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Diabetes And Itchy Skin

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Skin Problems: Its Symptoms, Conditions Pictures

Diabetic Skin Problems: Its Symptoms, Conditions Pictures

Diabetes often termed as the blood-related disorder where the metabolism gets affects, renders a whole lot of complications in the long run. With the initial signs just affecting the blood sugar and glucose levels, one might tend to think that it will easily go off the boil. However, that’s the exact opposite of what occurs. Diabetes when uncontrolled for induces different complications around the body, in the ilk of the eye, kidney, heart and much more. A peculiar condition not spoken of much when the talk of diabetic complications arise is the skin disease or skin problems. Skin problems can be a potential hazard for the body and can cause multiple complications around. We here would look to seek answers for the diabetic skin problems arising in the individual as part of our informative series. Join in as we go through the ‘List of Diabetic Skin Problems, Symptoms & Conditions’. But before we go, how about we look into the relation between diabetes and skin problems. List of Diabetic Skin Problems with pictures The Peculiar relation between Diabetes and Skin Problems As per the facts, around one-third of diabetic cases see skin related problems later in their life. That speaks of how these two are interrelated to some extent. In fact, many skin problems serve as an initial reminder or warning signs for diabetes. A timely diagnosis and cure for the diabetes case will help curb the skin problems once and for all. Controlling diabetes is what one can do to control the skin problems in the body. List of Diabetic Skin Problems with pictures 1. Necrobiosis Lipoidica (Yellow or brown patch on the skin) This skin condition renders small bumps which are in raised form on the skin. These often look like pimples and progresses along to become patches of hard and swollen sk Continue reading >>

Common Skin Conditions For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Common Skin Conditions For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Common skin conditions for people with type 2 diabetes People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing skin problems , or from complications of skin problems that have not been spotted soon enough, often because of reduced skin sensation. Most skin conditions can be prevented and successfully treated if caught early. However, if not cared for properly, a minor skin condition in a person with diabetes can turn into a serious problem with potentially severe consequences. Scleroderma diabeticorum : This condition causes a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. This condition is rare but can affect people with type 2 diabetes . The treatment involves bringing your blood glucose level under control. Lotions and moisturisers may help soften the skin. Diabetic dermopathy: Also called shin spots, this condition develops as a result of changes to the blood vessels that supply the skin. Dermopathy appears as a shiny round or oval lesion of thin skin over the front lower parts of the lower legs. The patches do not hurt, although rarely they can be itchy or cause burning. Treatment is usually not necessary. Diabetic blisters (bullosis diabeticorum): In rare cases, people with diabetes develop blisters that resemble burn blisters. These blisters can occur on the fingers, hands, toes , feet , legs or forearms. Diabetic blisters are usually painless and heal on their own. They often occur in people who have severe diabetes and diabetic neuropathy . Bringing your blood glucose level under control is the treatment for this condition. Disseminated granuloma annulare : This condition causes sharply defined, ring or arc-shaped areas on the skin. These rashes most often occur on the fingers and ears , but they can occur on the chest and abdomen . The ras Continue reading >>

Diabetes Itchy Skin | No 8 Of 10 Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Itchy Skin | No 8 Of 10 Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes

Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes – Skin Changes Diabetes itchy skin symptoms are often overlooked and not seen as early Type 2 diabetes symptoms since skin changes are sometimes considered to be normal. Itchy skin, particularly in the lower legs, can be caused by dryness, poor circulation, or yeast infections. Itching skin can also be called pruritus. The nerve damage caused by diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy, may stop diabetics from sweating. Decreased sweating can lead to dry skin. Poor blood flow, a common complication of diabetes can contribute to dry and itchy skin. Circulation problems that restrict blood flow to the legs and feet slow healing of the skin. High blood sugar causes the body to lose fluid. This occurs because the body is turning the water into urine to remove the excess sugar from the blood. The diabetes symptoms of frequent urination as well as dry and itchy skin are a result of this process. Dry skin can become itchy and can crack, causing you to scratch. Breaks in the skin allow germs to enter and cause infection. This can become a vicious cycle with skin that never heals properly. Since the skin is the largest organ in the body, it is important for your health and comfort to take care of your skin and take symptoms seriously. ‘ Prevent Skin Irritation Having healthy skin requires caring for its environment both inside and out. The most important thing you can do is regulate blood sugar levels in the normal range to prevent the symptoms and complications of diabetes. From the outside in, you can bathe or shower in warm water that is not too hot. This will help prevent dry and itchy skin. Use gentle cleansers or soaps and when you dry off – be gentle. Don’t rub your skin dry, just pat. Consider adding moisture to the air in your home wit Continue reading >>

