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Diabetes And Low Creatinine Levels

What Do Low Creatinine Levels Mean?

What Do Low Creatinine Levels Mean?

What does it mean for me if I have low creatinine levels? Creatinine is a substance that is produced during the body's natural activity (metabolism). It is usually excreted (got rid of) from the body through the kidneys. If the kidneys start to become diseased, for whatever reason, the level of creatinine rises in the blood stream. It is the level in the blood stream that is usually measured in renal function tests and I presume that it is this level that you are referring to. The normal level of creatinine is usually 60 to 110 micromoles per litre, but the exact figures can vary from lab to lab. Having a low level of blood creatinine indicates nothing more than an efficient and effective pair of kidneys. A further test of kidney function is to collect all the urine passed over a period of twenty-four hours and then to compare the amount of creatinine in the blood to the level in the blood stream (creatinine clearance test). This can look at the efficiency of the kidneys and is only usually done if there is an indication of a problem with renal function. In normally functioning kidneys, the level of creatinine in the urine compared to the blood should be high as it is being passed out efficiently. Conversely, if the level in the urine is low, with a high blood creatinine level, this in an indication of a problem, for which a consultant physician is usually involved. I hope that this information helps you understand the significance of a low creatinine level. Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Other Qs & As Last updated 31.08.2014 Continue reading >>

How To Lower High Creatinine Level For Diabetics

How To Lower High Creatinine Level For Diabetics

As we know, if patients have many years of diabetes, they will find that their creatinine level is elevated. So is creatinine level linked with diabetes to some extent? How to lower high creatinine level for diabetics? Many people must be full of curiousness to the two questions. The following may give you answers. In order to find solutions to these questions, we must first know the exact reasons of elevated creatinine level. What causes high creatinine level for diabetics? 1 Reducing the amount of water intake may lead to high blood concentration and the less blood flow in the renal disease. As a result, the creatinine level will rise. Under the circumstances, supplying enough water timely is able to help reduce high creatinine level. 2 Sometimes when diabetics do a lot of exercise or don’t have enough sleep, their creatinine level will become higher than the normal. In this situation, people needn’t worry, because when you get enough rest, the creatinine level will become normally. 3 If diabetics have many years of high blood pressure which is controlled badly, moderate or heavy proteinuria will occur. Over time, it will damage kidney and creatinine level will increase gradually. 4 Finally, diabetes in the long time may damage the kidney function. When more than 50percent of kidney function is impaired, creatinine level will increase. Now, you must know the courses of high creatinine level for diabetics, so how to lower high creatinine level for diabetics becomes more and more important. High creatinine level caused by the former two factors is usually temporary, so we can lower it by changing lifestyle. However, it is difficult to lower high creatinine level caused by the later two factors, because in this situation, elevated creatinine level is caused by impair Continue reading >>

Creatinine

Creatinine

A by-product of normal muscle breakdown. Measuring the levels of creatinine in the bloodstream and in the urine can be helpful for tracking the progression of diabetic kidney disease. Diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease) caused by high blood glucose levels and high blood pressure, is the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. Kidney failure develops within 10 years in 50% of people with Type 1 diabetes and overt kidney disease. In people with Type 2 diabetes and overt kidney disease, 20% progress to kidney failure in 20 years. Fortunately, taking a number of steps, such as controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure, can reduce the risk of kidney failure. It’s also important to catch diabetic nephropathy as early as possible. One of the best screening tools for the earliest stages of diabetic nephropathy is the microalbuminuria test. Once the kidneys become damaged, tiny amounts of protein leak into the urine, a condition known as microalbuminuria. Currently, the American Diabetes Association recommends starting to screen for microalbuminuria in people who have had Type 1 diabetes for five years and at the time of diagnosis in people with Type 2 diabetes (since Type 2 diabetes may have been developing and causing problems long before it was diagnosed). All people with diabetes should be screened annually thereafter (or within six months if a test result is positive for microalbuminuria). While microalbuminuria is a very sensitive test in people with Type 1 diabetes, testing for microalbuminuria alone may miss many cases of diabetic kidney disease in those with Type 2. For that reason, some kidney experts now recommend also testing the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) annually in people with Type 2 diabetes. GFR is a measure of how well the kidn Continue reading >>

