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Diabetes And Low Blood Oxygen

Pulse Oximetry Not Reliable For Diabetic Patients?

Pulse Oximetry Not Reliable For Diabetic Patients?

Summarized from Pu L, Shen Y, Lu L et al. Increased blood glycohemoglobin A1c levels lead to overestimation of arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry in patients with type 2 diabetes. Cardiovascular Diabetology 2012; 11: 110. As accessed: www.cardiab.com/content/11/1/110 December 2012. Pulse oximeters, which are ubiquitous in nearly all areas of clinical care, provide the means for safe, non-invasive continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation. The validity of using pulse oximetry to assess patient blood oxygenation status depends on SpO2, the parameter measured by pulse oximetry, being a reliable estimate of arterial oxygen saturation (sO2(a)), the parameter directly measured during blood gas analysis. In most clinical contexts SpO2 is more or less equal to sO2(a), but that is not always the case and it is important to be aware of the limitations of pulse oximetry and define clinical situations when there is no alternative to blood gas analysis for accurate assessment of blood oxygenation. According to the results of a recent clinical study, pulse oximetry may not be suitable for assessment of blood oxygenation among type 2 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control and consequent increased HbA1c. The study population comprised 261 type 2 diabetes patients who were critically ill and required oxygen therapy and/or mechanical ventilation. Their care included continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation using a pulse oximeter. Fasting blood was sampled from each study patient for glucose and HbA1c. Arterial blood was sampled for blood gas analysis, including measurement of sO2(a). As arterial blood was sampled, the patient’s SpO2 reading from pulse oximeter was recorded. For the purposes of this study poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c > 7.0 %; by th Continue reading >>

The Problem Of Tissue Oxygenation In Diabetes Mellitus. I. Its Relation To The Early Functional Changes In The Microcirculation Of Diabetic Subjects.

The Problem Of Tissue Oxygenation In Diabetes Mellitus. I. Its Relation To The Early Functional Changes In The Microcirculation Of Diabetic Subjects.

The problem of tissue oxygenation in diabetes mellitus. I. Its relation to the early functional changes in the microcirculation of diabetic subjects. The underlying cause leading to the reversible functional changes in the microcirculation of insulin-dependent diabetic subjects early during the disease prior to any clinical signs of retinopathy and nephropathy (functional microangiopathy) is discussed. It is suggested that the initial microvascular dilation observed in diabetics is due to an autoregulatory response to relative tissue hypoxia providing an increased tissue perfusion in order to improve tissue oxygen delivery. Supporting evidence for this suggestion is derived from the findings that diabetics simultaneously may show increased tissue oxygen consumption and decreased ability of the circulating blood to release oxygen to the tissues. The latter defect is likely to be caused by two interrelated factors: 1. an increased proportion of haemoglobin A1c with high oxygen affinity, and 2. difficulties of maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of plasma inorganic phosphate in order to provide an optimal 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) content in the erythrocytes. The basal oxygen demand of diabetics may fluctuate even within a few hours dependent upon the state of metabolic control and is increased at times of poor regulation. Hence, diabetics may suffer from innumerable cellular hypoxic injuries, which during the first years of the disease are counteracted in the microcirculation by an autoregulatory response. These microvascular reactions associated with increased plasma permeation may over the years be of major importance for the development of the degenerative microangiopathy in diabetes. Continue reading >>

