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Diabetes And Low Heart Rate

Effects Of Low Blood Sugar On The Body

Effects Of Low Blood Sugar On The Body

The Effects of low blood sugar on the Body Every cell in your body needs sugar (glucose) to function. When your blood sugar levels drop too low, your cells become starved for energy. Initially, that can cause minor symptoms, but if you don’t get your blood sugar levels up soon, you’re at risk of serious complications. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below the normal range, it’s called hypoglycemia, or insulin shock. Low blood sugar can happen when you skip a meal. It can also happen if your pancreas releases more insulin than it should after you’ve eaten. The most common reason for low blood sugar is diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can no longer produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough, or your body can’t use it properly. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too much (hyperglycemia), you need the right amount of insulin. With insufficient insulin, your blood sugar levels rise. Too much, and your blood sugar levels can plummet. Another possible cause of low blood sugar is drinking too much alcohol, especially on an empty stomach. This can interfere with the liver’s ability to release stored glucose into your bloodstream. Hepatitis and other problems with your liver can also lead to low blood sugar. Other causes include kidney disorders, anorexia nervosa, a pancreatic tumor, or adrenal gland disorders. There are a variety of symptoms of low blood sugar, but the only way to be sure what your blood glucose levels are is by taking a blood glucose test. Generally, blood sugar levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) are considered too low, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you have diabetes, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels often. Low blood sugar can come on quickly Continue reading >>

When Is Blood Pressure Too Low

When Is Blood Pressure Too Low

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 75 million adults in the U.S. have high blood pressure. That amounts to one in every three adults. And according to the American Diabetes Association, two out of three people who have diabetes also have high blood pressure. So, understandably, a lot of attention is focused on helping people lower their blood pressure to a safe level. But what if you have blood pressure that’s too low? What does it mean? And what should you do? Low blood pressure, defined We’ve all had our blood pressure checked at the doctor’s office numerous times. The nurse or medical assistant wraps a cuff around your upper arm, pumps it up, and, as it is deflating, listens with a stethoscope. What he or she is listening for is, first, the sound when blood starts flowing as the cuff is released — that’s the systolic, or top number — and then the last sound that’s heard before blood flow returns to normal — that’s the diastolic, or bottom number. An “ideal” blood pressure reading is under 120/80 mmHg. For most people who have diabetes, the goal is less than 140/90 mmHg. All well and good, but what about low blood pressure? Low blood pressure is also called “hypotension.” Hypotension, according to the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is “abnormally low blood pressure,” and, in general, is a blood pressure that is below 90/60 mm Hg. Why is low blood pressure a concern? With all the concern around high blood pressure, or hypertension, it almost seems like the lower your blood pressure, the better. After all, high blood pressure isn’t called the “silent killer” for nothing. It’s a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke, and can also cause kidney disease, blindness, and dementia. Low Continue reading >>

Resting Heart Rate In Middle Age And Diabetes Development In Older Age

Resting Heart Rate In Middle Age And Diabetes Development In Older Age

Abstract OBJECTIVE—Based on prior research showing inverse associations between heart rate and life expectancy, we tested the hypothesis that adults with higher resting heart rate in middle age were more likely to have diagnosed diabetes or to experience diabetes mortality in older age (>65 years). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Resting heart rate was measured at baseline (1967–1973) in the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry. We used Medicare billing records to identify diabetes-related hospital claims and non–hospital-based diabetes expenses from 1992 to 2002 in 14,992 participants aged 35–64 years who were free from diabetes at baseline. Diabetes-related mortality was determined from 1984 to 2002 using National Death Index codes 250.XX (ICD-8 and -9) and E10–E14 (ICD-10). RESULTS—After age 65, 1,877 participants had diabetes-related hospital claims and 410 participants had any mention of diabetes on their death certificate. The adjusted (demographic characteristics, cigarette smoking, and years of Medicare eligibility) odds of having a diabetes-related claim was ∼10% higher (odds ratio [OR] 1.10 [95% CI 1.05–1.16]) per 12 bpm higher baseline heart rate. Following adjustment for BMI and postload glucose at baseline, the association attenuated to nonsignificance. Higher heart rate was associated with diabetes mortality in adults aged 35–49 years at baseline following adjustment for postload glucose and BMI (1.21 [1.03–1.41]). CONCLUSIONS—Higher resting heart rate is associated with diabetes claims and mortality in older age and is only due in part to BMI and concurrently measured glucose. Resting heart rate is inversely associated with life expectancy in mammals (1) and directly associated with cardiovascular and all-cause morta Continue reading >>