How To Bring Down High Creatinine Levels

How To Bring Down High Creatinine Levels

Expert Reviewed Six Methods:Understanding CreatinineUsing Unverified Herbal RemediesMaking Lifestyle ChangesTaking MedicationsConsidering Medical TherapiesMaking Diet ChangesCommunity Q&A Creatinine is a waste product found in everyone's blood and urine. Creatinine and creatinine clearance tests tell how well your kidneys are working. Under normal circumstances, your kidneys should be able to filter and pass this substance out of your body. Certain health problems can hinder this function, however, allowing harmful amounts of creatinine to build up. There are several ways that you can reduce your creatinine levels, including changing your diet, making some lifestyle modifications, taking medications, and participating in medical therapy. 1 Know what creatinine is. Creatinine is a waste product produced by the body when creatine, a metabolism substance that helps convert food into energy, breaks down.[1] Usually, your kidneys help filter creatinine out of the blood. The waste product is then passed out of the body via urine. High creatinine levels can indicate a problem with your kidneys. High creatinine levels can be the result of regularly consuming a high amount of protein or partaking in strenuous exercise. Creatine supplements may also increase levels of creatinine in blood and urine. 2 Understand how the test works. A creatinine test measures how much creatinine is in your blood. Your doctor may also perform a creatinine clearance test, which measures the amount of creatinine in your urine. The amount in your blood should be low, and the amount in your urine should be high. These tests only provide a "snapshot" of your kidney health. They only measure the amount of creatinine in your blood and urine from one-time samples taken within the past 24 hours. 3 Interpret Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Diabetes And Creatinine Level?

What Is The Relationship Between Diabetes And Creatinine Level?

Answered by: Prof Dinesh Dhanwal | Prof of Medicine and Head of Endocrinology, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi Q: What is the relation between diabetes and creatinine? My mother was diagnosed with kidney problem and infection in her urine/blood. A nephrologist cleared out the infection she had but by that time her creatinine level had gone up to 8. The doctor prescribed Endoxin and Wysolone medication. After that her haemoglobin and white cells went beyond the range. In 2 subsequent visits doctor checked her creatinine which was found to be 4.9 & 5. Her sugar was found to be 536 and the doctor said that this was because of Wysolone hence he reduced the dose from 25 to 15 mg. After that her sugar levels came down to 430. Recently the doctor advised her to take insulin with 4,4,4 units daily (3 times) to maintain her sugar levels & asked her to go on a strict diet. When we measured it after 3 days after stating insulin, her sugar level came down to 230. We consulted our doctor so he increased the insulin dose as 6,4,4. Her creatinine level still varies between 4.5 to 4.9. I need your opinion about the same. Can her creatinine & glucose levels come down to normal in future with the current medication & diet? Will she face any other problem/complications in future and what precautions should we take to avoid further complications? My mother is 56 years old and weighs 66kgs. She has high blood pressure since 10 years and is taking ATANOL-50. A:Issues to be addressed in query are 1) Wysolone (steroid) induced Diabetes mellitus and 2) DM and raised creatinine levels (kidney failure). There is a relationship which exists between Diabetes Mellitus and raised creatinine levels. Usually this situation arises when DM is there for a long time and not controlled and this situ Continue reading >>

How Do I Maintain Creatinine Levels Naturally In Diabetic Patients?

How Do I Maintain Creatinine Levels Naturally In Diabetic Patients?

Are you asking how to lower elevated serum creatinine, in diabetics a sign of kidney failure, or keeping it low so preventing kidney damage? In both preventdehydration, which having long time high blood sugar levels can induce because that will make you lose lots more urine=water, and do strive for very strict blood pressure control (systolic pressure <130 mmHg). We prefer prescribing ACE inhibitor s to treat high blood pressure in diabetics, and/or kidney problems e.g. elevated protein excretion in the urine, since these have been proven to slow down the rate of deterioration of said kidney problems. No "natural" ways except keeping one self well hydrated, sorry! You'll need a suitable lifestyle and meds to control your diabetes well, and meds to control your blood pressure. Please don't get hung up on the idea of wanting to do everything "the natural way" and in doing so waste lots of precious time during which you could prevent secondary complications of diabetes from taking place. "Cleansing your body" and other such unscientific BS approaches should best be forgotten. E.g. purging could cause dehydration. All the best! I echo what your other answerers have said: elevated creatinine can be caused by many different things, so it's hard to give an answer that covers all possible causes, including dehydration. So take this as subjective input from the experience of just one Type 1 diabetic (i.e., me!). I have a very slightly elevated level of creatinine that my kidney doctor believes is related to residual kidney scarring that resulted from years of having uncontrolled blood sugars. I've been ever more strictly controlled, progressively getting tighter and tighter, over a number of years, and my nephrologist is happy with the improved kidney function that's come along Continue reading >>