Barely Scratching The Surface

Barely Scratching The Surface

Itching or pruritus is an unpleasant sensation that evokes the desire or reflex to scratch. Itching in people with diabetes for the most part suggests a skin condition such as psoriasis, eczema, sunburn, athlete's foot, hidradenitis suppurativa, pruritus vulvae from monilial infections, xerosis and diabetic eczema, necrobiosis diabeticorum, allergies to medications, drug eruptions, and many other conditions. Most are inflammatory disorders. In addition, there are generalized medical conditions that need to be excluded such as obstructive jaundice (bilirubin is a skin irritant at high concentrations), polycythemia that can cause generalized itching, myxedema, hypoparathyroidism, uremia, iron deficiency anemia, and malignancy or systemic internal cancers such as lymphoma or Hodgkin's disease (1). When all have been considered and excluded, the question that needs to be answered is, Does the itching derive from a peripheral or a central mechanism? Sensations associated with scratching Pain and itch have very different behavioral response patterns. Pain evokes a withdrawal reflex that leads to retraction and is therefore a reaction trying to protect an endangered part of the body. Itch creates a scratch reflex that draws one to the affected skin site (2). It has been hypothesized that motivational aspects of scratching include the frontal brain areas of reward and decision making. These aspects might therefore contribute to the compulsive nature of itch and scratching (2). It is clear, therefore, that itching is not skin-deep. Unmyelinated nerve fibers for itch and pain both originate in the skin; however, information for them is conveyed centrally in two distinct systems that both use the same peripheral nerve bundle and spinothalamic tract (3). It is surprising, then, tha Continue reading >>

Metformin And Itching

Metformin And Itching

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi! I know this sounds like a crazy thread, but I'm going to put this out there to all of you in hopes that someone else may have experienced this too.. I survived the first week on metformin. It was TOUGH as I had non stop nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, but I got through it and all my GI symptoms have disappeared. But now, I am experiencing EXTREME itching. I don't have hives, but the itching is 24/7 and it is intense. It is not just the dry skin of winter either. This is the kind of itching that causes you to scratch until you bleed.... I decided not to take my metfomin last night and I didn't take my morning dose and the itching has subsided greatly. I am allergic to many other medications, but they cause me to break out into red itchy hives. I don't have hives, just miserable all over my body itching!!! I have used nothing different since I have been on the metformin. All lotions, soaps, etc. are all the same. The only thing new in my life is the metformin. I can't take Benedryl as it knocks me out for hours. I didn't think of the Claritin, but that is worth a try!!! As for keeping my skin moisturized, I use a moisturizing shower gel and baby oil gel as soon as I get out of the shower. Dry skin is not the problem. This is the type of itching that makes you want scratch your skin off. This is oh my gosh, if I don't scratch, I'm going to rip someone's head off itching. I'd put a call in to your doc before they leave for the weekend. If you're having this much problem with the metformin, you may not be able to tolerate it. If you don't hear from your doc today, i'd suggest stopping the metfo Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin During Pregnancy Should Not Be Ignored