Heart Rate Variability In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Metaanalysis

Heart Rate Variability In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Metaanalysis

Heart rate variability in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and metaanalysis Roles Investigation, Resources, Software, Writing original draft Affiliation University Hospital of ClermontFerrand, CHU ClermontFerrand, Endocrinology, ClermontFerrand, France Affiliation University Hospital of ClermontFerrand, CHU ClermontFerrand, Clinical Research Direction, ClermontFerrand, France Roles Validation, Visualization, Writing review & editing Affiliations Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LPNC & CNRS, LPNC, Grenoble, France, Institut Universitaire de France, Paris, France Roles Validation, Visualization, Writing review & editing Affiliation Universit Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, GReD, Inserm, University Hospital of ClermontFerrand, CHU ClermontFerrand, Endocrinology, ClermontFerrand, France Roles Conceptualization, Validation, Visualization, Writing review & editing Affiliation Peking University, Culture and Social Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Beijing, China Roles Conceptualization, Validation, Visualization, Writing review & editing Affiliation Universit Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, GReD, Inserm, University Hospital of ClermontFerrand, CHU ClermontFerrand, Endocrinology, ClermontFerrand, France Affiliations Universit Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, LaPSCo, Physiological and Psychosocial Stress, University Hospital of ClermontFerrand, CHU ClermontFerrand, Preventive and Occupational Medicine, WittyFit, ClermontFerrand, France, Australian Catholic University, Faculty of Health, School of Exercise Science, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Continue reading >>

For A Better Workout, Target Your Heart Rate

For A Better Workout, Target Your Heart Rate

For a Better Workout, Target Your Heart Rate Have you ever stopped to wonder, mid-hike or jog or bike ride, exactly how hard you're exercising? I mean, sure, you know how you're feeling: Breathing heavily? Check. Breaking a sweat and having difficulty talking? Check, check. But in order to definitively measure your activity level, consider tracking your heart rate. "It's an extremely useful tool, especially for people just starting out," says Scott Crouter, PhD, an assistant professor of exercise and health sciences at the University of MassachusettsBoston. "You'll have an actual number to place on how hard you're working, which allows you to see if you're in a range where you're getting moderate activity, or maybe working too hard and need to slow down a little." What he's talking about is target heart rate training: calculating your maximum heart rate and then using that number to figure out how vigorously you need to exercise to make your heart beat in a "target zone," to ensure a moderate or more intense workout. It can help you gauge your initial fitness level and then set goals and monitor progress in nearly any fitness program, from walking and running to playing tennis or even swimming. "You can use it as kind of a tracking guide," says Crouter, "a mental diary you can record every day that helps hold you accountable, by asking, 'Am I working hard enough? What exactly did I do today, and did I do enough?' " Why is it important to know how strenuously you're exercising? For starters, upping the intensity of a workout can lead to maximum health and fitness benefits, especially for people with diabetes, says Sheri Colberg, a professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., and author of The Diabetic Athlete's Handbook. "Doing more intense Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar? 8 Warning Signs If You Have Diabetes