Chronic Diseases Caused By Low Oxygen In Cells

Chronic Diseases Caused By Low Oxygen In Cells

Chronic Diseases Caused by Low Oxygen in Cells Article contributed by Nirvana science consultant dr.Artour Rakhimov ( ). We already discovered that people with chronic diseases have ineffective or heavy breathing pattern 24/7 with deep breathing 24/7 (for clinical studies, visit the Homepage of this site). While considering carbon dioxide effects, we also found that chronic overbreathing leads to reduced oxygen transport to cells. As a result, ineffective breathing patterns cause tissue hypoxia, chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, and many other negative effects caused by low body-oxygen levels and hypocapnia (reduced CO2 levels). Meanwhile, it is known that tissue hypoxia is the driving force for cancer, heart disease, diabetes, chronic fatigue and many other health conditions. Hence, the more people breathe, the more severe health problems, diseases , and symptoms they are going to experience. In this Section we are going to focus on some common chronic diseases : (overview of the main symptoms and signs of asthma, its causes and treatment). - Symptoms of asthma : a more detailed analysis of main asthma signs - Bronchial asthma (destructive effects of hyperventilation of lungs and airways in humans) - What causes asthma web page provides details of effects of hyperventilaiton on people with asthma - How to stop acute asthma Exacerbation educates about a simple breathing exercise that can be used instead of relievers (like Ventolin) - Sports induced asthma and how to prevent it with one very simple trick - Asthma treatment is based on elimination of overbreathing since chronic overbreathing leads to low body O2, bronchospasm, chronic inflammation and other signs and symptoms of asthma - Cure asthma with breathing normalization. If one has normal breathing 24/7, a Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes? Low Oxygen Levels In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing24/7

What Causes Diabetes? Low Oxygen Levels In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing24/7

All these references (related to hyperventilation) are at the very end of this knol. For those, who prefer visual representations, here is a graph that show that all diabetics are heavy breathers. What are the effects of chronic hyperventilation? First of all, normal breathing supplies almost greatest possible oxygenation of the arterial blood (as much as 99 per cent). As a result, breathing more air can not lead to any essential increase in blood oxygenation. The situation with heavy breathing diabetics is ever worse. It is easy to see, that their deep and heavy breathing is performed making use of the upper chest (thoracic) muscles. In such conditions, their lower areas of the lungs do not get fresh air quantity with superior oxygen content. Even though they breathe more air, oxygenation of their arterial blood gets less due to chest breathing. The next thing is that during heavy breathing we diminish amount of CO2 (carbon dioxide) in the arterial blood. This substance is a potent vasodilator (some medical studies claim that CO2 is the most potent known vasodilator Djurberg et al, 1998). CO2 is also necessary for release of oxygen in tissues: it is called the Bohr effect. In conditions of overbreathing (or hypocapnia low CO2 in the arterial blood), less oxygen is released in capillaries due to the reduced Bohr effect. Actually, a few hundreds of research papers (decades of medical research) have demonstrated that over-breathing DECREASES body and cells oxygenation. As a result, ineffective breath patterns of diabetics causes cells deficiency of oxygen or hypoxia. Bear in mind, that numerous studies have proven that most people, diabetics included, have lowest body oxygen levels and worst symptoms during early morning hours (search the web for sleep heavy breathing ef Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Oxygen Levels: What Is Safe And What Is Low?

Normal Blood Oxygen Levels: What Is Safe And What Is Low?

Blood oxygen level is the amount of oxygen circulating in the blood. Most of the oxygen is carried by red blood cells, which collect oxygen from the lungs and deliver it to all parts of the body. The body closely monitors blood oxygen levels to keep them within a specific range, so that there is enough oxygen for the needs of every cell in the body. A person's blood oxygen level is an indicator of how well the body distributes oxygen from the lungs to the cells, and it can be important for people's health. Blood oxygen levels may be measured using a pulse oximeter. The most efficient way to monitor blood oxygen levels is by an arterial blood gas or ABG test. For this test, a blood sample is taken from an artery, usually in the wrist. This procedure is very accurate, but it can be a little painful. An ABG test can be difficult to do at home, so a person may wish to do an alternative test, using a small device known as a pulse oximeter. A pulse oximeter is a small clip that is often put on a finger, although it can also be used on the ear or toe. It measures blood oxygen indirectly by light absorption through a person's pulse. Although the pulse oximeter test is easier, quicker, and not painful, it is not as accurate as the ABG test. This is because it can be influenced by factors such as dirty fingers, bright lights, nail polish, and poor circulation to the extremities. For people who wish to purchase a pulse oximeter, there is a range of easy-to-use devices available online . A normal blood oxygen level varies between 75 and 100 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) . A blood oxygen level below 60 mm Hg is considered low and may require oxygen supplementation, depending on a doctor's decision and the individual case. When blood oxygen level is too low compared to the average Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Pulse Oximetry