Low Creatinine Levels Linked To Diabetes

Low Creatinine Levels Linked To Diabetes

To view this video please enable JavaScript and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video No compatible source was found for this media. NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Lower serum levels of creatinine are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a brief report in the March issue of Diabetes Care. The authors note that creatinine in serum is a direct indicator of total muscle mass. “Although skeletal muscle is one of the major targets of insulin,” write Dr. Tomoshige Hayashi, from Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan, and colleagues, “to our knowledge, no prospective study has investigated the association between total skeletal muscle mass and type 2 diabetes.” The current investigation included 8570 men in the Kansai Healthcare Study, an ongoing project examining risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases. The participants were between 40 and 55 years of age and nondiabetic at entry. Incident diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose levels reached 126 mg/dL or higher or if treatment with an oral hypoglycemic agent or insulin was initiated. After 4 years of follow-up, 877 men were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. “The multiple-adjusted odds ratio for those who had serum creatinine between 0.40 and 0.60 mg/dL was 1.91 compared with those who had levels between 0.71 and 0.80 mg/dL,” the investigators report. They conjecture that, because resistance training is known to cause muscular hypertrophy, it might be worth exploring whether such training could increase creatinine levels and thereby cut the risk of diabetes. Reference: Diabetes Care 2009;32:424-426. Continue reading >>

Creatinine And Creatinine Clearance

Creatinine And Creatinine Clearance

A A A Test Overview Creatinine and creatinine clearance tests measure the level of the waste product creatinine in your blood and urine. These tests tell how well your kidneys are working. The substance creatine is formed when food is changed into energy through a process called metabolism. Creatine is broken down into another substance called creatinine, which is taken out of your blood by the kidneys and then passed out of your body in urine. If your kidneys are damaged and can't work normally, the amount of creatinine in your urine goes down while its level in your blood goes up. Three types of tests on creatinine can be done: Blood creatinine level The blood creatinine level shows how well your kidneys are working. A high creatinine level may mean your kidneys are not working properly. The amount of creatinine in the blood depends partly on the amount of muscle tissue you have. Men generally have higher creatinine levels than women. Creatinine clearance test A creatinine clearance test measures how well creatinine is removed from your blood by your kidneys. A creatinine clearance test gives better information than a blood creatinine test on how well your kidneys are working. A creatinine clearance test is done on both a blood sample and on a sample of urine collected over 24 hours (24-hour urine sample). Blood urea nitrogen-to-creatinine ratio (BUN:creatinine) The levels of blood creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) can be used to find the BUN-to-creatinine ratio. A BUN-to-creatinine ratio can help your doctor check for problems, such as dehydration, that may cause abnormal BUN and creatinine levels. Urea is a waste product made when protein is broken down in your body. Urea is made in the liver and passed out of your body in the urine. A blood urea nitrogen (BU Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Low Creatinine Level

What Are The Causes Of Low Creatinine Level

What are the Causes of Low Creatinine Level? Creatinine is a break-down product of creatine phosphate in muscle, and is usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body (depending on muscle mass).In chemical terms, creatinine is a spontaneously formed cyclic derivative of creatine. Creatinine is chiefly filtered out of the blood by the kidneys (glomerular filtration and proximal tubular secretion). There is little-to-no tubular reabsorption of creatinine. Creatinine levels in blood and urine may be used to calculate the creatinine clearance (CrCl), which reflects the glomerular filtration rate (GFR).Many people’s creatinine are relatively low, this phenomenon is abnormal. There are many causes that can cause this problem, such as anemia and leukemia, etc. Once the patients appear this symptom, must pay attention. Many people know less about the cause of low serum creatinine. Lower creatinine illustrates that there is problem appearing in kidney. During renal function test, it is meaningless clinically, when the urea nitrogen and creatinine are lower than normal level. Many causes can lead to low creatinine, including general anemia, myodystrophy, amyotrophy, leukemia, diabetes insipidus and other diseases. If the value is slightly higher than normal, people may take test again. Serum creatinine is the most basic index to detect whether the renal function is normal or not and also the necessary item for physical examination. Many people after testing are detected that their value are within normal range, thus, they think their renal function is normal. In fact, this is a wrong view for this disease. The creatinine can not reflect the condition of renal function timely and exactly. When most of the kidney suffers from pathological damage and glomerular filtration Continue reading >>

