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Diabetes And Ice Cream

Going To The Grocery Store With Diabetes: The Ice Cream And Frozen Novelty Aisle

Going To The Grocery Store With Diabetes: The Ice Cream And Frozen Novelty Aisle

Yes, it may be one of the colder sections of the grocery store, but the frozen dessert aisle is also the source of happy memories and the centerpiece of many celebrations. For those of us with diabetes, frozen confections were probably one of the first types of food that passed through our minds with a big red X on them as we got the news of our diagnosis. But now we know they don’t need to be condemned. Ice cream and frozen novelties can have a place in the diets of people with diabetes. Let’s discuss a few things about how we can have our ice cream cake and eat it too! First off, ice cream and frozen yogurt — what is the difference? In a blog entry I wrote on my own site a couple years ago, I explain in detail how each differs in calories and carbohydrates. Here is a summary of what I uncovered: Frozen yogurt is not necessarily the best option, especially for people with diabetes. While it is usually low in fat or fat-free, the fat has often been replaced with more sugar to add flavor. Also, frozen yogurt, depending on the brand, can contain unappealing ingredients such as corn syrup, artificial colors, and preservatives. Also, note that soft-serve ice cream is not frozen yogurt, a common point of confusion. Ice cream in all its dairy richness is generally higher in fat and lower in total carbohydrates than its frozen yogurt counterpart, and it is often more natural. I may be a bit biased, but I personally would rather have a bowl of full-fat ice cream that I know will have a more predictable effect on my blood sugar (with a delayed rise due to the fat), rather than a bland frozen yogurt that will spike my numbers more quickly because of the higher sugar and lower fat content. At the end of the day, it is a personal choice. But just know that you can absolutely Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

The other day, after a casual dinner at home, my wife and I went out for ice cream. We'd opted to leave the air-conditioned safety of our home on this 90+ degree day, to head for an ice cream parlor that's just a short stroll from our house. As we stood there pondering the particular ice cream creations that sounded best, I glanced at my Dexcom CGM to see where my blood sugar happened to be and what that would mean for my carb counting and insulin dosing. Seeing a 97 mg/dL on my receiver, I smiled and rattled off the number to my wife who had already moved toward the counter to tell the clerk her decision. I rarely deviate from choosing either a plain scoop of vanilla, or an 'unfancy' single-scoop hot fudge sundae. But in this moment, I decided to go with a single scoop of rocky road, full of chocolatey goodness and riddled with marshmallows and nuts. I was treating myself, after all. A woman nearby had apparently overheard the first part of our conversation and realized I was talking about diabetes. She shot me a look before saying, "You can't eat that!" Without more than a second's hesitation, I shot back a quick, decisive response: "Yes, I can!" That started a back and forth that I would have preferred to avoid, about how this woman was nosing in on a private matter that didn't concern her -- one that she also had no personal insight into and no context as to who I was or how I was managing my diabetes and this particular food choice. It wasn't any of her business in the first place of course, but still she insisted that she knows a lot about diabetes and what PWDs can or cannot eat, since she has family members who happen to live with it. (((sigh))) We in the Diabetes Community know this type of person well. They're referred to as the Diabetes Police, who think they Continue reading >>

Diabetics This Is The Best Type Of Ice Cream For You

Diabetics This Is The Best Type Of Ice Cream For You

Diabetics THIS is the BEST TYPE of ice cream for you Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive. Let's work together to keep the conversation civil. We have sent you a verification email. To verify, just follow the link in the message Share fbshare twshare pinshare Comments (0) Diabetics THIS is the BEST TYPE of ice cream for you TNN | Last updated on - Jun 29, 2018, 17:35 ISTShare fbshare twshare pinshare Comments (0) 01/11Diabetics, you can eat ice cream and THIS is the BEST way to eat it DIABETICS, YOU CAN EAT ICE CREAM AND THIS IS THE BEST WAY TO EAT IT: People who have diabetes usually think ice cream is off limits for them. While it is true since most varieties available in the market are high in sugar, which can raise your blood sugar levels rapidly. Now if you think that ice creams labelled as 'sugar free' have no sugar, the bad news is there arent any such ice creams. The sugar free ones have carbohydrates and naturally occurring sugar, which can raise your blood sugar level. But we have some good news for you. In spite of all the facts mentioned about ice cream above, diabetics can still fit it into their meal plan. 02/11Things to look out for while choosing an ice cream THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR WHILE CHOOSING AN ICE CREAM: The number of choices available in the supermarket are overwhelming as well as misleading. One should definitely opt for low sugar ice cream and for that choose an ice cream which is low in carbs. The best choice would be an ice cream with less than 20 grams of carbs in half cup serving and has no added sugar but only natural sugar Continue reading >>

