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Diabetes And Heart Healthy Meals For Two

Diabetes Meals For Good Health | Karen Graham Dietitan And Author

Diabetes Meals For Good Health | Karen Graham Dietitan And Author

The worlds FIRST Breastfeeding Art Expo launched in Kelowna, BC, June 2, 2017. The provactive and amazing Expo is devoted to the wonders, the challenges and the advocacy needed to improve breastfeeding support to women. You can view the Expo online from anywhere in the world. www.breastfeedingartexpo.ca Sign up if you would like to be on my mailing list to receive periodic notification of new resources or additions to our website. The book has over 70 calorie-equivalent meals (large and small size) that you can mix and match to get the calories you need for good health. All meals are shown in life-size photographs. LOSING WEIGHT More than a month of daily meal plans from 1,200 2,200 calories. MANAGING DIABETES To help you manage your blood sugars. KEEPING YOUR HEART HEALTHY Reduce cholesterol and blood pressure. REDUCING YOUR RISK FOR CANCER Shows high fiber and nutrient-rich meals. HEALTHY LIVING Lots of tips for making lifestyle changes in a positive way. Nutrition information for each recipe calories, carbohydrate, protein, fat, cholesterol and sodium. Diabetes exchanges (Food Choices)for each meal, as well as total carbohydrate and fiber. 32-page guide at back of book shows food and beverage portions and helps you interpret food labels. ISBN: 978-0-7788-0402-4 (CAN) | 978-0-7788-0403-1 (USA) Published in cooperation with the Canadian Diabetes Association. 2012 Edition (previously published as Meals for Good Health) Buy a copy (copies) from bookstores across Canada, including independent bookstores or pharmacies, or Chapters and Coles. If you dont have a bookstore in your community you can order directly from an online bookstore such as www.amazon.ca and www.chapters.indigo.ca . If you are a bookstore or pharmacy wishing to stock the book: American customersinterest Continue reading >>

Heart-healthy Meals

Heart-healthy Meals

Featured Cookbook Diabetes & Hearty-Healthy Meals for Two by American Diabetes Association & American Heart Association Brought to you by two of the largest health associations in America – the recipes in this cookbook are simple, flavorful, and perfect for people with diabetes who also need to watch out for their cardiovascular health. Continue reading >>

Tasty Recipes For Diabetics

Tasty Recipes For Diabetics

In simple terms, when someone has diabetes, their blood glucose is too high. Where does glucose come from? It comes from the foods we eat. Unfortunately, the tastiest meals cannot be eaten by diabetics. That is, unless you know about the delicious meals that a diabetic can eat! The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program has created a booklet for tasty meals that can be eaten by diabetics. In general, a person with diabetes should: Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. Choose fresh, frozen, canned, or dried fruit and 100% fruit juices. Eat a variety of vegetables such as greens, spinach, carrots, squash, beans, etc. Eat fewer foods that are high in sugar and salt. Drink alcohol sparingly (if any at all). Here are a few of the tasty recipes from The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program that the entire family can enjoy! Spanish Omelet Prep Time: 1 Minutes Cook time: 1 Minutes Ingredients – 5 small potatoes (peeled and sliced) – Vegetable cooking spray – ½ medium onion (minced) – 1 small zucchini (sliced) – 1½ cups green/red peppers (sliced thin) – 5 medium mushrooms (sliced) – 3 whole eggs (beaten) – 5 egg whites (beaten) – Pepper, garlic salt with herbs to taste – 3 ounces part-skim mozzarella cheese (shredded) – 1 Tbsp. low-fat parmesan cheese– Directions: Preheat oven to 375 °F. Cook potatoes in boiling water until tender. In a nonstick pan, add vegetable spray and warm at medium heat. Add onion and sauté until brown. Add vegetables and sauté until tender but not brown. In a medium mixing bowl, slightly beat eggs and egg whites, pepper, garlic salt, and low-fat mozzarella cheese. Stir egg-cheese mixture into the cooked vegetables. In a 10- Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Heart Healthy Meals For Two