Itchy Skin During Pregnancy Should Not Be Ignored

When she was pregnant with her first child, Kim Viscio, then 37, noticed an incessant itch on the soles of her feet, something she first chalked up to a new pair of Ugg boots. “My feet were really itchy — distractingly itchy,” Viscio, of Warminster Pennsylvania, told Fox News. Since the itchiness came and went, she didn’t give it much thought until it spread to her hands and throughout her body, getting increasingly worse. She thought dry skin could be the culprit, so she changed her soap and applied lotion, but nothing helped. “It kept on getting more and more uncomfortable,” she recalled. After a few weeks, she decided something wasn’t right and did what most moms do — turn to Google. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), a liver disorder that causes the liver to secret bile acids into the blood stream and can lead to stillbirth, came up in the results. “I felt in my gut that this was it,” she said. Thirty-two weeks pregnant, Viscio immediately called her midwife, who also suspected ICP and told her to come in right away for blood work. After a week, she received results that showed that she not only had ICP but her case was severe. A level of 10 or 14 mg/dl total bile acids indicates a woman has the condition and 40 mg/dl is a severe case. Viscio’s level was 103. “I remember the feeling of devastation. You feel like, ‘I’ve come this far with the pregnancy and now I might lose my baby,’” she said. What is ICP? ICP is an uncommon liver disorder that affects 1 to 2 out of 1,000 pregnancies in the United States. The main symptom of ICP is itchy hands and feet, but women with the disorder may also have nausea, fatigue, lack of appetite, pale stools, dark urine, malaise and a mild depression. Because the itching can show up anywhere i Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

New Anti-itch Lotion For Diabetics' Skin

New Anti-itch Lotion For Diabetics' Skin

Diabetes can affect your skin by drying it out and causing itchy, dry patches. New Cortizone 10 Anti-Itch Lotion for Diabetics' Skin is clinically tested* and specifically formulated for diabetics' itchy skin. It relieves skin symptoms fast with 1% hydrocortisone, the strongest non-prescription itch medicine. Try Cortizone 10 Anti-Itch Lotion for Diabetics' Skin for fast, non-irritating itch relief. Cortizone 10 Anti-Itch Lotion for Diabetics' Skin provides long lasting relief to soothe dry, irritated skin and is formulated to be Diabetics' Skin friendly with the following benefits: Available Sizes: 3.4 oz tube Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Eczema (itchy Skin): What’s The Connection, Complications & Treatment

Diabetes & Eczema (itchy Skin): What’s The Connection, Complications & Treatment

Diabetes is today affecting a large population of people across the world. There are two things which are mainly responsible for the disease. The first is the lack of proper production of insulin by the pancreas or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This, in turn, gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body. Insulin is a very important hormone to keep the body running and is hugely responsible for the energy that is utilized by our cells. Diabetes is something that should be handled with great care. There are several precautions which need to be maintained along with the disease. It is only through a proper lifestyle, a healthy diet, and other measures that the disease can be kept under control. Not only this, what makes the disease highly complicated and feared for is the numerous other adverse health effects that it brings along with it. A few of them include heart and kidney disorders. Skin disorders like eczema are also very common in patients with diabetes. Eczema causes a lot of skin irritation and itching and hence should be avoided in all circumstances. In this article, we will try to find out the answer to the relation between diabetes and eczema. We will first try to understand the meaning, causes, and symptoms of eczema and then deeply analyze the close interconnection between diabetes and the skin disorder. We shall further deep dive into understanding the complications and the treatment which can help cure eczema. Hence, let us now explore the article: ‘Diabetes and Eczema: What’s the connection, complications, and treatment’. Understanding Eczema Before we analyze and try to understand the connection and interlink between diabetes and eczema, let us first understand the very meaning of the word eczema and i Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Say Goodbye To Dry Skin