The Benefits Of Pulse Oximetry

By Roberta Kleinman | 2016-06-03T15:24:30+00:00 February 10th, 2010| Diabetes Management , General Information , Newsletters | 1 Comment To continue our exploration of diabetes and heart health during American Heart Month, I would like to introduce you to pulse oximetry, also known as pulse ox. In a nutshell, pulse oximetry devices measure how much oxygen is in your blood. Low oxygen saturation (hypoxemia) in blood can impede body function and harm vital tissues, resulting in shortness of breath, fatigue, confusion, and can be life threatening. Luckily, technology has come a long way in the field of pulse oximetry. In the late 1970s, an oximeter cost approximately $21,000 and the machine was so big that it had to be placed on a cart which was rolled from hospital room to room. Today, we have the availability of a compact, portable non-invasive finger pulse oximeter which is simple to use and reasonably priced. Finger pulse oximeters measure the concentration of oxygen in the blood by placing a two-sided probe over the finger. It then monitors pulsating capillaries in the finger tip. The reading should be between 96-100%. Any number below 90% is cause for concern and should certainly be addressed by a physician. A finger pulse oximeter can also read your pulse rate and heart rate. People with diabetes are known to have circulatory problems, especially in their lower legs and arms, known as PVD or peripheral vascular disease. This is caused by fatty plaque buildup or atherosclerosis in the blood vessels. PVD is twenty times more common in diabetics than the average population. The most common symptom is intermittent claudication which is cramping leg pain brought on by walking distances. Symptoms can get so bad that someone with PVD will only be able to walk a few feet w Continue reading >>

Anemia

Anemia

When “Tired Blood” is Slowing You Down Most people have heard of anemia and know that it has something to do with the blood. Most people also associate anemia with feeling tired. But probably not too many people could explain exactly what anemia is. Stated simply, anemia is a condition in which there is a lower than normal number of healthy red blood cells in the body and/or a lower than normal amount of hemoglobin in the red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. The specific part of the red blood cell that carries oxygen is called hemoglobin. Red blood cells also carry waste products from the cells to the urinary and respiratory systems to be excreted. When either the number of red blood cells or the amount of hemoglobin is low, the body’s cells receive less oxygen than normal. A low oxygen level can cause fatigue and other symptoms such as weakness, difficulty exercising, and light-headedness. Anemia can develop for many reasons. In fact, there are more than 400 types of anemia. But they can all be categorized into these three general groups: Anemia caused by the loss of blood Anemia caused by a decrease in red blood cell production in the bone marrow or impaired production of red blood cells Anemia caused by red blood cell destruction Anemia is a fairly common condition, but it often goes unrecognized and therefore not treated. Its symptoms are vague and easily mistaken for symptoms of other serious or chronic diseases. But even mild anemia can significantly lower one’s quality of life, and untreated anemia can have serious long-term health effects. Diabetes and anemia Diabetes does not directly cause anemia, but certain complications and conditions associated with diabetes can contribute to it. For example, both Continue reading >>

Is Oxygen Key To Insulin Resistance?

Is Oxygen Key To Insulin Resistance?

Oxygen is key to life but could it also be a key factor in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes? We take a look at the evidence behind this idea and also which methods could use oxygen towards our advantage in tackling insulin resistance. A 2014 study found a link between the lack of oxygen on Everest and insulin resistance. Some research studies appear to show quite conclusively that restricting oxygen intake does indeed result in increased insulin resistance. A study carried out by researchers from the University of Southampton and University College London, published in 2014, investigated the effects of low oxygen levels on insulin resistance by taking adults up Mount Everest. The researchers found that as the participants reached higher altitudes, and were thus exposed to low levels of oxygen to breathe, they developed insulin resistance. Oxygen chamber improves insulin sensitivity By contrast, the opposite effect has also been observed. Researchers from the University of Adelaide tested the effects by exposing people with type 2 diabetes to a total of six periods of 90 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen therapy over a five-week period. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves spending time in a pressurised diving chamber containing 100% oxygen. The technique resulted in a dramatic 40% improvement in insulin sensitivity, an effect that would usually require a 13% loss of body weight. It seems apparent from this that the more oxygen we get, the better insulin sensitivity we have. Could oxygen also explain why people get insulin resistance in normal life at normal non-mountainous altitudes? It is notable that sleep apnea, a problem that results in disrupted breathing during sleep, is very closely related with type 2 diabetes. Sleep apnea shares obesity as a common major risk f Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Oxygen And Diabetes

