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Diabetes And Kidneys Pain

Symptoms Of Kidney Disease In Diabetes

Symptoms Of Kidney Disease In Diabetes

According to the National Kidney Foundation about 10-40 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes will develop kidney failure in their lifetime. Kidney disease, often referred to as nephropathy, is one of the many long-term complications of diabetes. Excess glucose in the blood can damage the delicate, small blood vessels in the kidneys that filter the toxins from our bodies. As a result, the kidneys cannot clean your blood properly and a build up of waste materials, water and salt can remain in your blood. The kidneys don't just fail all at once; instead the disease is progressive and can take years to develop. The good news is if it is caught early, it can be treated and further damage can be slowed. There are 5 stages of kidney disease, depending on the severity of the disease. For more information about the stages of kidney disease, you can read on here: Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease Some people do not experience any symptoms of kidney disease and instead, it is picked up on a blood test. If you have diabetes, your doctor should check for signs of kidney disease using a blood and urine sample about once per year. These are routine tests. If, however, you do experience symptoms of kidney disease, the symptoms are caused by either a build up of waste or fluid in the body or anemia. Symptoms of Kidney Disease in Diabetes Swelling or puffiness. This is called edema. It most commonly occurs in they legs, ankles and feet, but can also occur around the eyes, abdomen and less often in other parts of the body. Trouble urinating (either being unable to go, or going more than usual). Sometimes pain or burning can occur with urination. The urine could also be foamy, bloody or dark. Protein aversion: no longer wanting to eat meat. Fatigue, being unable to concentrate, or tiring Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

What is diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease is a type of kidney disease caused by diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. About 1 out of 4 adults with diabetes has kidney disease.1 The main job of the kidneys is to filter wastes and extra water out of your blood to make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure and make hormones that your body needs to stay healthy. When your kidneys are damaged, they can’t filter blood like they should, which can cause wastes to build up in your body. Kidney damage can also cause other health problems. Kidney damage caused by diabetes usually occurs slowly, over many years. You can take steps to protect your kidneys and to prevent or delay kidney damage. What are other names for diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease is also called DKD, chronic kidney disease, CKD, kidney disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can damage the blood vessels in your kidneys. When the blood vessels are damaged, they don’t work as well. Many people with diabetes also develop high blood pressure, which can also damage your kidneys. Learn more about high blood pressure and kidney disease. What increases my chances of developing diabetic kidney disease? Having diabetes for a longer time increases the chances that you will have kidney damage. If you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop kidney disease if your blood glucose is too high blood pressure is too high African Americans, American Indians, and Hispanics/Latinos develop diabetes, kidney disease, and kidney failure at a higher rate than Caucasians. You are also more likely to develop kidney disease if you have diabetes and smoke don’t follow your di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Stones

Diabetes And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are bits of grit formed from minerals in the urine. They can be terribly painful, block urine flow, and damage kidneys. Diabetes is a major risk factor for kidney stones. Stones start out small, like grains of sand. They may hurt, but they will pass by themselves. When they get larger than about 4 millimeters (about 0.2 inches) in diameter, they can get stuck in the ureters, the urine passageways. Then they can become agonizing, cause infection, and block urine in the kidney. This is a very serious complication. Intense kidney stone pain is usually felt in the flank, the side of the mid- to lower back where the stone is. When pain is severe, it can cause vomiting leading to dehydration. These are serious problems for anyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Kidney stones can form from several different minerals. The two main categories are calcium stones and uric acid stones. People with diabetes have higher rates of both, and much higher rates for the uric acid kind, because their urine tends to be more acidic. One study at the Mayo Clinic followed 3,500 patients for 20 years and concluded that those with diabetes developed 40% more uric acid kidney stones than those without diabetes Scientists don’t know why diabetic urine is more acid. The American Society of Nephrology says insulin resistance has something to do with it. High levels of insulin in the blood are associated with acid urine. Bodies make buffers such as ammonium to neutralize the acid, and insulin resistance seems to lower the production of ammonium. Other risk factors for stones include fatness, urinary tract infections, not drinking enough water, gastric bypass surgery, and high salt intake. Preventing stones Most kidney stone prevention focuses on diet. The best supported resul Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nephropathy?

