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Diabetes And Memory Loss

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Diabetes does cause memory loss. It may not be a progressive process that is clinical Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can happen related to the acute symptoms of diabetes. Interestingly, Alzheimer’s disease has been called “Type 3 Diabetes” or “Alzheimer ’s disease of the Brain” lately. In this article, we will look at how your diabetes affects memory and when and why this happens. To do this, we need to understand the four different types of memory loss. Also, looking at the symptoms and causes of memory loss will be helpful as we seek to learn how our Type 2 Diabetes may affect our memory. To further break it down, we will look at the two types of memory loss that results from Type 2 Diabetes, short and long-term memory loss. Types of memory loss or amnesia There are four different types of memory loss. The two that are most common, and that you may have heard of, are short-term memory loss and long-term memory loss. The other two types of memory loss, sensory memory loss and working memory loss, may not be as well-known. However, they are important to the preservation of human memory, thought and cognitive processes. As with many parts of the human body, memory loss is a complex issue. It involves many different factors, of which Type 2 Diabetes is one. Short-term memory loss The first sign of cognitive decline and one of the first symptoms of memory loss is short-term memory loss. I see this with my mother, when she doesn’t remember my dog’s name, or anything about the story that I just told her related to when I got him, how old he is, and all those details about pets that people may ask. Forgetting where they placed everyday objects, or forgetting what they went into a room to get can become an everyday occurrence. A set of keys becomes m Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'Significantly Reversed Memory Loss' in Mice With Alzheimer's A drug developed for type 2 diabetes has " significantly reversed memory loss " in mice with Alzheimer's disease, and researchers now want to test it on humans. The treatment is exciting for scientists because it works by protecting the brain cells attacked by Alzheimer's disease in three separate ways, rather than relying on a single approach. And seeing as the drug has already been tested and approved for use in humans, it's something that could hit the market a lot faster than other experimental treatment options. The results have only been seen in mice so far, but the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," said senior author ChristianHlscher of Lancaster University in the UK. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," said Doug Brown from UK organisation, Alzheimer's Society. "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Previous research had already established a link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's - type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's, and it also appears to make the disease progress more rapidly. This could be a result of insulin not getting to the cells properly - insulin is a growth factor which is known to protect brain cells, and insulin resistance has been observed in Alzheimer's disease brains, as well as being the biological mechanism behind type 2 diabetes. So researchers have been investigating wh Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Memory Loss

The Link Between Diabetes And Memory Loss

The Link Between Diabetes and Memory Loss November 13, 2018 | Fisher-Titus Healthy Living Team While the link is not fully understood yet, emerging research shows that people with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk of developing Alzheimers disease, as well as other forms of dementia. In fact, type 3 diabetes is a term often used to describe people who have type 2 diabetes and are also diagnosed with Alzheimer's or dementia. With November being National Diabetes Month, lets take a look at what we know about how diabetes affects memory loss. One theory is that diabetes causes blood sugar to accumulate in the brain, which damages cells. Another theory is that high levels of circulating insulin damage the brain, causing memory problems. Its also thought that blood vessel damage in the brain, brought on by diabetes, contributes to mental decline. Whatever the cause, there is a growing amount of proof that diabetes and Alzheimers are linked in some fashion. In fact, according to recent studies, people with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to develop Alzheimers as those without diabetes. While that may sound scary, the good news is that type 2 diabetes, unlike type 1 diabetes, can often be prevented. And if you already have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it can be managed, reducing complications that can come with diabetes. Here are a few things you can do to decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and long-term cognitive problems. Get moving. American Diabetes Association-funded research found that aerobic exercise leads to reductions in the levels of a protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (fluid found in the brain and spinal column), called tau protein, that is typically linked to Alzheimer's disease in older people. Know your numbers. One-third of America Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. VIDEO:A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action.This is the first... view more A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with exist Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Pre-diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes, Pre-diabetes And Memory Loss

People get diabetes when their blood glucose level, sometimes called blood sugar, is too high. Diabetes can lead to dangerous health problems, such as having a heart attack or stroke. The good news is that there are things you can do to take control of diabetes and prevent its problems. And, if you are worried about getting diabetes, there are things you can do to lower your risk. What Is Diabetes? Our bodies change the food we eat into glucose. Insulin helps glucose get into our cells where it can be used to make energy. If you have diabetes, your body may not make enough insulin, may not use insulin in the right way, or both. That may cause too much glucose in the blood. Your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in taking care of people with diabetes, called an endocrinologist. Types Of Diabetes There are two kinds of diabetes that can happen at any age. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. This type of diabetes develops most often in children and young adults. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but doesn’t use it the right way. It is the most common kind of diabetes. You may have heard it called adult-onset diabetes. Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes is higher if you are overweight, inactive, or have a family history of diabetes. Diabetes can affect many parts of your body. It’s important to keep type 2 diabetes under control. People with type 2 diabetes have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Pre-diabetes Many people have “pre-diabetes”; this means their glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an important warning signal because people with pre-diabetes are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. People who are pre-diabetic are asked to w Continue reading >>