Low Blood Sugar? 8 Warning Signs If You Have Diabetes

Do you know the No. 1 cause of blood sugar dips? Changes in food intake. You may go too long without eating carbohydrates, or step up your activity without adding extra food. Certain diabetes medications, such as insulin, can cause low blood sugar as well.  Either way, these situations can cause hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy And it’s sometimes difficult to tell for sure when you’re experiencing problems. Symptoms may vary from person to person; not everyone has the same warning signs. The problems are sometimes mild, but if they’re severe and left untreated, they could lead to seizures or unconsciousness. Here’s what you need to know to recognize hypoglycemia when it happens — as well as steps you can take to help avoid the problem. What are the most common signs of trouble? Health professionals typically define hypoglycemia as blood sugar in a non-pregnant adult that is lower than 70mg/dl. However, experts don’t define the severity by the number, but rather by the symptoms: Mild. In this case, low blood sugar can be treated by the person with diabetes alone. Moderate. The person experiencing low blood sugar is alert enough to ask for help, but he or she does require assistance. Severe. This person is completely unable to self-treat and may be awake or unconscious.  Talk to your doctor to see what target levels are safe for you. If you suspect you’re dealing with hypoglycemia, here are the most common symptoms to watch for: Sweating– One of the first signs of hypoglycemia is sweating or clammy skin. It often occurs regardless of the temperature outside. Hunger – Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Topic Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. Mild high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than your target range (usually 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL in adults and 200 mg/dL to 240 mg/dL in children), you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people who have diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Weight loss. Fatigue. Increased appetite. Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: A dry mouth and increased thirst. Warm, dry skin. Moderate to severe high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Blurred vision. Extreme thirst. Lightheadedness. Flushed, hot, dry skin. Restlessness, drowsiness, or difficulty waking up. If your body produces little or no insulin (people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes), you also may have: Rapid, deep breathing. A fast heart rate and a weak pulse. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and/or vomiting. If your Continue reading >>

Heart Rate Variability In Diabetic Children: Sensitivity Of The Time- And Frequency-domain Methods

Heart Rate Variability In Diabetic Children: Sensitivity Of The Time- And Frequency-domain Methods

, Volume 14, Issue3 , pp 140146 | Cite as Heart rate variability in diabetic children: Sensitivity of the time- and frequency-domain methods Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive index of the neural activity of the heart. Although also influenced by the sympathetic activity of the heart, HRV is essentially determined by the vagal stimulation of the heart. Several HRV abnormalities have been described in adults with diabetes mellitus. However, there are few data on HRV in children with diabetes mellitus. In the present study, HRV was assessed in seven healthy children, 10 diabetic children with good glycemic control and 11 diabetic children with poor glycemic control. All had normal standard cardiac autonomic function tests, obtained from 24-h Holter tapes. HRV was measured by calculating six time-domain (mean R-R interval (RR), standard deviation of the R-R interval [SDRR], standard deviation of the mean of 288 R-R intervals [SDANN], the mean of the 288 standard deviations computed for each 5-min period [SD], percentage of differences of adjacent R-R intervals of >50 msec for the entire 24 h [pNN50], and the root mean square of successive differences [rMSSD]) and four frequency-domain (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], total heart rate power spectra, and LF/HF ratio) indexes. SD, pNN50, rMSSD, LF, HF and total heart rate power spectra were markedly and significantly reduced in diabetic children with poor metabolic control. The 24-h variation of low- and high-frequency components of heart rate power spectra of the latter children had a differet shape. Thus, diabetic children with poor metabolic control (elevated HbA1c and B2M levels) have a low HRV compared to those diabetic children with good control and healthy chidren. These results can be interpreted Continue reading >>

Target Heart Rate Calculator

Target Heart Rate Calculator

Tweet Calculate your target heart rate and maximum heart rate based on your age and fitness with the heart rate calculator.Simply enter your age and specify your level of fitness to calculate your target heart rate. Maximum heart rate is calculated by the equation: 217 - (age * 0.85) [from Miller et al; 1993] Target heart rate allows you to determine the heart rate target you should set for an effective cardiovascular workout. Physical activity and exercise is encouraged to help lower the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Most cardiovascular gym equipment will have sensors to measure your heart rate. If not, you can measure your pulse with a heart rate monitor. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children an Continue reading >>