Best Ice Creams For Diabetics

Best Ice Creams For Diabetics

Best Ice Creams For Diabetics: 5 Questions To Ask Yourself To help you both lower your blood sugar (glucose) and shed excess weight (which is often vital for diabetes control), the faculty at the Pritikin health resort suggest that you ask yourself the following 5 questions: 1 How much am I scooping out? Turn around any container of ice cream and you’ll likely see on the Nutrition Facts label that the serving size is a half cup. A level half cup. That’s the same size as those little single-serving containers of Jello pudding or Activia yogurt. Yep, four or five bites and it’s all over. So unless you’re being really careful (or using teeny-tiny bowls), you’re probably scooping out at least a cup, which means twice the calories, twice the artery clogging saturated fat, and twice the sugar that’s listed on the label. 2 Am I keeping a lid on sugar? It’s difficult to know exactly how much added sugar a serving of ice cream contains because the number you see for grams of sugar on the Nutrition Facts label includes added sugars as well as the naturally-occurring (and Pritikin-friendly) sugars from the milk and fruit ingredients. 100 calories Suffice it to say that if you’re sticking with fat-free ice creams and frozen yogurts that have 100 calories or fewer per serving, you’re probably not getting more than 3 teaspoons of added sugar, point out the Pritikin dietitians in their nutrition workshops at the health resort. But keep in mind that 3 teaspoons of added, refined sugar is still a lot, particularly if you’re concerned about your blood glucose and triglyceride levels, not to mention your waistline. The doctors and dietitians at Pritikin are far from alone in their concerns about added sugars. The American Heart Association now recommends no more than 6 Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Winning Ice Creams

What To Eat With Diabetes: Winning Ice Creams

The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 bes Continue reading >>

Does Eating A Lot Of Ice Cream Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating A Lot Of Ice Cream Cause Diabetes?

Now a year later, we’re again sending the message that ice cream is OK. But more importantly, the message is that myths, stereotypes and misinformation about diabetes really hurt. They hurt fundraising, the general public’s awareness, and the emotions of kids who are made to feel different and that they “can’t do this” simply because of their diabetes. Sure, this DYFI event is a fundraiser to help send type 1 kids to D-Camp. But it’s bigger than that; it’s also about raising general diabetes awareness for everyone. “We can still enjoy every day things, in moderation… and it’s a choice we make, versus a rule to break,” she says. “I really want to focus more on this, to help build awareness in people’s minds even some scared diabetics’ minds that we are not under dietary lock and key, all the time.” Is anyone talking about the best ways to bolus for a bunch of ice cream? I go crazy on a little ice cream every once in a while, but the result is always way out of my normal range. Those that eat low-carb might get more extreme results from an occasional dessert. But, yeah… we can eat whatever we want. Ice cream is not inherently bad for us—it’s nummy! But I don’t equate being able to eat icecream with living a full life. What if you’re allergic to dairy, are you not able to live a full life? My kids have peanut allergy. I bet most of those toppings contain nuts or traces thereof. I love an icecream social but let’s not equate it with being “normal.” Lots of “normal” people can’t eat icecream sundaes. No biggy. Some pwd can’t eat icecream without bs going through the roof. Let’s present this as being about choice and options and managing your own diet as you see fit regardless of media hype and misconceptions about D car Continue reading >>