Medical Xpress: Diabetes Protein Linked To Memory Loss

Medical Xpress: Diabetes Protein Linked To Memory Loss

Researchers in China and the UK have found that the level of a protein, HbA1c, commonly used to assess if someone has diabetes is linked to worsening memory and thinking performance in healthy ageing adults. The findings are published today in the scientific journal Diabetologia. Dr. David Reynolds, Chief Scientific Officer at Alzheimer's Research UK, said: "Though there is a well-established relationship between diabetes and an increased risk of dementia, this research focused on the impact of higher average blood sugar levels on memory and thinking decline in healthy older people. One strength of this large study is that it followed people over time to show a faster decline in memory and thinking in those with poorer blood sugar control, but it does not shed any light on the potential mechanisms underlying this decline ." "With an estimated 7 million people in the UK living with prediabetes, understanding the long-term impact on the brain is important, as well as the best approaches to manage this risk. It's important to remember that diabetes is one risk factor for Alzheimer's, the disease is caused by a complex mix of age, genetics and lifestyle factors. Current evidence suggests that not smoking, keeping blood pressure and cholesterol in check, eating a balanced diet , drinking in moderation and staying mentally and physically active call all help to maintain brain health as we age." Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

In 2012, 9.3 percent of people in the United States had diabetes. That means that about 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. This number is growing. Every year, doctors diagnose an estimated 1.4 million new cases in the United States. Diabetes is a disease that involves having higher-than-normal blood glucose levels. This is known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia occurs when your body can’t produce or respond to insulin. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Because of the reduced insulin production or resistance to the hormone, blood sugar levels tend to be high. Type 1 diabetes This is also known as juvenile diabetes. An autoimmune process may cause type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body’s antibodies attack the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. You need insulin to help glucose molecules enter the cells. Once glucose enters the cells, your body can use it to create energy. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce adequate amounts of insulin. This leads to higher than normal levels of blood sugar. Insulin injections are a necessary part of life for people living with type 1 diabetes. As of 2012, approximately 1.25 million Americans had type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes worldwide. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body produces insulin, but it can’t use it in the way that it should. This resistance causes the pancreas to produce more insulin. The added insulin increases the hormone levels in the bloodstream. This can have long-term negative effects on the brain. Check out: Diabetes by the numbers: Facts, statistics, and you » Memory loss is a normal phenomenon of aging. There are differences between memory loss that occurs with age and the complex memory Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Copyright © Mark Beselt Diabetes is an incurable disease characterized by high blood glucose levels. This is the result of the body's inability to produce or use insulin. One of the complications of diabetes is short term memory loss - and in this article we'll look at the different variations of the disease and how each type can be a cause of memory loss. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases which affects nearly 24 million (8%) of the US population. The condition is is categorized into three different forms: Type 1 Diabetes is a genetic defect usually diagnosed in children and young adults. It arises from the inability to produce the hormone insulin, which is needed every time you eat to convert sugar and starches into energy. People with Type 1 diabetes usually need to inject insulin into their bodies and constantly be aware of their blood sugar levels. Fortunately, this most extreme form of diabetes only affects 5-10% of all sufferers but with no cure is does remain a lifelong condition. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and millions of Americans have been diagnosed, although many more are at high risk. This condition is often diagnosed later in life when the body can no longer produce enough insulin, or the cells begin to ignore the insulin. Without intervention, this can lead to serious complications including heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. Gestational Diabetes is a temporary form of the disease which affects around 4% of all pregnant women at 28 weeks or later. It begins when hormones from the placenta block the action of the mother's insulin. The condition corrects itself after the birth but it is very important to maintain healthy blood sugar levels during pregnancy to avoid serious complications for both mother an Continue reading >>

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

First, the good news. People, in general, are living longer. And people who have diabetes can and do live long, healthy lives. Now, the not-so-good news: People who have diabetes are more likely to experience memory problems than people without the condition. According to a study out of the University of South Florida in Tampa, older adults who had diabetes and high blood sugars performed worse on memory tests at the start of the study and showed a greater decline in memory by the end of the study compared to older adult without diabetes. What’s behind the memory decline in diabetes? Previous studies have shown that people with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a kind of dementia that causes issues with memory, thinking, and behavior. It’s progressive and irreversible, and it eventually destroys a person’s ability to carry out even the simplest of tasks. While memory loss is a key feature of Alzheimer’s, there are differences between the memory loss that occurs with aging and memory loss due to Alzheimer’s. However, both are more likely to occur in people with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers think that damage to blood vessels, which can occur in diabetes, is what can lead to cognitive problems and vascular dementia. It’s also possible that high blood sugar levels cause damage in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that’s involved in memory. Actually, high blood sugars appear to be detrimental to brain health, in general. But even people whose diabetes is in good control are more likely to experience memory problems and impairments in cognitive function. It’s also worth noting that having too many very low blood sugars (if you’re at risk for lows) may potentially also affect your memory and cognition. The g Continue reading >>