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

www.CardioSmart.org Hyperglycemia means your blood sugar is too high. It can happen if you miss your diabetes medicine, do not eat healthy foods, or do not exercise. Illness, stress, and hormones can also cause your blood sugar to rise. In some people, it occurs for no apparent reason. If you have type 2 diabetes, it may take days for your blood sugar to rise too high. With type 1 diabetes, it may happen faster. By checking your blood sugar, youmay be able to prevent this and avoid an emergency. Signs of high blood sugar You may havemild high blood sugar if you: • Feel very thirsty and urinate more. • Have warm, dry skin. You may havemoderate high blood sugar if you: • Breathe fast and deeply. • Have a fruity breath odor. • Have belly pain, poor appetite, or vomiting. • Are dizzy or weak. • Urinate less. • Have blurred vision that slowly gets worse. • Feel drowsy and have trouble waking up. You may have severe high blood sugar if you: • Have a rapid heart rate and a weak pulse. • Have rapid, deep breathing with a strong, fruity breath odor. • Feel very sleepy and weak. • Fainted or passed out. How to prevent high blood sugar • Post a list of symptoms where you can see it often. Make sure others know the symptoms and what to do in case of an emergency. • Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or are not doing your normal routine. • Teach others at work and at home how to check your blood sugar. • Have a medical alert bracelet or other medical identification with you at all times. • Develop a plan. Talk with your doctor about howmuch insulin to take, depending on your blood sugar level. • Take your medicines as prescribed. Do not skip your di Continue reading >>

Low Heart Rate Variability Is A Risk Factor For Sudden Cardiac Death In Type 2 Diabetes.

Low Heart Rate Variability Is A Risk Factor For Sudden Cardiac Death In Type 2 Diabetes.

Low heart rate variability is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death in type 2 diabetes. Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council Health Management and Promotion Center, 3-8-6 Sendamachi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0052, Japan. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart rate variability (HRV) in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether low HRV can predict SCD in type 2 diabetes. Subjects were 8917 consecutively examined persons (3089 diabetic, and 5828 nondiabetic subjects) aged 35-69 years who underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) together with electrocardiography (ECG). HRV was calculated from the 12-lead ECG as the coefficient of variance for 100 R-R intervals (CV(R-R)). During a median observation period of 5.2 years, SCD occurred in 56 subjects (33 diabetic, and 23 nondiabetic). Among diabetic subjects, mortality from SCD tended to be higher in subjects with a low CV(R-R) (P=0.004). After adjustment for age, gender, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), BMI, ischemic ECG change, and smoking history, relative risk (RR) of SCD was 2.07 (95% CI 1.02-4.17) in diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% compared with those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2%. Diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% had significantly higher cumulative mortality from SCD than those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2% (P=0.007). In type 2 diabetes, a low CV(R-R) carried an increased risk of SCD. Continue reading >>

Bradycardia | Slow Heart Rate

Bradycardia | Slow Heart Rate

Bradycardia = too slow A heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute (BPM) in adults is called bradycardia. What's too slow for you may depend on your age and physical condition. Physically active adults (and athletes) often have a resting heart rate slower than 60 BPM but it doesn't cause problems and is normal for them. Your heart rate may fall below 60 BPM during deep sleep. Elderly people are more prone to problems with a slow heart rate. View an animation of bradycardia. Causes of bradycardia Problems with the sinoatrial (SA) node, sometimes called the heart's natural pacemaker Problems in the conduction pathways of the heart (electrical impulses are not conducted from the atria to the ventricles) Metabolic problems such as hypothyroidism (people with low thyroid hormone) Damage to the heart from heart attack or heart disease (myocardial infarction or MI) Symptoms of bradycardia A heart rhythm that's too slow can cause insufficient blood flow to the brain with symptoms such as: Fatigue or feeling tired or weak Dizziness or lightheadedness Confusion Fainting or near-fainting spells Some people may feel short of breathe Feeling like it's hard to exercise In extreme cases, cardiac arrest may occur. Complications of bradycardia Severe, prolonged untreated bradycardia can cause: Heart failure Syncope (loss of consciousness; fainting) Angina pectoris (chest pain) Low blood pressure or hypotension High blood pressure or hypertension Treatment of the underlying medical cause Not usually needed except with prolonged or repeated symptoms Can usually be corrected with an artificial pacemaker to speed up the heart rhythm as needed Some medications can cause a slow heartbeat, in this case, medication may be adjusted. This content was last reviewed September 2016. Continue reading >>