Creatinine Test

Creatinine Test

Print Overview A creatinine test reveals important information about your kidneys. Creatinine is a chemical waste product that's produced by your muscle metabolism and to a smaller extent by eating meat. Healthy kidneys filter creatinine and other waste products from your blood. The filtered waste products leave your body in your urine. If your kidneys aren't functioning properly, an increased level of creatinine may accumulate in your blood. A serum creatinine test measures the level of creatinine in your blood and provides an estimate of how well your kidneys filter (glomerular filtration rate). A creatinine urine test can measure creatinine in your urine. Why it's done A serum creatinine test — which measures the level of creatinine in your blood — can indicate whether your kidneys are working properly. How often you need creatinine tests depends on any underlying conditions and your risk of kidney damage. For example: If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend a creatinine test at least once a year. If you have kidney disease, your doctor may recommend creatinine tests at regular intervals to monitor your condition. If you have an illness that may affect your kidneys — such as high blood pressure or diabetes — or you're taking medication that may affect your kidneys, your doctor may recommend creatinine tests. How you prepare The serum creatinine test is a common blood test. There is usually no preparation prior to the test. Your doctor may give you specific instructions. What you can expect During the serum creatinine test, a member of your health care team takes a sample of blood by inserting a needle into a vein in your arm. The blood sample is sent to a lab for analysis. You can return to your usual activities immediately. In some c Continue reading >>

Low Serum Creatinine Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes In Morbidly Obese Women And Men: A Cross-sectional Study

Low Serum Creatinine Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes In Morbidly Obese Women And Men: A Cross-sectional Study

Abstract Low skeletal muscle mass is associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Serum creatinine may serve as a surrogate marker of muscle mass, and a possible relationship between low serum creatinine and type 2 diabetes has recently been demonstrated. We aimed to validate this finding in a population of Caucasian morbidly obese subjects. Cross-sectional study of 1,017 consecutive morbidly obese patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Logistic regression (univariate and multiple) was used to assess the association between serum creatinine and prevalent type 2 diabetes, including statistically testing for the possibility of non-linearity in the relationship by implementation of Generalized Additive Models (GAM) and piecewise linear regression. Possible confounding variables such as age, family history of diabetes, waist-to-hip ratio, hypertension, current smoking, serum magnesium, albuminuria and insulin resistance (log HOMA-IR) were adjusted for in three separate multiple logistic regression models. The unadjusted GAM analysis suggested a piecewise linear relationship between serum creatinine and diabetes. Each 1 μmol/l increase in serum creatinine was associated with 6% (95% CI; 3%-8%) and 7% (95% CI; 2%-13%) lower odds of diabetes below serum creatinine levels of 69 and 72 μmol/l in women and men, respectively. Above these breakpoints the serum creatinine concentrations did not reduce the odds further. Adjustments for non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors left the piecewise effect for both women and men largely unchanged. In the fully adjusted model, which includes serum magnesium, albuminuria and log HOMA-IR, the piecewise effect for men was statistically non-significant, but it remained present for women. Pat Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic kidney disease is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. It can progress to kidney failure in some cases. Treatment aims to prevent or delay the progression of the disease. Also, it aims to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke which are much more common than average in people with this disease. To find out more about the kidneys and urine see also separate leaflet called The Kidneys and Urinary Tract. What is diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. In this condition the filters of the kidneys, the glomeruli, become damaged. Because of this the kidneys 'leak' abnormal amounts of protein from the blood into the urine. The main protein that leaks out from the damaged kidneys is called albumin. In normal healthy kidneys only a tiny amount of albumin is found in the urine. A raised level of albumin in the urine is the typical first sign that the kidneys have become damaged by diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is divided into two main categories, depending on how much albumin is lost through the kidneys: Microalbuminuria: in this condition, the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is between 30 and 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called incipient nephropathy. Proteinuria: in this condition the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is more than 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called macroalbuminuria or overt nephropathy. How does diabetic kidney disease develop and progress? A raised blood sugar (glucose) level that occurs in people with diabetes can cause a rise in the level of some chemicals within the kidney. These chemicals tend to make the glomeruli more 'leaky' which then allows albumin to lea Continue reading >>

