diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Lidocaine

Diabetic Foot Creams

Diabetic Foot Creams

Had appointment with a female foot doctor but she was replaced by a male one. He wrote a rx for an anti inflammatory cream Volteren gel. Then female podiatrist replaces his prescription with rx Lidocaine. Only problem is insurance does not pay. It's $45 but the over the counter is only $9. This retard female podiatrist sends a prescription for an over the counter! Lidocaine 4 percent which is Aspercreme. I went to the dr office 4 times running an fool's errand. Male podiatrist told me it is real serious when feet and legs go numb and turn purple and black. I only have tingling. He said when they amputate one leg, two years later they amputate the other and two years after that the patient passes away. My current diabetes shoes are worn out and my a1c is 10.1. Yet when I go to the orthopedic shoe place, they want me to have a diabetic shoe request form filled out. I have my prescription from my foot doctor but they won't take because according to the insurance company it can only be filled by my diabetes doctor. Problem is my diabetes doctor won't fill it because "patient does not meet criteria for diabetic shoes"?? According to my podiatrist, there really is no such thing as "diabetic shoes". What they mean by "diabetic" shoes is that the shoes are wide enough for your feet, have a large (tall) toe box, and have no seams on the inside that can rub and cause blisters. Many athletic shoes and walking shoes fit those criteria. The thing is, most insurance companies including Medicare will pay for one pair of "diabetic shoes" per year. But they will only pay if an MD writes the prescription, not a podiatrist. Then the shoe retailer jacks up the price in order to sock it to the insurance company. Personally, I don't bother with that. I just buy very comfortable shoes with n Continue reading >>

Lidocaine - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs

Lidocaine - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs

Lidocaine, sold under the brand names Akten, Glydo, and Lidoderm, relieves pain when applied to the skin via cream, gel, or patch. Lidocaine can also be given through the veins before surgical procedures to numb the surrounding area where medication is being administered and to help with irregular heartbeat. Lidocaine belongs to group of drugs known antiarrhythmics, which work by preventing sodium being pumped out of the cells of the heart to help the heart beat normally. Physicians may give lidocaine to people during heart surgery to help prevent irregular heartbeat. Doctors may also prescribe lidocaine off-label for premature babies who have irregular heartbeats. You should not take lidocaine if you have any of the following: Heart conditions like Adams-Stokes syndrome or heart blocks without a pacemaker Congestive heart failure (CHF) or heart shock Talk to your doctor before taking lidocaine if you are taking drugs called beta-blockers, including Inderal (propranolol), Bystolic (nebivolol), Lopressor ( metoprolol tartrate), and Toprol XL (metoprolol succinate). To date, whether lidocaine can help prevent a heart attack remains much-debated. If you have any concerns about this issue, talk to your doctor. In 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a black-box warning for lidocaine because of its danger in small children. The FDA warns that lidocaine should not be used to relieve tooth pain in teething babies, because lidocaine is easily absorbed into the bloodstream and may cause death. Lidocaine is an FDA Pregnancy Category B drug, which means it is generally safe to use during pregnancy because there is low risk of harm for your developing baby. Regardless, you should tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before taking this medi Continue reading >>

Lidocaine Patch Helps With Diabetes Pain

Lidocaine Patch Helps With Diabetes Pain

Home / Specialties / Neurology / Lidocaine Patch Helps with Diabetes Pain Skin patch helps with hand and foot pain. As reported in the Archives of Neurology, Dr. Richard L. Barbano, from the University of Rochester in New York, and colleagues tested the patch on 56 diabetic patients who had had nerve pain for longer than 3 months. A maximum of four patches could be given each day for a total of 18 hours. Many of the patients had allodynia, a condition in which pain is triggered by stimuli that normally arent painful. During a 3-week treatment period, most of the patients experienced a dramatic reduction in pain, the authors note. Patients also reported an improved quality of life with treatment, according to the team. Significant improvements were noted in sleep quality as well as in various psychologic measures, such as depression and anger. Also, these benefits were maintained in a subgroup of patients treated for an additional 5 weeks, during which time the dose of other pain medications could be slowly decreased, the authors report. Moreover, pain relief and quality of life improvements with the patch were comparable in patients with and without allodynia. Even when used four times a day, the patches were well tolerated without any significant side effects. Although promising, the findings need to be confirmed in a study in which some patients are treated with the lidocaine patch, while others receive an inactive placebo patch, the researchers emphasize. Archives of Neurology, June 2004. Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes & Lidocaine Injections - Diabetes - Medhelp