What Is Diabetic Nephropathy?

Diabetic nephropathy refers to kidney disease that occurs in people with diabetes. The kidneys help regulate the amount of fluids and salts in the body, which helps to control blood pressure and releases different types of hormones. Nephropathy is the term used when the kidneys start to incur damage, which can ultimately lead to kidney failure. In this article, we look at the link between diabetes and kidney failure. Contents of this article: What is diabetic nephropathy? Kidney problems are relatively common in people with diabetes. This is because diabetes affects the arteries in the body and the kidney filters blood from those arteries. It is estimated that around 40 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes develop nephropathy. People with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can be affected by nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of long-term kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which is when the kidneys no longer work well enough to meet the needs of daily life. There are five stages of diabetic nephropathy, and ESRD is the last. Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of ESRD in the United States, with between 40 and 50 percent of all ESRD cases directly related to it. A person with ESRD will require dialysis. Causes Diabetic nephropathy is when the kidneys become leaky, allowing albumin (a protein made by the liver) to pass into the urine. The condition worsens as the level of albumin increases. Diabetic nephropathy develops slowly and is more common in people who have had diabetes for 20 years or more. Diabetic nephropathy is more likely to develop in people with diabetes who also have higher blood glucose levels. Doctors also believe that nephropathy is directly influenced by high blood pressure (hypertension), which may Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

One of the causes of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. There is no cure, and treatment must become ever more aggressive as the kidneys deteriorate towards failure. Treatment options include medications, dialysis and kidney transplant. On this page: The main job of the kidneys is to remove waste from the blood and return the cleaned blood back to the body. Kidney failure means the kidneys are no longer able to remove waste and maintain the level of fluid and salts that the body needs. One cause of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. This eventually leads to kidney failure. Around 20 to 30 per cent of people with diabetes develop kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), although not all of these will progress to kidney failure. A person with diabetes is susceptible to nephropathy whether they use insulin or not. The risk is related to the length of time the person has diabetes. There is no cure for diabetic nephropathy, and treatment is lifelong. Another name for the condition is diabetic glomerulosclerosis. People with diabetes are also at risk of other kidney problems, including narrowing of the arteries to the kidneys, called renal artery stenosis or renovascular disease. Symptoms of kidney failure For people with diabetes, kidney problems are usually picked up during a check-up by their doctor. Occasionally, a person can have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. This means their unchecked high blood sugar levels may be Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic kidney disease is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. It can progress to kidney failure in some cases. Treatment aims to prevent or delay the progression of the disease. Also, it aims to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke which are much more common than average in people with this disease. To find out more about the kidneys and urine see also separate leaflet called The Kidneys and Urinary Tract. What is diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. In this condition the filters of the kidneys, the glomeruli, become damaged. Because of this the kidneys 'leak' abnormal amounts of protein from the blood into the urine. The main protein that leaks out from the damaged kidneys is called albumin. In normal healthy kidneys only a tiny amount of albumin is found in the urine. A raised level of albumin in the urine is the typical first sign that the kidneys have become damaged by diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is divided into two main categories, depending on how much albumin is lost through the kidneys: Microalbuminuria: in this condition, the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is between 30 and 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called incipient nephropathy. Proteinuria: in this condition the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is more than 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called macroalbuminuria or overt nephropathy. How does diabetic kidney disease develop and progress? A raised blood sugar (glucose) level that occurs in people with diabetes can cause a rise in the level of some chemicals within the kidney. These chemicals tend to make the glomeruli more 'leaky' which then allows albumin to lea Continue reading >>