Kidneys, Creatinine, Type 1 Diabetes

Kidneys, Creatinine, Type 1 Diabetes

Kidneys, Creatinine, Type 1 Diabetes: According to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), diabetes accounts for more than 43 percent of the more than 100,000 cases of kidney failure reported annually in the U.S. Most people associate type 2 diabetes with kidney disease, but type 1 diabetes can have the same deleterious effects. High creatinine level is commonly seen among people with type 1 diabetes, especially those with a long medical history. Creatinine is a waste product created by the normal breakdown of muscle during activity and deposited in the blood. If your kidneys are functioning properly the creatinine will be filtered out of the blood and into the urine. If your kidneys are not working properly then they are unable to properly filter the creatinine out of the blood and into the urine. The amount of creatinine build up in your blood helps determine the amount of kidney function. Elevated creatinine level indicates serious kidney damage. Why does type 1 diabetes cause high creatinine level? Kidneys are composed of millions of tiny blood vessels with even tinier holes in them that act as filters. As blood flows through the tiny blood vessels, small waste products such as creatinine will squeeze through the holes and will filtered out of body in urine. Meanwhile, useful substances, such as proteins will be kept in body. However, in type 1 diabetes, if blood sugar is poorly controlled (hyperglycemia) , it can make the kidneys filter too much blood. The extra workload can make the kidneys exhausted. Over time, the kidneys will fail progressively and fail to filter blood adequately. As a result, a large amount of wastes such as creatinine, urea, etc. builds up in blood leading to an elevated creatinine level. Also, the worn k Continue reading >>

Creatinine (blood)

Creatinine (blood)

Does this test have other names? Serum creatinine, blood creatinine What is this test? This is a blood test that measures how well your kidneys work. Clearing and filtering waste products out of your blood are important kidney functions. Creatinine is a normal waste product that builds up in your blood from using your muscles. Your body produces creatinine at a constant rate all the time, and healthy kidneys remove almost all of this creatinine. By comparing the amount of creatinine in your blood with a standard normal amount, your healthcare provider can get a good idea of how well your kidneys are working. Why do I need this test? You may need this test as part of your regular medical checkup. It's often included in routine blood tests to check your overall health. You may need this test if you have signs or symptoms of kidney disease. Your risk for kidney disease is higher if you are an older adult, have high blood pressure, have a family history of kidney disease, or have diabetes. You may also be at increased risk if you are African American, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific Islander, or American Indian. Signs and symptoms of kidney disease include: Frequent tiredness Swelling in your feet or ankles Poor appetite Puffiness around your eyes Dry, itchy skin Muscle cramps Frequent urination Painful urination Blood or protein in your urine If you are being treated for kidney disease, you may also need this test to see how well your treatment is working. What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may use your blood creatinine level, along with your age, race, sex, and other factors, to calculate your glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The GFR is considered the best measure of kidney function. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) is another blood test that' Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Creatinine Levels

Symptoms Of High Creatinine Levels

Creatinine is a waste product of muscle metabolism. When muscles work, they break down proteins, including the amino acid creatine, to produce energy. Most creatine is consumed but about 2 percent enters the bloodstream as creatinine. The kidneys remove most creatinine. Levels of creatinine can be affected by age, sex, race, diet, muscle mass, some medications, and chronic disease, such as hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, diabetes and kidney disease. The normal range of creatinine in blood serum is 0.75 to 1.3 mg/dL for men and 0.6 to 1.1 mg/dL for women. Normal values may vary slightly depending on the laboratory and the technique used. Video of the Day A high level of creatinine is not a direct cause of symptoms, and someone with above-normal levels may notice no change. Symptoms associated with high creatinine are most often caused by an underlying illness that affects kidney function. The most frequent cause is kidney disease itself. Symptoms of kidney disease can include fatigue, headaches, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, weight loss, itchy skin, swelling in the hands and feet, frequent or painful urination or a change in the color of the urine. Diabetes and high blood pressure are also associated with kidney failure. Other symptoms may indicate muscle destruction, hypothyroidism, or diabetic ketoacidosis as the cause of elevated creatinine. A high creatinine level does not necessarily mean the person has chronic kidney disease, but indicates the need for other tests. Continue reading >>

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