Management Of Adults With Diabetes And Cognitive Problems

Management Of Adults With Diabetes And Cognitive Problems

Management of Adults With Diabetes and Cognitive Problems SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY Corresponding author: Rachel Hopkins, [email protected] Copyright 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Management of diabetes involves a high degree of patient involvement and daily performance of many self-care tasks. These include monitoring of blood glucose; eating healthy meals; engaging in physical activity; taking medications as directed; recognizing and managing hypoglycemia; performing proper hygiene, including foot and dental care; attending medical appointments; and understanding sick-day management ( 1 , 2 ). Pharmacological therapy, particularly when insulin is needed, can be complex. Social, physical, and mental health challenges may hinder self-care and are associated with increased diabetes complications and poor quality of life ( 3 ). Cognitive impairment is a common, underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can interfere with the ability to adequately perform required daily self-management behaviors ( Table 1 ) ( 4 ). Mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment and dementia are more frequently observed in older adults, but declines in cognitive function also have been described in younger people with diabetes ( 5 , 6 ). It is estimated that at least half of older people with diabetes will become cognitively impaired and functionally disabled ( 7 ). Deficiencies in memory capacity, attention to detail, planning, ability to reason, decision-making, and information processing speed are associated with deficits in diabetes self-care behavio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alzheimer's Linked

Diabetes And Alzheimer's Linked

Vieira MN, et al. Connecting Alzheimer's disease to diabetes: underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Neuropharmacology. 2018;136:160. Rosales-Corral S, et al. Diabetes and Alzheimer disease, two overlapping pathologies with the same background: Oxidative stress. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity. 2015;2015:985845. Infante-Garcia C, et al. Long-term central pathology and cognitive impairment are exacerbated in a mixed model of Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2016;65:15. Larson EB, et al. Risk factors for cognitive decline and dementia. Accessed Feb. 27, 2019. National diabetes statistics report, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed March 4, 2019. Biessels GJ, et al. Cognitive decline and dementia in diabetes mellitus: Mechanisms and clinical implications. Nature Reviews Endocrinology. 2018;14:591. 4 steps to manage your diabetes for life. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Accessed March 4, 2019. Dementia: Hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Accessed Feb. 28, 2019. stergaard SD, et al. Associations between potentially modifiable risk factors and Alzheimer disease: A Mendelian randomization study. PLOS Medicine. 2015;12:e1001841. Willette AA, et al. Association of insulin resistance with cerebral glucose uptake in late middle-aged adults at risk for Alzheimer disease. JAMA Neurology. 2015;72:1013. Ferreira LS, et al. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease. Frontiers in Neuroscience. 2018;12:830. De Felice FG, et al. Brain metabolic stress and neuroinflammation at the basis of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2015;7:94. Keene CD, et al. Epidemiology, pathology, and path Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Memory?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Memory?

Q&A with Elizabeth Seaquist, MD, professor of medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School's Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism. Q. How does type 2 diabetes affect memory? A. Studies show that people with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. They're also more likely to get vascular dementia -- memory loss caused by blood vessel damage and poor blood flow to the brain. And, they're at greater risk for mild cognitive impairment, memory problems that can sometimes lead to Alzheimer's disease. Yet we don't know exactly why people with diabetes are more likely to develop memory loss. We do know that diabetes damages blood vessels and increases the risk for stroke, which can make you more likely to get vascular dementia. The connection might also have to do with insulin resistance. In people with diabetes, the body doesn't respond well to the hormone insulin, which normally moves sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. Some scientists believe that people with diabetes may also have insulin resistance in their brain. We need insulin to keep our brain cells healthy, and insulin resistance could damage brain cells enough to cause memory loss. In fact, researchers are investigating whether an insulin nasal spray might help ward off dementia. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control to protect your blood vessels and prevent complications like nerve damage, kidney disease, and vision loss. Yet you don't want to overcorrect. Very low blood sugar can also harm your memory and mental function. Work with your doctor to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. You also want to stay on top of your cardiovascular disease risks, because heart and blood vessel problems can contribute to memory loss. Watch your blood pres Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Causes Brain Fog And Memory Loss: Can Anything Help