Mhealth Wearables, Ai Used To Detect Diabetes In Ones Heart Rate

Mhealth Wearables, Ai Used To Detect Diabetes In Ones Heart Rate

mHealth Wearables, AI Used to Detect Diabetes in Ones Heart Rate A new study out of UCSF uses an AI platform integrated with popular mHealth wearables like the Apple Watch and Android Wear to detect diabetes in one's heart rate and step counts. -A new study launched at the University of California in San Francisco has found that mHealth wearables integrated with an AI platform can detect early signs of diabetes. UCSF researchers used a deep neural network developed by a Silicon Valley startup called Cardiogram to analyze a users heart rate and step counts through sensors commonly found in the Apple Watch, Android Wear and mHealth devices developed by Fitbit, Garmin and other companies. The researchers were reportedly 85 percent successful in identifying people with prediabetes. While there have been many attempts to build special-purpose glucose-sensing hardware to detect diabetes, this is the first large-scale study showing that ordinary heart rate sensors - when paired with an artificial intelligence-based algorithm - can identify early signs of diabetes, Cardiogram co-founder Brandon Ballinger said in a press release . By detecting diabetes earlier, we can help people live longer and healthier lives. An mHealth Wearable Helps Cedars-Sinai Doctors Manage Patient Care The study aims to address the more than 100 million Americans now living with diabetes or trending toward that chronic condition , in particular the 25 percent of people with undiagnosed diabetes and the 88 percent of people with prediabetes who dont realize they have it. mHealth and telehealth advocates have long sought to use technology to identify those people and put them on a healthier path before they either develop diabetes or experience adverse health outcomes because of poor health management. I Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar & Heartbeat In People With Diabetes

Low Blood Sugar & Heartbeat In People With Diabetes

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Low blood sugar levels -- known as hypoglycemia -- in people with diabetes may cause potentially dangerous changes in heart rate, according to a small new study. This study's findings may help explain why a large-scale study found that very tight control of blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes led to higher-than-expected death rates. It may also help explain why some otherwise healthy people with type 1 diabetes die during their sleep -- sometimes called "dead-in-bed syndrome" -- without an apparent cause, researchers say. you might like "We found that hypoglycemia was fairly common and that nocturnal episodes in particular were generally marked by a pattern whereby glucose levels dropped to low levels for some hours during which patients slept," said Dr. Simon Heller, senior study author and a professor of clinical diabetes and honorary consultant physician at the University of Sheffield, in England. "These periods of hypoglycemia were associated with a high risk of marked slow heart rates [bradycardia] accompanied by [abnormal] beats. We have therefore identified a mechanism which might contribute to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk during intensive insulin therapy," Heller said. Low blood sugar levels are not uncommon in people with diabetes, a disease that can produce dangerously high blood sugar levels. That's because the very treatments that can help prevent high blood sugar levels -- and the serious complications that accompany long-term high blood sugar levels -- can cause blood sugar levels to drop too low. Although some oral diabetes medications can cause low blood sugar levels, the most common treatment to drop blood sugar levels too Continue reading >>

Wearable Heart Rate Monitor Could Signal Low Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes

Wearable Heart Rate Monitor Could Signal Low Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes

Wearable heart rate monitor could signal low blood sugar in type 1 diabetes Wearable heart rate monitor could signal low blood sugar in type 1 diabetes Associate Director, Communications and Media Relations Chicago, IL - A wearable medical patch measuring the beat-to-beat variation in heart rate is a promising device for the early detection of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, in type 1 diabetes, according to the researchers who tested the new monitor. Results of their preliminary study will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Societys 100th annual meeting in Chicago. Hypoglycemia is common in children and adults with type 1 diabetes. When untreated, severe hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, loss of consciousness or even death. Sometimes people with diabetes do not recognize symptoms of low blood sugar, a problem called impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. Although wearing a continuous glucose meter can help identify hypoglycemia, the glucose sensor, inserted under the skin, typically has a delay. This delay can compromise the accuracy of measuring low glucose values, said the studys principal investigator, Marleen Olde Bekkink, M.D., Ph.D., an endocrinology fellow at Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen, Netherlands. People with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia may need to wear an additional monitor. Past research found that hypoglycemia speeds ones heart rate and alters heart rate variability, which is the normal beat-to-beat variation in heartbeats. Olde Bekkink and her colleagues tested the feasibility detecting hypoglycemia using a commercially available biosensor called the HealthPatch (from VitalConnect, San Jose, Calif.) that measures heart rate and a single-lead electrocardiogram, or ECG. The patch continuously measured the heart rate o Continue reading >>

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