Expert Advice: Enjoying Ice Cream With Diabetes | Dlife

Expert Advice: Enjoying Ice Cream With Diabetes | Dlife

Expert Advice: Get the Scoop on Ice Cream Summertime, for most, is a time to indulge in cool and tempting treats like ice cream, but it may not be that easy for someone with type 2 diabetes. However, its empowering to know that satisfying your sweet-tooth doesnt have to be completely off limits. We sat down with Dr. Rajsree Nambudripad, an integrative health specialist to get her scoop on ice cream, including what to look for in the ice creams you buy, how to safely integrate them into your diet and the best alternatives. Can someone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes enjoy ice cream? Most ice creams contain a lot of sugar and should only be a rare treat for those with diabetes. Regardless of the effect on blood sugar, Nampudripad says eating sweet things (with true or artificial sugars) do trigger a brain response that can lead to more sugar cravings. In her practice, she generally recommends her patients with diabetes to avoid desserts like ice cream, especially those who require medications or insulin to control their blood sugar. There are some alternatives to ice cream that we will explore below. Things to keep in mind when having ice cream: How will you feel after eating the ice cream? Will the artificial sugars cause bloating? Will you have difficulty controlling the amount you consume? Are there other healthier alternatives to ice cream in general that may be better for your condition? Would an ice cream low in sugar bea good choice? Sugar is the main cause of an insulin-spike in a patient with diabetes, so yes, lower sugar versions are preferred. Do you recommend ice creams made with artificial sweeteners? Generally, Nampudripad avoids ice creams made with artificial sweeteners. First, they dont stop the cycle of sugar cravings that one experiences, she says. The Continue reading >>

Ice Cream For Diabetics That Doesn't Raise Blood Sugar

Ice Cream For Diabetics That Doesn't Raise Blood Sugar

You may think ice cream is off-limits if you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes -- especially since many varieties are high in sugar and cause your blood glucose to rise rapidly. If you're looking for sugar-free varieties that don't raise blood sugar, the bad news is ... there aren't any. You can find ice creams labeled "no sugar added." However, these contain carbohydrates and naturally occurring sugars, which raise blood glucose. The good news is you can still fit ice cream into your diabetes meal plan. Video of the Day No Sugar Added: The Not-So-Sweet Truth The "no sugar added" varieties of ice cream are sweetened with sugar substitutes such as sugar alcohols and sucralose, better known as Splenda. However, this doesn't make them sugar-free. Most "no sugar added" varieties are made using milk, which contains lactose -- a naturally occurring sugar. In addition, some sugar substitutes contribute carbohydrates and raise blood sugar, though not as dramatically as table sugar. What's more, some people find the taste of ice cream sweetened with sugar substitutes unpalatable. It's Not Off-Limits: Here's Why People with diabetes aim to eat a predetermined, consistent amount of carbohydrates at each meal -- 45 to 60 grams is about right for most people, according to the American Diabetes Association. It's common to think that you must avoid all forms of sugar when you have diabetes, but this isn't the case. As long as the total amount of carbs at a given meal remains within your target, you can fit sweet treats in every now and then. Eat sweets with your meal, instead of separately, so that you're consuming nutritious components such as protein and fiber, which help stabilize blood sugar. Make adjustments in your meal when planning to compensate for the ice cream. For e Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Ice Cream?

Can Diabetics Eat Ice Cream?