Diabetes & Heart Healthy Meals For Two

American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association Diabetic meals you and your loved one will enjoy together! Lower your blood pressure and risk for heart disease with simple, tasty recipes for two! People with diabetes want heart-healthy recipes, since heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as the rest of the population. But they also want recipes that taste great. In Diabetes & Heart Healthy Meals for Two, the two largest health associations in America team up to provide recipes that are simple, flavorful, and perfect for people with diabetes who are worried about improving or maintaining their cardiovascular health. A follow-up toDiabetes & Heart Healthy Cookbook, this newest collaboration from the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association focuses on meals with only two servings. Because so many adults with diabetes are older, two-serving meals are perfect for those without children in the houseor even those living alone who want to keep leftovers to a minimum. I had wanted to have a cookbook that had recipes for just two people because I do not have a big family. Thankful for the cookbook. 1 person found this review helpful. Was this review helpful for you? i need help in controlling my type 2 diabetes i use insulin, please help- i just started gym but food wise is difficult, i eat something and it sky rises :( 0 people found this review helpful. Was this review helpful for you? Continue reading >>

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

Top 8 Easiest & Best Snacks For A Diabetic

We all get hungry in between meals. So instead of reaching for those chips and nasty saltine crackers, opt for one of these easy tasty snacks instead. They are all low in carbs and perfectly diabetic friendly – of course! 1. Olives Olives make the perfect snack. They are full of healthy monounsaturated fats and contain all the same benefits extra virgin olive oil offers – the ability to lower blood glucose, increase insulin sensitivity, lower cholesterol, reduced risk of heart disease and just improve overall health. When it comes to diabetes, monounsaturated fats are the best types of fats to eat – you'll also find this type of fat in avocados and nuts. Olives are a great source of antioxidants – vitamin E, flavonoids, and polyphenolic compounds that all reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Just grab a handful, chew them slowly and thoroughly, and your hunger pangs will soon be entirely satisfied. Nutrition Facts: 10 olives: Calories (Energy): 50g Fat: 4.70g Carbohydrate: 2.80g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 0g Protein: 0.40g. 2. Cucumber Cucumbers are low in calories – being mostly made up of water, which makes them perfect for quenching thirst and hunger. According to Organic Facts: “The flesh of cucumbers is rich in vitamins A, C, and folic acid while the hard skin of cucumbers is rich in fiber and a range of minerals include magnesium, molybdenum, and potassium.” Tip: Cucumber rounds make the perfect cracker replacement. They are crisp, provide a firm base, and aren't overly powerful on taste. So you can top them with whatever you like for a super healthy diabetic snack. Or, even use them as crackers for dips. The idea is to replace your processed crackers with cucumber crackers instead (see recipe below). Nutrition Facts: Half cup slices: Calories (Energy): 8 Continue reading >>

Cardiac And Diabetic Meal Plans

Cardiac And Diabetic Meal Plans

If you have diabetes, you are twice as likely to have a heart attack or stroke than someone who does not, according to the American Diabetes Association. Eating right not only helps you manage your blood sugar but also helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure. A cardiac and diabetic diet encourages you to eat more fresh, whole foods and less saturated fat and sodium. Consult a doctor before making any dietary changes. Video of the Day A cardiac and diabetic meal plan incorporates the diet basics for both diabetes and heart health. That means continuing to control your carb intake by eating the same amount of carbs at each meal as determined by your dietitian or doctor to manage blood sugar. If you don't know your meal carb needs, the ADA suggests starting at 45 to 60 grams. In addition, to improve heart health, eat more nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, poultry, fish and nuts, while limiting foods high in calories and sodium that offer very little nutrition, such as soda, cake and fast food. Limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams a day, or 1,500 milligrams if you have high blood pressure. What to Eat for Breakfast Make whole grains a priority at breakfast. Whole grains, as well as fruits and vegetables, are a good source of fiber, and getting more fiber in your diet helps with blood sugar control and lowers your risk of heart disease. A heart-healthy diabetic breakfast might include 1/2 cup of cooked oatmeal topped with a small banana and served with a 6-ounce container of sugar-free yogurt. Or try a toasted whole-wheat English muffin topped with 2 teaspoons of peanut butter and an apple. Keeping It Heart-Healthy at Lunch The American Heart Association recommends you eat at least two servings of fish a week. The omega-3 f Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Healthy Meals For Two