Type Ii Diabetes & Lidocaine Injections - Diabetes - Medhelp

Forums > Diabetes >Type II Diabetes & Lidocaine Injections This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities . Hi, I am a 50 year old female with fibromyalgia, depression, irritable bowel, chronic bladder problems, possible neuropathy.I weight 152 lbs and have gained approx. 10-15 lbs over the past year which I thought was due to the Lyrica that my doctor put me on for the nerve pain.I also have been having lidocaine injections monthly for the past year and quarterly I have it done intraveously for fibromyalgia.My blood sugar levels have always been normal up until I started with the lidocaine injections, since then it has been steadily increasing.Last fall it was 4.4, then in the spring 4.8 and now it is 5.4 - My family physician says it is my choice whether to start on Metformin now or wait until it reaches 5.8I read somewhere on the internet that lidocaine can affect your blood sugar levels.Can anyone confirm this for me?Thanks There is some information on the web about lidocaine transiently raising blood sugars but I did not find anything discussing a sustained rise. If you are also getting any steroid with the lidocaine, that is more likely the culprit. Sorry it took me so long to read your comment.I have been really ill with bladder problems, in Emerg, with a catheter, etc.I am 99% sure there is no steroid with the lidocaine, my doctor never mentioned that but I will check with her. This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities . Copyright 1994-2018 MedHelp. All rights reserved. MedHelp is a division of Vitals Consumer Services, LLC. The Content on this Site is presented in a summary fashion, and is intended to be used for ed Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments

Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the most common and most painful type of diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage caused by diabetes. To find pain relief from diabetic peripheral neuropathy, you have several medication options. Before starting any medication—even over-the-counter medications—you should discuss the medication with your doctor. It may have side effects you’re unaware of, or it may have interactions with other medications you’re taking. Especially since you have diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about medication options. Medications for diabetic peripheral neuropathy cannot, unfortunately, prevent more nerve damage. To do that, you should work hard to keep your blood glucose levels near normal. Frequent blood glucose monitoring, as well as careful meal planning, exercise, and diabetes medications or insulin, can help you control your blood glucose levels. Over-the-counter Medications for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy If your diabetic peripheral neuropathy is in the early stages, over-the-counter medications may provide pain relief. But remember, check with your doctor before taking these. For nerve pain relief, you can try: topical medications: People who have foot pain from diabetic peripheral neuropathy sometimes use topical medications, which you apply directly to your skin. Capsaicin cream, for example, can temporarily reduce pain. Prescription Medications for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy There are several prescription medications that can be used to treat more severe diabetic peripheral nerve pain. Your doctor will explain your medication options to you and help you find the best option for you. It may be necessary to take more than one medication to deal with the effects of nerve pain. Three prescription medications are FDA-appr Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Lidocaine Cream For People Having Insulin Shots

Benefits Of Lidocaine Cream For People Having Insulin Shots

Benefits of Lidocaine Cream For People Having Insulin Shots Benefits of Lidocaine Cream For People Having Insulin Shots Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar. The reason for this is that the pancreas is not producing enough insulin or the cells do not respond to the insulin produced. There are 2 types of DM, Type 1 DM (Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus) and Type 2 DM (Insulin Independent Diabetes Mellitus). Both type of diabetes requires regular insulin injection to regulate glucose content in the blood and prevent viscosity. This regular injection causes trauma on the patients skin. It causes bruises and redness on the skin. On some cases it also causes hematoma. There are several cases of skin trauma caused by injection to patients. Aside from the pain it also causes marks and discomfort on the part of the patient. They have no choice but to bear the pain for their healths sake. It is very important for this parenteral medication to be given regularly. Now there are products out in the market used by patients taking diabetes injection shots regularly. They use Lidocaine cream which is also known as numbing cream. Lidocaine creams are being used to block the nerve endings on the skin of the patient and in return stopping it from sending pain signals to the brain. It numbs the area that needs to the injection shot with. It is only applied on the injection site (usually on the abdomen and deltoid area). It is given subcutaneously. Lidocaine cream is a big help for the patients undergoing insulin shots daily because they dont need to bear the pain anymore. It prevents skin trauma and marks (bruises and hematoma) from happening. This numbing cream is a very useful medication especially because it is only applied topica Continue reading >>