By The Lifescript Editorial Staff Reviewed by Edward C. Geehr, MD It's getting warmer outside and pretty soon it'll be ice cream weather. But can you still enjoy frozen desserts if you have diabetes? Happily, the answer is yes: You can eat frozen desserts occasionally if you substitute them for other carbohydrates in your meal plan. The following tips from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) can help you choose: Watch the serving size (1/2 cup). If you eat more, double or triple the nutrient information to keep your count accurate. Watch the fat content, particularly the saturated fat. Light ice cream or yogurt contains about half the fat of the regular kind. And remember: Fat-free ice cream still has sugar, carbohydrates and calories. A no-sugar-added frozen dessert may still contain carbohydrate, fat and calories. Sweeteners commonly used in frozen desserts include aspartame and sugar alcohols such as sorbitol. Check your blood glucose after eating a frozen dessert to see how it affects you. To help you navigate your way through calorie-carb-fat counts in desserts, check out our diet ice cream taste test and below, ourfrozen dessert dietary guide. (All measurements are for a 1/2 cup serving): 133 calories, 16 g carbs, 7 g fat, 7 g saturated fat 100 calories, 14 g carbs, 4 g, fat 3 g saturated fat Fat-free ice cream(Lowest in calories and fat!) 90 calories, 20 g carbs, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat No-sugar-added ice cream(Lowest in carbs!) 100 calories, 13 g carbs, 4 g fat, 3 g saturated fat 132 calories, 29 g carbs, 4 g fat, 3 g saturated fat 92 calories, 23 g carbs, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat Reprinted from 101 Nutrition Tips for People with Diabetes by Patti B. Geil and Lea Ann Holzmeister. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All r Continue reading >>

Diabetics This Is The Best Type Of Ice Cream For You

Diabetics This Is The Best Type Of Ice Cream For You

Diabetics THIS is the BEST TYPE of ice cream for you Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive. Let's work together to keep the conversation civil. We have sent you a verification email. To verify, just follow the link in the message Share fbshare twshare pinshare Comments (0) Diabetics THIS is the BEST TYPE of ice cream for you TNN | Last updated on - Jun 29, 2018, 17:35 ISTShare fbshare twshare pinshare Comments (0) 01/11Diabetics, you can eat ice cream and THIS is the BEST way to eat it DIABETICS, YOU CAN EAT ICE CREAM AND THIS IS THE BEST WAY TO EAT IT: People who have diabetes usually think ice cream is off limits for them. While it is true since most varieties available in the market are high in sugar, which can raise your blood sugar levels rapidly. Now if you think that ice creams labelled as 'sugar free' have no sugar, the bad news is there arent any such ice creams. The sugar free ones have carbohydrates and naturally occurring sugar, which can raise your blood sugar level. But we have some good news for you. In spite of all the facts mentioned about ice cream above, diabetics can still fit it into their meal plan. 02/11Things to look out for while choosing an ice cream THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR WHILE CHOOSING AN ICE CREAM: The number of choices available in the supermarket are overwhelming as well as misleading. One should definitely opt for low sugar ice cream and for that choose an ice cream which is low in carbs. The best choice would be an ice cream with less than 20 grams of carbs in half cup serving and has no added sugar but only natural sugar Continue reading >>

Dr. Edelman On How To Eat Ice Cream With Diabetes

Dr. Edelman On How To Eat Ice Cream With Diabetes

Dr. Steve Edelman talks about something most of us love: ice cream. In this episode of The Edelman Report, Dr. Edelman, an endocrinologist living with type 1 diabetes explains how to properly enjoy ice cream with diabetes. As you’ll see below, it has to do with awareness and enjoyment as well as portion control. Check out the short video below to find out what this endo thinks about those who tell us we can’t have sweets. Photo Credit: Dr. Steve Edelman What is Type 2 Diabetes? The Basics Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Emotions & Mental Health: Family, Friends & Relationships Holidays Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