Bladder & Kidneys

Bladder & Kidneys

Kidney and bladder damage is a complication of diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk of bladder and kidney infections, kidney failure and dialysis Maintaining good blood glucose control and keeping your blood pressure at a healthy level will reduce this risk Annual kidney health checks are recommended Kidney Disease Kidney disease occurs when the nephrons inside your kidneys, which act as blood filters, are damaged. This leads to the build up of waste and fluids inside the body. If kidney disease is not diagnosed, it can lead to serious complications including kidney failure, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant to keep you alive. Kidney disease and diabetes Each kidney contains up to one million nephrons, the filtering units of the kidneys. Inside a nephron is a tiny set of looping blood vessels called the glomerulus. Diabetes can damage the kidney filters, leading to diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy. If kidney disease is found early, medication, dietary and lifestyle changes can increase the life of your kidneys and keep you feeling your best for as long as possible. Symptoms In some cases diabetic kidney disease causes the kidney filters to become blocked and stop working, which results in kidney failure. Symptoms of kidney failure may be general and can include: changes in the amount and number of times urine is passed blood in the urine tiredness loss of appetite difficulty sleeping headaches lack of concentration shortness of breath nausea and vomiting Controlling blood sugar levels can slow down the development of diabetic kidney disease. Kidney health check It is very important that diabetic kidney disease is detected early as treatment can help to increase the life of the kidneys. Your health care team can give you practical advic Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diabetes is a disease that is caused by the lack of insulin in the body or the body's inability to properly use normal amounts of insulin. The body converts the food we eat into sugar (glucose). The body needs this sugar, in the form of energy, to perform its functions. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, regulates the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. If the body lacks insulin or does not use the insulin properly, then this imbalance results in high blood sugar. Eventually many unhealthy changes can occur in different body organs, including the kidneys. How diabetes affects the kidneys Damage to blood vessels Even with the use of injected insulin, people who have had diabetes for some time often suffer from damage to the small blood vessels of the body. This may cause damage to the retina of the eye and result in loss of vision. Also, the delicate blood vessels in the filters of the kidney may be damaged. At the early stage, this damage is shown by finding protein in the urine. Sometimes at a later stage, so much protein is lost from the blood that water from the blood moves into the body tissues and causes swelling (edema). After a number of years, the kidneys' filters can become so damaged by diabetes that the kidneys fail. Damage to nerves Diabetes can also damage the nerves in many parts of the body. When the bladder is affected, it may be difficult to pass urine. The pressure from urine building up in the bladder can damage the kidneys. Infections The urine of people with diabetes has a high sugar content. This encourages the growth of bacteria and kidney infections may occur. People with diabetes must take special care to avoid infections and have them treated immediately. Types of diabetes There are several types of diabetes. The most common one Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic Nephropathy

Overview Diabetic nephropathy is a serious kidney-related complication of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. It is also called diabetic kidney disease. Up to 40 percent of people with diabetes eventually develop kidney disease. Diabetic nephropathy affects the ability of your kidneys to do their usual work of removing waste products and extra fluid from your body. The best way to prevent or delay diabetic nephropathy is by maintaining a healthy lifestyle and treating your diabetes and high blood pressure. Over many years, the condition slowly damages your kidneys' delicate filtering system. Early treatment may prevent or slow disease progression and reduce the chance of complications. Your kidney disease may progress to kidney failure, also called end-stage kidney disease. Kidney failure is a life-threatening condition. At this stage your treatment options are dialysis or a kidney transplant. Symptoms In the early stages of diabetic nephropathy, you may not notice any signs or symptoms. In later stages, the signs and symptoms include: Worsening blood pressure control Protein in the urine Swelling of feet, ankles, hands or eyes Increased need to urinate Less need for insulin or diabetes medicine Confusion or difficulty concentrating Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting Persistent itching Fatigue When to see a doctor Make an appointment with your doctor if you have any signs or symptoms of kidney disease. If you have diabetes, visit your doctor yearly for a urine test that detects protein. This helps determine how well the kidneys are functioning. Causes Diabetic nephropathy results when diabetes damages blood vessels and other cells in your kidneys. How the kidneys work Your kidneys contain millions of tiny blood vessel clusters (glomeruli) that filter waste from your Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes mellitus, usually called diabetes, is a disease in which your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood. A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common, usually occurs in people over 40 and is called adult onset diabetes mellitus. It is also called non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In Type 2, your pancreas makes insulin, but your body does not use it properly. The high blood sugar level often can be controlled by following a diet and/or taking medication, although some patients must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent among African Americans, American Indians, Latin Americans and Asian Americans. With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood. Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that h Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Problems

