabetes. One of the first questions we asked participants was if they had been diagnosed with any other health conditions. Remarkably, the two conditions most selected were depression (35.5%) and anxiety (27.7%). We then asked participants about issues they had with their diabetes. A total of 25.6% who felt overwhelmed by their diabetes regarded this as a moderate problem, while 25.2% said they felt guilty when they went off track with their management. No correlation could be gleaned between diabetes issues and those who had anxiety or depression, but as standalone statistics they are worryingly indicative of the ef Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Poor Mental Health And Wellbeing: An Exploratory Analysis

Diabetes And Poor Mental Health And Wellbeing: An Exploratory Analysis

Enter the email address where you would like the PDF sent. This address will not be used for any other purpose. Please enter your Email address Valid email required Diabetes and poor mental health and wellbeing are both common health conditions in Australia and contribute substantially to the overall burden of disease. A large proportion of people with diabetes are also living with poor mental health and wellbeing, with 41.6% of adult Australians with diabetes also reporting medium, high or very high levels of psychological distress. Australians with diabetes are significantly more likely than other Australians to have poor mental health and wellbeing. Definitions, data sources, methods and measures 2.2 What is poor mental health and wellbeing? Prevalence of diabetes and poor mental health and wellbeing in the population Prevalence of poor mental health and wellbeing among people with diabetes 4.3 Hospitalisations with a mental health condition 4.4 Mental health-related MBS services for people with diabetes 4.5 Prevalence of poor mental health and wellbeing among subgroups of the population with diabetes Appendix 4: Sample size and population estimates Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mental Health - Anger, Denial, Fear & Depression

Diabetes And Mental Health - Anger, Denial, Fear & Depression

Mental Health - Anger, Fear, Denial & Depression Mental health is just as important as your body's health Diabetes diagnosis can often lead to anger, denial, fear or depression. These can range from mild feelings of irritation through to serious depression. Diabetes and mental health is a serious issue that needs better consideration and a range of care solutions. Like many mental health problems, those caused by diabetes are often underestimated or ignored. Anger is a common response to diabetes, and is completely natural. People who have been diagnosed with diabetes may wonder why it has affected them when many of their friends or relatives do not have the condition. Diabetes diagnosis is unfair, and sometimes anger can lead recently diagnosed diabetics to neglect their diabetes management or diabetes treatment. Denial is another common emotion felt following diabetes diagnosis. Denial is a difficult emotion, and happens when people refuse to believe that something has happened to them. Many people experience denial upon diagnosis. Fear is another common response to diabetes diagnosis. Fear occurs when contemplating the present and future managing diabetes causes fright. Diabetes is a serious condition that requires regular management, therefore fear is a natural response. However, if fear is preventing you from managing your condition it can become a serious problem. Diabetes can be a difficult condition to accept and it is not uncommon for mental health issues such as depression to occur before or following a diabetes diagnosis . Depression is a feeling of sadness that will go away, and it can seriously affect quality of life. If you have been feeling hopeless for more than a week you are suffering from depression. If you have been feeling hopeless for more than a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mental Illness: Factors To Keep In Mind

Diabetes And Mental Illness: Factors To Keep In Mind

Cholesterol Disorders, , , , Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) (eg, schizophrenia) are at higher risk for medical comorbidities than those in the general population. The presence of SMI affects mortality as well as morbidity. The life span of men with schizophrenia is approximately 10 years shorter than that of men who do not have schizophrenia, while women with schizophrenia live an average of 9 years fewer than normal.1 Explanations for this higher likelihood of coexisting medical conditions and decreased average life span in persons with schizophrenia have focused on the ways schizophrenia or its treatments may predispose patients to greater incidence and severity of medical illness. For example, schizophrenia has been associated with reduced pain sensitivity, a phenomenon that can be exacerbated by antipsychotic agents routinely prescribed for persons with schizophrenia. During the acute phases, schizophrenia may cause patients to misinterpret or deny symptoms of illness. Patients who are socially withdrawn may be reluctant to seek medical care. If they do seek care, physicians may sometimes find it difficult to evaluate these patients appropriately because of their communication and cognitive difficulties. Poor health habits-including smoking, physical inactivity, and an unhealthful diet-may contribute to increased morbidity and mortality. Antipsychotic medications can cause weight gain, elevated serum glucose levels, movement abnormalities, and an apathetic state that intensifies social isolation and self-neglect. In this article, we address a number of factors-including diabetes and obstacles to appropriate medical care- that increase the health burden of patients with SMI. DIABETES AND SCHIZOPHRENIA: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE As early as the 1950s and 1960 Continue reading >>