Say Goodbye To Dry Skin

Say Goodbye to Dry Skin Everyone gets dry skin from time to time. But for people with diabetes, it can be a chronic problem if your blood glucose levels are regularly high. High blood glucose causes the body to lose fluids at a faster rate. Skin can also become dry when nerves are damaged from years of diabetes and don't get the message to sweat. For people with diabetes, dry skin can become more than an irritation -- it can be dangerous. When skin is dry, it sloughs off easier, and often the outer layer is lost. This outer layer is your skin's first defense against bacteria and acts as a barrier. And because bacteria feed on glucose, people with diabetes whose blood glucose isn't in control have a higher risk of bacterial infection -- the bacteria are literally on a feeding frenzy in the higher glucose levels. That's why even the tiniest cut can become a major infection when your glucose levels are regularly high. Experts say it's vital to keep a close eye on your skin. If you identify a cut, scratch, or burn early, it's possible to avoid major complications such as an amputation. "Don't wait! Even if a skin condition appears to be minor, see your doctor," says Fran Cook-Bolden, M.D., clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University in New York City. Signs of Skin Problems Many skin conditions associated with high blood glucose levels cause changes in your skin's color, texture, or pigmentation. Watch for: Dull red raised areas. Light brown scaly patches, rashes, and depressions or bumps at injection sites if you take insulin. Dry skin. Skin on your legs that becomes hairless, thin, cool, and shiny (signs of thickening arteries and poor circulation). Moist, red itchy areas surrounded by tiny blisters and scales (sign of fungal infection). Controlled Glucose Mea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

If you have diabetic skin problems, like itchy skin, it's important to care for your skin properly – read on for tips to add to your skin care regime! If you have diabetes then you’re more likely to have dry skin, which can lead to itchiness. Are you one of those who suffer with diabetes and itchy skin? Itchy skin and diabetes often go together. The good news is that by taking care of your skin, you may be able to help reduce the risk of developing skin problems due to dryness and maintain healthy-looking, smooth skin. 1 Itchy skin, diabetes related or not, can often be made worse by washing with the wrong skin care products that increase skin dryness. Although you might think you’re doing the right thing by keeping your skin clean, if you’re using the wrong products, or washing too frequently, then you can actually aggravate the problem. Try to use mild and gentle soaps that are free from harsh chemicals and heavy perfumes. Unless it’s necessary, don’t wash your skin more than twice a day – washing too often, especially with hot water, can actually dry the skin out more. Avoiding these triggers may help to minimize itchiness. 2 If you’ve got diabetes, itchy skin due to dryness can be a concern. A good moisturizer like Vaseline® Intensive Care™ Advanced Repair Unscented Lotion may help to soothe and relieve itchiness. With micro-droplets of Vaseline® Jelly and glycerin, this lotion locks in essential moisture to help facilitate the skin’s natural recovery process. It’s fast absorbing and gentle on skin. Moisturizing can help to calm your dry skin and may reduce the urge to scratch. Remember, even though dry, itchy skin can be uncomfortable, always try your best to avoid scratching as this can lead to skin becoming damaged. If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

Diseases That Cause Itchy Skin

Diseases That Cause Itchy Skin

Diseases that cause itchy skin - If you’ve had a skin condition for more than 7-10 days and have been unable to isolate the cause, there could be an underlying illness that’s gone undetected. 1 Have Enlarged Prostate? Find out how much water you should be drinking plus more natural prostate solutions Newsmax Health 2 5 Worst Arthritis Foods Limit these foods to decrease arthritis pain and inflammation. naturalhealthreports.net Here’s a brief list of common diseases that cause itchy skin or rashes, cracking, flaking, redness and irritation....... Autoimmune Disorders: When the immune system begins to attack itself, this causes itching along with pain and sometimes difficulty breathing. Cancer: Skin cancer may itch, and various forms of cancer like leukemia, lung cancer, and prostrate cancer may all cause skin irritation Diabetes: Diabetes and itchy skin is pretty common. Diabetes can cause a variety of conditions including: bacterial infections that become red, hot, swollen and itchy; fungal infections (like athletes foot or yeast infections); diabetic dermopathy (light brown patches that flake or scale); diabetic blisters and atherosclerosis. Kidney Failure: When your kidneys cannot get rid of waste, the entire body becomes fatigued and skin begins to itch. Other symptoms are flu-like nausea and on-going weight loss. Liver Disease: Liver diseases very often cause itching. While doctors aren’t certain as to why, they believe the various toxins accumulating in the blood when the liver functions poorly may produce the itching. Liver diseases are often accompanied by nausea and weariness. Thyroid Disease: Along with weight gain or loss, thyroid disease can manifest into itchy skin. Menopause: While menopause is not a disease, hormonal changes - such as the decline i Continue reading >>

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