Make Insulin Injections More Comfortable For Children With These Products

Make Insulin Injections More Comfortable For Children With These Products

There are about 200,000 children currently living with Type 1 Diabetes in the United States. Jonathan, an eight year old with Type 1 Diabetes, says I have to prick my finger eight to ten times a day and give myself injections several times a day too. Pricking fingers and insulin injections are something that can cause anxiety and fear in many children. And there’s not an option when you’re a Type 1 Diabetic, insulin injections are a must to survive. Let’s look at a few products that help to make injections and lancing easier and more comfortable for children. Buzzy Buzzy is a cute and effective pain control device for children. Ice and vibration are used to block out sensations of pain from needle sticks and injections. Buzzy uses the gate control method to reduce pain. There is one sensation gate in the brain and when you send motion, like vibration, and cold sensation, from ice, then it blocks the small pain sensation from a needlestick. So the brain’s gate is already block from vibration and cold sensations that the pain sensation cannot get through and the patient doesn’t feel pain. One study on children receiving an injection found that 91.4% reported feeling very mild to no pain when Buzzy was used. These are great results for a product that only costs about forty dollars. Buzzy, for personal use, comes in a black and yellow bee, a black and red ladybug, or just a plain black model. You can buy either the mini size, which is about the size of a small computer mouse, or extra large, which is 33% larger than the mini. Buzzy was developed by Amy Baxter who is a pediatric doctor. She said she developed Buzzy for all types of situations involving children and needles. She also says it’s great for newly diagnosed children with diabetes. They often have high Continue reading >>

Easd: Lidocaine Patch Bests Pregabalin For Diabetic Nerve Pain

Easd: Lidocaine Patch Bests Pregabalin For Diabetic Nerve Pain

EASD: Lidocaine Patch Bests Pregabalin for Diabetic Nerve Pain by John Gever John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today Explain to interested patients that severe pain in the legs and feet, accompanied by burning or tingling sensations, is a complication of diabetes related to nerve damage. Explain that the lidocaine patch used in the study is not FDA approved for this purpose. Explain that this was a randomized, controlled trial, a relatively strong form of research, although lack of a placebo group warrants caution in interpreting the efficacy results. Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. VIENNA -- A dermal patch containing 5% lidocaine (Lidoderm) proved as effective as pregabalin (Lyrica) in relieving neuropathic pain in diabetic patients with dramatically fewer side effects, a researcher said here. Only 3.8% of patients treated with the patch suffered drug-related adverse events, compared with 36.2% of those taking oral pregabalin in a 210-patient, four-week randomized trial (P<0.0001), reported Ingrid Tacken, PhD, an employee of Grunenthal GmbH, the patch's manufacturer. Nearly identical proportions of patients met the study's primary pain relief endpoint, defined as either a reduction of at least two points in pain scores on the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale III or a final score of no more than four, according to Tacken, who presented the results at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes meeting. The lidocaine patch -- formulated in a clear hydrogel -- is currently FDA-approved for postherpetic neuralgia but not for other forms of neuropathic pain. Pregabalin is approved for diabetic neuralgia. On an inten Continue reading >>

3 Ways To Ease Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetes Which Patients May Be Completely Missing

3 Ways To Ease Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetes Which Patients May Be Completely Missing

Related Reading: A New Weapon Found To Fight The Effects Of Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetes Around 60% to 90% of people with Chronic Kidney Disease and/or Diabetes end-up suffering with a painful nerve disorder, Neuropathy. Although the longer you have Diabetes or Chronic Kidney Disease, the more likely it is that you will develop Neuropathy, patient success has been documented after utilizing specific Topical (medication that is applied to body's surface) treatments such as Capsaicin Cream and Lidocaine Patches. Notable oral treatments which can potentially offer relief include Oxycodone, Tramadol, and Vitamin B12 supplements. Recommended Reading: Challenging Common Myths Associated With Diabetes By Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetic Patients Arm pain during and after dialysis is a frequent complaint among those on Hemodialysis. This is understandable as the nature of Dialysis is to be stuck with a rather larger needle on a continual basis. Do you suffer arm pain? If so, try sucking on a sweet candy approximately 5 minutes before being stuck because research has shown it improves pain tolerance. Also, do NOT tie restrictive material during needling (insertion of needle into fistula). The increase pressure may cause more pain and could lead to long-term Fistula damage. Recommended Reading: Cambridge University: Crushing Blow To Diabetes For At Risk Populations Such As CKD Patients Additionally, you can request cream such as Lidocaine to be applied 1 hour before your treatment. Some patients note that on top of using pain relief cream, adding Ethylene Oxide spray (available from pharmacy), works by numbing the area with a very cold temperature and further lessens pain. If pain persists, you may consider requesting for your nurse to use a smaller needle like size 17 Continue reading >>