The Connection Between Oxygen And Diabetes

A lack of O2 in fat cells triggers inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, described the sequence of early cellular responses to a high-fat diet, one that can result in obesity-induced insulin resistance and diabetes. The findings, published in the June 5 issue of Cell, also suggest potential molecular targets for preventing or reversing the process. “We’ve described the etiology of obesity-related diabetes. We’ve pinpointed the steps, the way the whole thing happens,” said Jerrold M. Olefsky, MD, associate dean for Scientific Affairs and Distinguished Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego. “The research is in mice, but the evidence suggests that the processes are comparable in humans and these findings are important to not just understanding how diabetes begins, but how better to treat and prevent it.” More than 25 million Americans have diabetes – 8.3 percent of the population – with another 79 million Americans estimated to be pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels poorly regulated by either inadequate insulin production or because cells to not respond properly to the regulating hormone. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and a major risk factor for other life-threatening conditions, including heart disease and stroke. Past research by Olefsky and others has shown that obesity is characterized by low-grade inflammation in adipose or fat tissues and that this inflammatory state can become chronic and result in systemic insulin resistance and diabetes. In today’s Cell paper, the scientists describe the earliest stages of the process, which Continue reading >>

Oxygen Could Be The Key To A Cure For Diabetes

Oxygen Could Be The Key To A Cure For Diabetes

Oxygen could be the key to a cure for diabetes Oxygen could be the key to a cure for diabetes With Obesity steadily increasing in the Western world, the number of people suffering from Diabetes has become grossly excessive and is on the increase. The treatment of Diabetes demands that the diabetic make drastic lifestyle changes. These changes can include: weight loss, rigid exercise programs and a complete restructuring of a persons diet. Unfortunately many patients struggle to initiate and maintain these changes and find themselves being gradually and increasingly affected by damaging symptoms of the disease. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system attacking itself and destroying cells in the pancreas. The pancreas produces insulin and so it results in the body not producing enough. It can be caused by an infection, toxins or an autoimmune reaction. Type 2 diabetes can be caused by multiple risk factors including obesity, increasing age, poor diet, pregnancy and illness. When there isnt enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) cant get into the bodys cells and builds up in the bloodstream. Since the cells arent getting the glucose they need, they cant function properly and the build up causes damage in multiple areas of the body, leading to many various diabetes-related diseases and conditions. A new bio-material has been designed which has the capacity to spontaneously generate oxygen when it is exposed to water. This material allows oxygen to be released in the bloodstream in targeted or generalised areas increasing oxygen levels within the body and not relying on lung function. A major potential use of this material is that it can be used in transplantation and skin grafts. Normally when new cells are surgically placed it ta Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Decreased Oxygen Saturation

Diabetes-related Causes Of Decreased Oxygen Saturation

Diabetes-related causes of Decreased oxygen saturation Our information shows that 2causes of Decreased oxygen saturation are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 37total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Decreased oxygen saturation if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. All Causes of Decreased oxygen saturation The full list of all possible causes for Decreased oxygen saturation described in various sources is as follows: See full list of possible disease causes of Decreased oxygen saturation Conditions listing medical symptoms: Decreased oxygen saturation: The following list of conditionshave ' Decreased oxygen saturation ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Decreased oxygen saturation or choose View All. By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use . Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oxygen Therapy

Diabetes And Oxygen Therapy

Worldwide,diabetes affects over 370 million people. The disease that was nonexistent in children only a few decades ago isnow labelled "the silent killer" because symptoms are easily missed ormisdiagnosed. In fact, of those 370million people, its estimated that almost 190 million of them have no ideathat they even have the disease. This "killer disease" is defined as the bodys inability to respond appropriately to insulin (orcreate appropriate levels of insulin), with the result that metabolism of carbsand an increase in glucose levels are found in the blood and urine. The numbersof diabetic people worldwide is growing at an exponential rate. If you suspect that you or someone you lovesuffers from this disease, but you havent received a diagnosis, here are someof the best indicators. Individuallythey dont indicate a condition at all, but taken in combination, theyre agood reason to seek a medical opinion. Itseems strange to think of weight loss as an indicator of a disease that weregularly associate with heavy people, but if you experience substantial weightloss with no changes to your diet or exercise routine, then this could be anindicator that you are diabetic. The problem isthat the disease not only makes your body drop fat pounds but also muscleweight. Frequentthirst or urination is probably the most commonly known indicator of the diabetic disease. Your kidneys are workingovertime to attempt to get rid of the extra glucose in your system, and thiscan result in many bathroom breaks, even waking you from your sleep. Thirst comes as a result of your body tryingdesperately to replenish all of the lost water through urination. This can become a vicious cycle, and cansometimes result in hospitalization for dehydration. Bouts ofunnaturally high hunger pangs are also a s Continue reading >>