Diabetic Kidney Problems

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste and fluids build up in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It begins long before you have symptoms. People with diabetes should get regular screenings for kidney disease. Tests include a urine test to detect protein in your urine and a blood test to show how well your kidneys are working. If the damage continues, your kidneys could fail. In fact, diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. People with kidney failure need either dialysis or a kidney transplant. You can slow down kidney damage or keep it from getting worse. Controlling your blood sugar and blood pressure, taking your medicines and not eating too much protein can help. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Unfortunately, renal failure or nephropathy (commonly referred to as kidney failure) and unmanaged diabetes go hand in hand. In addition, 50 percent of people with diabetes will experience some form of kidney damage in their lifetime, even if they never experience kidney failure or end up on dialysis. In this article, we will look at how renal failure and insufficiency can have an impact on people with diabetes, and how people with diabetes can avoid renal failure and dialysis. We will look at risk factors, causes, and symptoms, as we explore the relationship between renal failure, diabetes, and high blood glucose. We will also look at what happens to a person with diabetes when their kidneys fail. We will discuss dialysis and kidney transplantation. First, let’s see what Lydia had to say when she contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Lydia’s story Lydia had received a laboratory result from her doctor that was very alarming to her. She had an excess amount of protein in her urine, usually an early sign of kidney damage. He informed Lydia that her kidneys were being affected by her diabetes, and she needed to work on self-managing her diabetes. He ordered some more tests to further look at her kidneys. Was Lydia headed to the kidney dialysis center? Her friend Tracey, whom she’d met in a diabetes support group had been the first person she knew who was on dialysis. Tracey seemed to have a very difficult life in and out of the dialysis center. Lydia was afraid to end up like Tracey. Lydia knew that she hadn’t been efficiently self-managing her diabetes. Her A1C had been greater than 8 percent a few times over the last few years. While most of the time she kept it around 7.5 percent, she was aware that her doctor wanted her to get it below 7 percent, and keep it there in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Type 2 Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Nephropathy, or kidney disease, is among the most serious complications for many people with diabetes. It’s the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 465,000 Americans have end-stage kidney disease and are living by means of dialysis. Nephropathy has few early symptoms or warning signs, similar to other diseases associated with type 2 diabetes. Damage to the kidneys from nephropathy can occur for as long as a decade before the first symptoms appear. According to Dr. Charles M. Clark, Jr., M.D., former chairman of the National Diabetes Education Program, “A person can have type 2 diabetes for 9 to 12 years before it’s discovered. During those years, harmful changes are already occurring, causing 5 to 10 percent to [already] have kidney disease at the time of diagnosis.” Often, no symptoms of kidney disease appear until the kidneys are no longer functioning properly. Symptoms that indicate your kidneys could be at risk include: fluid retention swelling of the feet, ankles, and legs a poor appetite feeling exhausted and weak most of the time frequent headaches upset stomach nausea vomiting insomnia difficulty concentrating Early diagnosis of kidney disease is essential for preserving good health. If you have prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, or other known diabetes risk factors, your kidneys are already overworked and their function should be tested annually. Besides diabetes, other risk factors for kidney disease are: uncontrolled high blood pressure uncontrolled high blood glucose obesity high cholesterol a family history of kidney disease a family history of heart disease cigarette smoking advanced age A higher prevalence of kidney disease exists among: African-Americans American Indians Hispanic Americans Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts* *Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts Medically Edited by: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stoppler, MD Medical Editor: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Proper nutrition is essential for anyone living with diabetes. Control of blood glucose levels is only one goal of a healthy eating plan for people with diabetes. A diet for those with diabetes should also help achieve and maintain a normal body weight as well as prevent heart and vascular disease, which are frequent complications of diabetes. There is no prescribed diet plan for those with diabetes. Rather, eating plans are tailored to fit an individual's needs, schedules, and eating habits. A diabetes diet plan must also be balanced with the intake of insulin and oral diabetes medications. In general, the principles of a healthy diabetes diet are the same for everyone. Consumption of a variety of foods including whole grains, fruits, non-fat dairy products, beans, and lean meats or vegetarian substitutes, poultry and fish is recommended to achieve a healthy diet. Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes. Kidney failure is the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 44 percent of new cases. Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. Most people with diabetes do not develop chronic kidney disease that is severe enough to progress to kidney failure. Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and nearly 200,000 people are living with kidney failure a Continue reading >>

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