Diabetes And Heart Healthy Meals For Two

Twice as tasty . . . but with half the ingredients! People with diabetes want heart-healthy recipes, since heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as the rest of the population. But they also want recipes that taste great. In ... More Twice as tasty . . . but with half the ingredients! People with diabetes want heart-healthy recipes, since heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as the rest of the population. But they also want recipes that taste great. In Diabetes Heart Healthy Meals for Two, the two largest health associations in America team up to provide recipes that are simple, flavorful, and perfect for people with diabetes who are worried about improving or maintaining their cardiovascular health. The follow-up to Diabetes Heart Healthy Cookbook, published in 2006, this newest collaboration from the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association focuses on meals with only two servings. Because so many adults with diabetes are older, two-serving meals are perfect for those without children in the house or even those living alone who want to keep leftovers to a minimum. The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The American Heart Association's mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Less Continue reading >>

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What is a healthy , balanced diet for Diabetes ? From Diabetes UK Whether you are living with diabetes or not, eating well is important. The foods you choose to eat in your daily diet make a difference not only to managing diabetes , but also to how well you feel and how much energy you have every day. How much you need to eat and drink is based on your age, gender, how active you are and the goals you are looking to achieve. Portion sizes have grown in recent years, as the plates and bowls we use have got bigger. Use smaller crockery to cut back on your portion sizes, while making the food on your plate look bigger. No single food contains all the essential nutrients you need in the right proportion. Thats why you need to consume foods from each of the main food groups to eat well. Naturally low in fat and calories and packed full of vitamins, minerals and fibre, fruit and vegetables add flavour and variety to every meal. They may also help protect against stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers. Try: adding an extra handful of vegetables to your dishes when cooking peas to rice, spinach to lamb or onions to chicken. Potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, chapattis, naan and plantain all contain carbohydrate, which is broken down into glucose and used by your cells as fuel. Better options of starchy foods such as wholegrain bread, wholewheat pasta and basmati, brown or wild rice contain more fibre, which helps to keep your digestive system working well. They are generally more slowly absorbed (that is, they have a lower glycaemic index, or GI), keeping you feeling fuller for longer. Try: potatoes any way you like but dont fry them with the skin left on for valuable fibre. Milk, cheese and yogurt contain calcium, which is vital for growing children as it kee Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Heart Healthy Roasted Garlic Chicken Recipe

Heart Healthy Roasted Garlic Chicken Recipe

Heart Healthy Roasted Garlic Chicken Recipe Heart healthy roasted garlic chicken is juicy, and loaded with the flavors of roasted garlic and butter! Its comfort food for a Sunday gathering, or just a simple weeknight dinner. This heart healthy chicken recipe is being shared in celebration of todays holiday, National Garlic Day! If the aroma of 40 cloves of fresh garlic, rosemary, and thyme dont grab your senses, the taste will have you CRUSHING for this delicious dinner! Acouple of important notesabout this heart healthy garlic roasted chicken recipe: First of all, this is mylousy photo disclaimer: Im not impressed at all with my photos inthis post. So please close your eyes and visualize a gorgeous, perfect plate of herb and garlic infused, crispy skinned, chicken. Thank you. I think that looks much better thanthepile of, umm cluck cluck, that you see pictured here. I finished cooking the chickenlate in the afternoon, rushingto get photos taken before thesunwentbelowthe horizon. Of course, I neglectedtheopportunity to do any fancy plating. UGH. Im embarrassed, ashamed, and VERY sorry, but I wanted you to havethis chicken recipe in your life as soon as possible. So here is the heart healthy chicken,in its half-nakedcondition. Secondly, I dont use the term heart healthy lightly. Check out these healthy facts about garlic: Numerous studies and clinical research show that garlic consumption is healthy for humans. One search withGoogle resultsin millions of hits, and far more information than mybrain canconsume in one sitting. Garlic has long been hailed for its healing powers, especially against infectious diseases like cold and flu, but studies also show that consumption of (primarily raw) garlic can: Reduce risk for heart diseases like heart attack and stroke. Help to m Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Heart Healthy Meals For Two : Over 170 Delicious Recipes That Help You (both) Eat Well And