How Diabetes Causes Brain Fog And Memory Loss: Can Anything Help

How Diabetes Causes Brain Fog and Memory Loss: Can Anything Help Diabetes causes brain fog and memory loss. Both are frustrating and can drastically reduce someones ability to complete daily tasks. Brain fog isnt an official diagnosis but instead is a blanket term that aptly describes how someone is experiencing the world. As its name implies, brain fog makes people feel as though theyre enshrouded in a fog so thick they dont know how to find their way out. Diabetes is a cause of brain fog and the memory loss that often is a part of brain fog. Diabetes causes serious health problems throughout the body. The brain isnt exempt from damage, and symptoms of brain fog make the disease even more difficult to deal with. Brain fog can involve: Struggles in finding the right words in conversations Specific mechanisms of diabetes cause brain fog and memory loss. Diabetes Problems and Brain Fog Starts with Blood Sugar Diabetes begins with insulin and blood sugar. When we eat, glucose (a sugar) is created during digestion. It enters the bloodstream where its joined by a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps glucose leave the bloodstream and enter the cells for energy. Glucose is the main source of energy for the brain In diabetes, there is a problem with both glucose and insulin that leads to a host of problems. Glucose needs insulin to enter the cells, but in diabetes either the body cant make insulin, doesnt make enough, or cant use its insulin correctly. As a result, glucose remains in the bloodstream and accumulates. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) does extensive, system-wide damage. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), a result of diet and/or medication, also causes damage. These blood sugar problems impair functioning in the brain and can cause brain fog and memory loss. Blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Memory Loss Research

Diabetes And Memory Loss Research

Researchers and clinicians have found that uncontrolled diabetes may increase the risk of experiencing cognitive problems, such as memory loss. Higher than normal blood glucose (sugar) levels can damage nerve cells, supportive glial cells, and blood vessels in both peripheral nerves of the body and the brain. Research has shown that having Type 2 diabetes may double the risk of developing a slowly progressive dementia. And while there are many causes of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and stroke, it is also possible that diabetes may cause memory loss through silent damage to the capillaries (tiny blood vessels that form the network for glucose and oxygen exchange between blood vessels and tissue cells). Research has shown that having Type 2 diabetes may double the risk of developing a slowly progressive dementia. And while there are many causes of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and stroke, it is also possible that diabetes may cause memory loss through silent damage to the capillaries (tiny blood vessels that form the network for glucose and oxygen exchange between blood vessels and tissue cells). “While it is relatively easy to measure glucose and insulin in the blood, we hardly ever measure glucose and insulin in the brain. This leaves us with critical questions about how diabetes and pre-diabetes may be affecting the brain,” says Helena Chang Chui, MD, chair and professor of neurology and principal investigator of the USC Healthier Vessels, Healthier Brain Study. Her research examines how glucose and insulin may be affecting the brain, as well as how the health of blood vessels may impact memory. Dr. Chui’s research examines the causes of memory loss from a new and important research angles. She describes the complexities of researching th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Could Lead To Dementia: Prevent Memory Loss And High Blood Sugar - But How?

Diabetes Could Lead To Dementia: Prevent Memory Loss And High Blood Sugar - But How?

Diabetes could lead to dementia: So what can you do to prevent it? So memory loss could be prevented by preventing high blood sugar levels - but what can you do to ensure your blood sugar stays at a healthy level? Prevent the symptoms of dementia by preventing high blood sugar levels - but how? If you find yourself becoming easily fatigued, it can be worth trying a natural supplement. Nutritionist and fitness trainer Cassandra Barns said: CuraLin [avalable at www.curalife.co] is a specially formulated dietary supplement containing ten herbs and plant extracts traditionally used to support insulin sensitivity and help keep blood glucose under control. A word of caution, however: if youre being treated for type 2 diabetes, consult your doctor before changing your diet or exercise or starting a supplement. CuraLin can also help with the regulation and consumption of sugary foods as its natural ingredients can reduce cravings for sugars and other processed carbohydrates, as well as helping to restrict their absorption in the blood stream. Nutrition and weight loss coach Pippa Campbell said: Eating protein at each meal will help to balance blood sugars and feel full for longer. Try eating eggs for breakfast or add some protein powder to yoghurt. Nutritionist Cassandra said: Struggling to keep track of your eating habits? Try logging what you eat. This can help you monitor what food groups you may be over indulging in and can make it easier to control your portion size. It'll help you stay accountable for what you've eaten. Diabetes could lead to dementia: Prevent sugar binges with protein 7 things you should do EVERY day to stave off dementia Diabetes could lead to dementia: Swap sugar for natural alternatives You need to become a label reader to understand what is in the f Continue reading >>

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