"low Blood Oxygen And Type 2": Diabetes Community - Support Group

Post my content anonymously (without my username) Put this on my watchlist and alert me by email to new posts I never heard of this but that doesn't mean it's not true. I would certainly call my doctor and ask about this. The pharmacist would be able to give you good information on this, too. Catwoman, I always have low blood oxygen at the hospital .What are the symptoms so I may reongnize it at home,My dr. just raised my blood pressure meds instead of a oxygen test,slipper :smile: I have sleep apena also....I'am very tired most of the time, could fall asleepanywhere. I have had over night blood readings and my blood oxygen wentdown into the 40's when I was sleep...it's now normally reading in the midto high 80's The 90's is where it should be reading. Low blood oxygen starves your body of oxygen...and your brain does not think well. Catwoman It has been many years since I was on metformin (glucophage) as I had to come off of it for other than heart related reasons and went to other oral meds....Since then, I have become a heart patient with left ventricular heart failure and also utilize oxygen during much of the day and during allsleeping hours for O2 insufficiency....Then about three years ago I was changed from Amaryl oral med due to too many lows and switched over to Januvia oral med as the replacement...My Endocrinologist felt that the Januvia would be a good fit as it had no known interactions with heart issues other than it didn't go well with Lanoxin (which I wasn't taking...) I had also been hospitalized twice with low O2 that also led to this decision by my doc...The Januvia held me in good control with glucose numbers along with a nightly injection of a Lantus, a background insulin...I am currently dealing with other health issues that are impacting my diab Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cause: Low Oxygen In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing

Diabetes Cause: Low Oxygen In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing

What causes diabetes? On a cell level, the cause of diabetes is simple. Several medical research groups (Moritz et al, 2002; Carroll & Ashcroft, 2006; Regazzetti et al, 2009; Halberg et al, 2009; Heinis et al, 2010; Cheng et al, 2010) have recently discovered that oxygen levels in pancreatic beta-cells regulate activity of pancreatic cells through hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha. Tissue hypoxia and reduced perfusion lead to poor glucose and insulin control, and insulin resistance. There are many other problems caused by tissue hypoxia. The reasons behind low body O2 is heavy breathing. This fact was confirmed by all 5 clinical studies that measured breathing rates in people with diabetes mellitus. Minute ventilation numbers explain the diabetes cause *One row corresponds to one research paper or medical science article Condition Minute ventilation Number of patients All references or click below for abstracts var ezzns22 = {0.50:504556,1.80:504655,4.50:504667,1.50:504652,1.60:504653,3.00:504664,0.05:504099,0.80:504559,1.00:504647,1.30:504650,0.35:504552,2.60:504660,3.50:504665,0.30:504551,0.45:504555,0.60:504557,0.70:504558,0.40:504554,0.90:504560,2.00:504657,5.00:504669,2.40:504659,2.80:504661,0.10:504141,0.15:504144,1.40:504651,1.90:504656,1.70:504654,2.20:504658,4.00:504666,0.20:504145,0.25:504548,1.10:504648,1.20:504649,}; var ezoflbf_2_22 = function() { __ez.queue.addFunc('ReloadFromP_1022', 'IL11ILILIIlLLLILILLLLIILLLIIL11111LLILiiLIliLlILlLiiLLIiILL.ReloadFromP', 1022, false, ['banger.js'], false, false, false, true); }; var ezoflbf_22 = function() { eval(ez_write_tag([[300,250],'normalbreathing_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_4'])); };ezoflbf_22(); var __ezfl_sss_1022 = function() { setTimeout(function(){ var ezflaun = IL11ILILIIlLLLILILLLLIILLLIIL11111LLILiiLIliLl Continue reading >>

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