Pharmacodynamics And Pharmacokinetics Of Lidocaine In A Rodent Model Of Diabetic Neuropathy | Anesthesiology | Asa Publications

Pharmacodynamics And Pharmacokinetics Of Lidocaine In A Rodent Model Of Diabetic Neuropathy | Anesthesiology | Asa Publications

Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine in a Rodent Model of Diabetic Neuropathy Werner ten Hoope, M.D. ; Markus W. Hollmann, M.D., Ph.D. ; Kora de Bruin ; Hein J. Verberne, M.D., Ph.D. ; Arie O. Verkerk, Ph.D. ; et al Hanno L. Tan, M.D., Ph.D. ; Camiel Verhamme, M.D., Ph.D. ; Janneke Horn, M.D., Ph.D. ; Marcel Rigaud, M.D. ; Susanne Picardi, M.D. ; Philipp Lirk, M.D., Ph.D. From the Department of Anesthesiology and Laboratory of Experimental Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (LEICA) (W.t.H., M.W.H., J.H., S.P., P.L.); Department of Nuclear Medicine (K.d.B., H.J.V.), Cardiology (A.O.V., H.L.T.), Anatomy, Embryology and Physiology (A.O.V.), and Neurology (C.V.), Academic Medical Center University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Trauma Hospital, Graz, Austria (M.R.); Department of Anesthesiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany (S.P.) and Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (P.L.). Submitted for publication December 15, 2015. Accepted for publication October 27, 2017. Submitted for publication December 15, 2015. Accepted for publication October 27, 2017. Address correspondence to Dr. Hollmann: Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. [email protected] . Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiologys articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue. Pain Medicine / Basic Science / Pain Medicine / Pharmacology Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics of L Continue reading >>

Lidocaine Patch Safe And Effective For Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

Lidocaine Patch Safe And Effective For Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

Lidocaine Patch Safe and Effective for Diabetic Neuropathic Pain June 23, 2004 The 5% lidocaine patch significantly reduces pain, improves quality of life (QOL), and may allow tapering of concomitant analgesic therapy in patients with painful diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), according to an open-label, flexible-dosing study published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology. "The treatment of painful DPN is often inadequate and limited by the systemic adverse effects of currently available regimens," write Richard L. Barbano, MD, PhD, and colleagues, from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in New York. "Potential advantages of the 5% lidocaine patch in DPN are its lack of systemic adverse effects and minimal interaction with other medications." The investigators enrolled 56 patients with a minimum three-month history of painful DPN. Subgroups included patients with allodyna (DPNA, n = 19) and without allodyna (DPNNA, n = 37). Patients were allowed to cover the area of maximal pain with 5% lidocaine patches up to four times daily in an 18-hour span (six hours off) for three weeks. Dose increases in prior stabilized analgesic therapy and new analgesic therapy were not allowed. Patients at one of three participating institutions were treated for an additional five weeks, during which taper of concomitant analgesic therapy was allowed. At week 3, 70% of patients showed a significant reduction of at least 30% in weekly mean pain diary ratings. Results were similar among patients with and without allodyna. QOL likewise showed significant improvement as measured by Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) total and subcategory scores, as well as the Beck Inventory Depression (BID) score and scores on several ca Continue reading >>

Lidocaine Attenuates The Development Of Diabetic-induced Tactile Allodynia By Inhibiting Microglial Activation.

Lidocaine Attenuates The Development Of Diabetic-induced Tactile Allodynia By Inhibiting Microglial Activation.