Depression And Mental Health

Depression And Mental Health

Depression is a very real condition and is becoming increasingly common in the general population; approximately one in four people will experience depression some time in their adult life. For people who live with diabetes, this figure is even higher. Up to 50% of people with diabetes are thought to also have a mental illness such as depression or anxiety. People with depression and diabetes may find it hard to maintain daily diabetes care Diabetes Australia and SANE have developed a booklet ‘The SANE Guide to Good Mental Health for people affected by diabetes’ which explains the relationship between diabetes and mental health and what you can do to look after yourself Depression is not just low mood but a serious illness. People with depression find it hard to do normal activities and function from day to day. Depression has serious effects on physical as well as mental health. Research shows that having diabetes more than doubles the risk of developing depression. Living with a chronic condition like diabetes, coping with biological and hormonal factors plus needing to manage the condition on a daily basis may increase the risk of depression. Depression can increase the likelihood of developing diabetes complications. People with depression may find it harder to deal with everyday tasks. Over time, managing diabetes (regular blood glucose testing, taking medication, following a healthy eating plan and regular physical activity) can take its toll. This may increase a person’s risk of depression, which may in turn lead to their usual diabetes care being neglected. A person may be depressed if for more than two weeks they have: Felt sad, down or miserable most of the time OR Lost interest or pleasure in most of their usual activities and Experienced symptoms in at Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Patterns of co-occurrence of diabetes and psychiatric disorders Comorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections [Box 1]. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders interact in other ways as well. Certain substances of abuse such as tobacco and alcohol can alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral hypoglycemic agents. Moreover, the presence of a comorbid psychiatric disorder like depression could interfere with the management of diabetes by influencing treatment adherence. Similarly certain disorders such as phobia of needles and injections can present difficulties with investigations and treatment processes such as blood glucose testing and insulin injection. Also patients with psychiatric disorders are less likely to seek treatment. Such delays would postpone detection Continue reading >>

5 Questions About Type 1 Diabetes And Mental Health Answered

5 Questions About Type 1 Diabetes And Mental Health Answered

5 Questions About Type 1 Diabetes and Mental Health Answered We interview Dr. Beverly Adler about her work tending to the mental health needs of the diabetes community. Dr. Beverly Adler (aka Dr. Bev, right) is an award-winning certified diabetes educator and diabetes psychologist. She has combined her first-hand knowledge of living with Type 1 diabetes with a PhD in clinical psychology to serve the mental health needs of those within the diabetes community. Shes also written two self-help books and many articles, and does speaking engagements. We caught up with her via email to ask her a few questions about mental health care for people with Type 1 diabetes. What has been your experience, as a mental health professional, working with people with diabetes? When I see patients who are newly diagnosed, they are generally stressed and feel overwhelmed with all the information which they have to learn. I try to help them reduce their anxiety levels. Many people with diabetes are in denial and dismiss the seriousness of living with this chronic illness. I think they so fear the possibility of serious complications in the future that they hide their heads in the sand like an ostrich. Some people are so angry about their diagnosis that they have a hard time managing a self-care regimen. My goal with everybody is to help them accept their diabetes. I think it helps them to know that I also live with diabetes and can be a role model for them. Our goal is to do the best that we can which does not mean being perfect, since there is no such thing. How would you recommend a person with Type 1 diabetes cope with stress, specifically pertaining to living with this chronic condition? This is advice I follow myself: Take one day at a time. Worrying about the future when you live with a Continue reading >>

Mental Health In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Results From A Large Population-based Study

Mental Health In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Results From A Large Population-based Study