Revisiting Ice Cream And Diabetes

Revisiting Ice Cream And Diabetes

In case you didn't get the memo: Yes, those of us with diabetes CAN eat ice cream. Even though some outside the diabetes community don't think so, and they try to convince us we can't or shouldn't, the fact remains that an ice cream sundae or vanilla waffle cone every once in a while isn't going to kill us. It's not the cause of any type of diabetes, either, and we're not promoting unhealthy eating by enjoying some ice cream on a special occasion. That was the message last summer, when the Diabetes Online Community (DOC) lit up in response to an Indianapolis newspaper columnist's published rant that diabetics can't or shouldn't eat ice cream — and that any organization using ice cream to raise money to send children with diabetes to camp has sold its soul to the devil. Yes, he actually wrote that. And we in the DOC responded. Loudly. Far and wide. (The newspaper has since removed the article - !) And there was ice cream. Now a year later, we're again sending the message that ice cream is OK. But more importantly, the message is that myths, stereotypes and misinformation about diabetes really hurt. They hurt fundraising, the general public's awareness, and the emotions of kids who are made to feel different and that they "can't do this" simply because of their diabetes. The Diabetes Youth Foundation of Indiana (DYFI) is hosting its 23rd annual Ice Cream On the Circle event July 13 in downtown Indianapolis, sponsored for the second year by the American Dairy Association of Indiana. Last year, more than a thousand people floated in and we raised $6,400 to help send children and teens with diabetes to our D-camp, called Camp Until a Cure. And it also helped raise some great awareness for the broader diabetes community, conveniently right in the middle of National Ice Crea Continue reading >>

How Does Ice Cream Affect Your Glucose Reading?

How Does Ice Cream Affect Your Glucose Reading?

How Does Ice Cream Affect Your Glucose Reading? Larger servings will cause larger increases in blood sugar levels.Photo Credit: margouillatphotos/iStock/Getty Images Although some people think you need to give up all sweet treats if you're diabetic, that isn't necessarily the case. Choosing the right foods and properly planning your carbohydrate intake throughout the day can make it possible to indulge on occasion. While ice cream does contain carbohydrates and can increase your blood sugar levels somewhat, it won't necessarily cause blood sugar spikes. The carbohydrate content of ice cream varies. A 1/2-cup serving of chocolate soft serve or the same amount of fat-free, no-sugar-added ice cream in a flavor other than chocolate each has about 19 grams of carbohydrates. A premium vanilla ice cream, on the other hand, can have as much as 24 grams, and other premium flavors, such as those containing chunks of candy or other sweets, can be even higher in carbohydrates. One serving of carbohydrates for a diabetic is 15 grams, and diabetics can usually eat three to five servings per meal or one to two servings per snack and still maintain relatively stable blood sugar levels. This means a 1/2-cup serving of ice cream can take up half of a meal's carbohydrate servings and could contain more than the amount of carbohydrates allowed in a snack. The glycemic index helps predict how much a particular food is likely to raise blood sugar levels after you eat it. Foods low on the glycemic index with scores of 55 or less don't cause blood sugar levels to increase very much, while those with scores over 76 can cause large increases. Regular half-vanilla, half-chocolate ice cream has a GI of about 57, and low-fat raspberry ripple has a GI of 79. However, some low-fat ice creams have a Continue reading >>

Ice Cream For Diabetes: Can You Eat It Or Not?

Ice Cream For Diabetes: Can You Eat It Or Not?

Or, if you care to try your hand at baking, give our dairy products can actually be a very healthy source of protein for people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, so unless you have a specific intolerance to milk products, the dairy in ice cream shouldnt cause any holdups. The real problem is all that sugar! In fact, ice cream contains so much sugar that a 2017 study found that ice cream can actually replace the standard glucose solution used during an oral glucose tolerance test (a test used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes). The standard glucose solution typically contains 75 grams of sugar. All those simple sugars can be detrimental to your blood sugar stability and your overall health. You only have to search through scientific research, or popular health sites to discover that consumption of sugar is responsible for weight gain, obesity, diabetes, inflammation, arthritis, leaky gut, more rapid ageing, and even cancer. The point is: even though we love the taste of sugar, eating it leads to nothing good except an instant gratification! For you though, as a person with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, eliminating sugar and following a lower carb diet, is a sure way to success! 2017 review showed, low carb diets that minimize added sugars can help people with diabetes gain better blood sugar control, especially early on. The researchers found that type 2 diabetics who followed a low carb diet had a 0.34% lower HbA1c when compared to diabetics following a high carb diet during. studies have found A1c reductions range from 1-2.2%. Our members are also achieving significant reductions in A1c levels. Maria G lowered A1c by 1% in 3 months and is now in normal range. Gloria G lowered A1c by 1.3% and is on track to getting back to normal and reducing insulin dosage. S Continue reading >>

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