Diabetes & Heart Healthy Meals For Two : Over 170 Delicious Recipes That Help You (both) Eat Well And

Twice as tasty . . . but with half the.ingredients! .People with diabetes want heart-healthy recipes, since.heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as.often as the rest of the population. But they also want.recipes that taste great. In Diabetes And Heart Healthy.Meals for Two, the two largest health associations in.America team up to provide recipes that are simple,.flavorful, and perfect for people with diabetes who are.worried about improving or maintaining their cardiovascular.health..A follow-up to Diabetes And Heart Healthy Cookbook,.published in 2006, this newest collaboration from the.American Diabetes Association and the American.Heart Association focuses on meals with only two.servings. Because so many adults with diabetes are.older, two-serving meals are perfect for those without.children in the house?or even those living alone who.want to keep leftovers to a minimum. Offers easy and healthy recipes for two, along with tips for making heart-healthy meal plans for people dealing with diabetes. Genre: Health + Wellness, Cooking + Food + Wine Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What you eat makes a big difference when you have diabetes. When you build your diet, four key things to focus on are carbs, fiber, fat, and salt. Here's what you should know about each of them. Carbs give you fuel. They affect your blood sugar faster than fats or protein. You’ll mainly get them from: Fruit Milk and yogurt Bread, cereal, rice, pasta Starchy vegetables like potatoes, corn, and beans Some carbs are simple, like sugar. Other carbs are complex, like those found in beans, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains. Complex carbohydrates are better for you because they take longer for your body to digest. They give you steady energy and fiber. You may have heard of “carbohydrate counting.” That means you keep track of the carbs (sugar and starch) you eat each day. Counting grams of carbohydrate, and splitting them evenly between meals, will help you control your blood sugar. If you eat more carbohydrates than your insulin supply can handle, your blood sugar level goes up. If you eat too little, your blood sugar level may fall too low. You can manage these shifts by knowing how to count carbs. One carbohydrate serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrates. A registered dietitian can help you figure out a carbohydrate counting plan that meets your specific needs. For adults, a typical plan includes two to four carb servings at each meal, and one to two as snacks. You can pick almost any food product off the shelf, read the label, and use the information about grams of carbohydrates to fit the food into your meal plan. Anyone can use carb counting. It’s most useful for people who take more than one daily injection of insulin, use the insulin pump, or want more flexibility and variety in their food choices. You get fiber from plant foods -- fruits, vegetables, whole g Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cookbook Review: The Diabetes & Heart Healthy Cookbook, 2nd Edition

Diabetes Cookbook Review: The Diabetes & Heart Healthy Cookbook, 2nd Edition

Diabetes Cookbook Review: the Diabetes & Heart Healthy Cookbook, 2nd Edition Diabetes Cookbook Review: the Diabetes & Heart Healthy Cookbook, 2nd Edition I dont envy those whose job it is to make diabetes-friendly eating into something that sounds exciting or at least worth the time and effort to complete a recipe. The stuffs got to taste good, the ingredients have to be somewhat familiar; the recipes cant be too difficult. You dont want to terrify any newcomers to diabetes, but youd like to avoid exasperating the old-timers. Somehow, the hardworking souls who put together this diabetes cookbook made it all work. The book is a joint effort from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association, so while I was eager to try out some of the recipes, I was also slightly wary of what Id find inside. Would the recipes call for abominations like sugar-free jelly or spray margarine? How much kale would be involved? Did each recipe come with a free lecture from a disappointed endocrinologist and/or cardiologist? Upon the very first reading, though, it became clear that this is really just a cookbook for people who want to eat healthy, with the added bonus of exchange counts and complete nutrition information for each recipe. There are lighter takes on perennial favorites, like Mustard-Crusted Beef Tenderloin and Chicken Pot Pie, and then there are more adventurous recipes containing things like farro, which news to me is an ancient whole grain thats popular in Italy. Theres a pretty beefy (heh) vegetarian section, which is where I found most of the recipes I prepared. While Ive just recently stopped eating meat, Ive never really liked cooking it myself. (Nothing intimidates me like a whole raw chicken.) Other chapters include Appetizers and Snacks, Breads and Continue reading >>

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