Mental health in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: results from a large population-based study Sivertsen et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2014 Diabetes has previously been linked to mental health problems in adolescents, but more recent studies have yielded mixed findings. The aim of the current study was to compare symptoms of mental health problems, sleep and eating disturbances in adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in a population based sample. Data were taken from the [email protected] study, a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012. In all, 9883 adolescents aged 1619 years (53% girls) provided self-reported data on both diabetes and a range of instruments assessing mental health symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention, perfectionism, resilience, sleep problems and eating behaviour. 40 adolescents were classified as having Type 1 diabetes (prevalence 0.4%). We found that adolescents with Type 1 diabetes did not differ from their peers on any of the mental health measures. This is one of the first population-based studies to examine mental health of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. There was no evidence of increased psychopathology across a wide range of mental health measures. These findings contradict previous studies, and suggest that Type 1 diabetes is not associated with an increased risk of psychosocial problems. Type 1 diabetesMental healthEating disturbancesSleepCorrelatesEpidemiology Type 1 diabetes in adolescence has previously been linked to a range of psychosocial problems [ 1 3 ]. In a review from 2009, Kakleas and colleagues concluded that Type 1 diabetes in adolescents was associated with increased risk of developing psychiatric Continue reading >>

Three In Five People With Diabetes Experience Emotional Or Mental Health Problems

Three In Five People With Diabetes Experience Emotional Or Mental Health Problems

Three in five people with diabetes experience emotional or mental health problems Three in five people with diabetes experience emotional or mental health problems New research from Diabetes UK finds that one in five people living with diabetes uses counselling from a trained professional to help them manage their diabetes. In one of the largest surveys carried out by Diabetes UK, 8,500 people of different ages, ethnicities and backgrounds from across the UK shared their experiences living with diabetes today, and what their hopes and fears were for the future. Participants told us that diabetes affects their emotional wellbeing, with three in five (64 per cent) saying that they often or sometimes feel down because of their diabetes. One in three (33 per cent) said that diabetes got in the way of them or a family member doing things they wanted to do. Alarmingly only three in ten (30 per cent) said they definitely felt in control of their diabetes. Findings from our Future of Diabetes report. We also found out that that 19 per cent of respondents had used support or counselling from a trained professional to help them manage their diabetes, and nearly a third (32 per cent) had at some point relied on self-help materials including books, videos and resources found online. The results of this research are included in our Future of Diabetes report , which is launching at an event today in Parliament to mark World Diabetes Day (14 November). We are urging the Government to radically improve health outcomes for people with diabetes by committing to sustain transformation funding at current levels of 44 million, until at least 2021. Speaking about this ground-breaking report, Chris Askew, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK,said: Diabetes affects more than 4.5 million people in t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

My Site - Chapter 18: Diabetes And Mental Health

My Site - Chapter 18: Diabetes And Mental Health

Psychiatric disorders, particularly major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder and eating disorders, are more prevalent in people with diabetes compared to the general population. People diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, such as MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, have a higher risk of developing diabetes than the general population. All individuals with diabetes should be regularly screened for the presence of depressive and anxious symptoms. Compared to those with diabetes only, individuals with diabetes and mental health disorders have decreased medication adherence, decreased compliance with diabetes self-care, increased functional impairment, increased risk of complications associated with diabetes, increased healthcare costs and an increased risk of early mortality. The following treatment modalities should be incorporated into primary care and self-management education interventions to facilitate adaptation to diabetes, reduce diabetes-related distress and improve outcomes: motivational interventions, stress management strategies, coping skills training, family therapy and collaborative case management. Individuals taking psychiatric medications, particularly atypical antipsychotics, benefit from regular screening of metabolic parameters. Research is increasingly demonstrating a relationship between mental health disorders and diabetes. Patients with serious mental illnesses, particularly those with depressive symptoms or syndromes, and patients with diabetes share reciprocal susceptibility and a high degree of comorbidity ( Figure 1 ). The mechanisms behind these relationships are multifactorial. Some evidence shows that treatment for mental health disorders may actually increase the risk of diabetes, particularly when second-gene Continue reading >>

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