Lidocaine attenuates the development of diabetic-induced tactile allodynia by inhibiting microglial activation. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan. Anesth Analg. 2011 Oct;113(4):941-6. doi: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31822827a2. Epub 2011 Jul 25. BACKGROUND: Lidocaine is used clinically for tactile allodynia associated with diabetes-induced neuropathy. Although the analgesic effect of lidocaine through suppression of microglial activation has been implicated in the development of injury-induced neuropathic pain, its mechanism of action in diabetes-induced tactile allodynia has not yet been completely elucidated. METHODS: To evaluate the effects of lidocaine on microglial response in diabetic neuropathy, streptozotocin (STZ)-injected mice received a continuous infusion of lidocaine (vehicle, 2, or 10%) from day 14 to day 21 after STZ injection. On day 21, microglial accumulation and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the dorsal horn were evaluated. In vitro, the effects of lidocaine on cell viability, chemotactic response to monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and induction of proinflammatory mediators were examined in interferon (IFN)--stimulated primary microglial cells. RESULTS: Continuous systemic administration of lidocaine in the early progression of tactile allodynia produced long-lasting analgesic effects in STZ-treated mice. Lidocaine significantly reduced accumulation and p38 phosphorylation of microglial cells in the dorsal horn. In vitro, lidocaine down-regulated IFN--induced gene induction of inducible oxide synthase and interleukin-1. Pretreatment with lidocaine significantly reduced chemotactic response to monocyte chemotactic protein-1 of IFN--activated Continue reading >>

Use Of Topical Lidocaine To Reduce Pain In Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy

Use Of Topical Lidocaine To Reduce Pain In Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Use of Topical Lidocaine to Reduce Pain in Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01086150 Verified December 2010 by Albany Medical College. Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information The purpose of this study is to see if an investigational drug known as the lidocaine 5% patch is safe and effective in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, to examine how topical lidocaine affects the nerve endings, and to determine whether treatment with the lidocaine patch can prevent the potential progression to chronic diabetic neuropathy pain in subjects who did not report pain at the start of the study. Use of Topical Lidocaine (Lidoderm 5% Patch) to Reduce Pain in Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy: Does the Density and Subtype of Sodium Channels Affect Response? Subjects 18 to 70 years of age, non-diabetic with no nervous system disease Skin biopsy specimens will processed and analyzed for Nerve fiber count, nerve and skin morphology, and sodium channel specific epitope expression in keratinocytes. Type I or Type II diabetes with painful diabetic neuropathy 18 to 70 years old with significantly painful diabetic neuropathy Skin biopsy specimens will be processed and analyzed for nerve fiber count, nerve and skin morphology and sodium channel specific epitope expression in keratinocytes. 18 to 70 years of age with Type I o Continue reading >>

Local Anesthesia With Epinephrine Is Safe And Effective For Oral Surgery In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Coronary Disease: A Prospective Randomized Study

Local Anesthesia With Epinephrine Is Safe And Effective For Oral Surgery In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Coronary Disease: A Prospective Randomized Study

Local anesthesia with epinephrine is safe and effective for oral surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary disease: a prospective randomized study We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo Local anesthesia with epinephrine is safe and effective for oral surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary disease: a prospective randomized study Marcela Alves dos Santos-Paul, Itamara Lucia Itagiba Neves, [...], and Jos Antonio Franchini Ramires To investigate the variations in blood glucose levels, hemodynamic effects and patient anxiety scores during tooth extraction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM and coronary disease under local anesthesia with 2% lidocaine with or without epinephrine. This is a prospective randomized study of 70 patients with T2DM with coronary disease who underwent oral surgery. The study was double blind with respect to the glycemia measurements. Blood glucose levels were continuously monitored for 24 hours using the MiniMed Continuous Glucose Monitoring System. Patients were randomized into two groups: 35 patients received 5.4 mL of 2% lidocaine, and 35 patients received 5.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Hemodynamic parameters (blood pressure and heart rate) and anxiety levels were also evaluated. There was no difference in blood glucose levels between the groups Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain affects the functionality, mood, and sleep patterns of approximately 10 to 20 percent of patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment goals include restoring function and improving pain control. Patients can realistically expect a 30 to 50 percent reduction in discomfort with improved functionality. The main classes of agents used to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain include tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, opiates and opiate-like substances, and topical medications. Physicians should ask patients whether they have tried complementary and alternative medicine therapies for their pain. Only two medications are approved specifically for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: pregabalin and duloxetine. However, evidence supports the use of other therapies, and unless there are contraindications, tricyclic antidepressants are the first-line treatment. Because patients often have multiple comorbidities, physicians must consider potential adverse effects and possible drug interactions before prescribing a medication. Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, occurring in 30 to 50 percent of patients with the disease.1 It involves the loss of sensation in a symmetric stocking-and-glove distribution, starting in the toes and progressing proximally. Approximately 10 to 20 percent of patients with diabetes have diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, which is a burning, tingling, or aching discomfort that worsens at night.1,2 Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain may also experience allodynia and hyperalgesia. Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain interferes with sleep quality, mood, and activity level. Initial management goals Continue reading >>

More in diabetes