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Diabetes And Heart Disease Symptoms

Diabetes, Heart Disease Share Symptoms, Risks

Diabetes, Heart Disease Share Symptoms, Risks

If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes you also have an increased risk for heart disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Often, addressing certain risk factors for one disease can lower the risk of both diseases. Heart disease is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of early death among people with diabetes—about 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease and stroke, according to the CDC. Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about two to four times higher than adults without diabetes. High blood glucose in adults with diabetes increases the risk for heart attack, stroke, angina, and coronary artery disease. Over time blood glucose levels may cause other serious problems including eye, kidney and nerve damage. People with type 2 diabetes also have increased rates of high blood pressure, lipid problems, and obesity, which contribute to high rates of heart disease. Smoking doubles the risk of heart disease in people with diabetes. As you see, diabetes and heart disease are closely linked. Knowing the risk factors and striving to lower them is important with both diseases. Lowering Risk Factors for Diabetes, Heart Disease Some risk factors for diabetes and heart disease are shared. Those include: Family history Carrying extra weight around the waist Abnormal cholesterol levels High blood pressure Smoking Learn more: Learn more about who is at risk for diabetes and heart disease. Learn more about Cardiology at Miami Valley Hospital. Learn more about Cardiology at Good Samaritan Hospital. Learn more about Cardiology at Atrium Medical Center. Learn more about Cardiology at Upper Valley Medical Center. Premier Health’s hospitals provide American Diabetes Association-certified education programs for individua Continue reading >>

What Are The Health Benefits Of Turmeric?

What Are The Health Benefits Of Turmeric?

Turmeric is dubbed as a superfood for its numerous benefits, but these benefits are not just hype or false claims. According to this study, turmeric is a good alternative to conventional drugs. More importantly, the study states that turmeric has a number of notable therapeutic properties and it elicits favorable effects in various body systems. In fact, here are some turmeric evidence-based benefits: · Turmeric helps control inflammation. A large number of health conditions including cancer, diabetes, and heart disease are triggered by inflammation. Based on this study, curcumin, the active compound in turmeric, helps control inflammation at the molecular level and inhibits molecules that go to the core of cells that significantly influence inflammation. · Curcumin helps alleviate symptoms of arthritis. An alleviation of the symptoms of arthritis, especially joint swelling, walking stiffness, and joint pain, with the intake of curcumin is attributed to its anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, curcumin also has pain-reducing effects. · Turmeric is effective against stomach problems. From a simple indigestion to occasional stomach pain to irritable bowel syndrome to inflammatory bowel disease, turmeric’s anti-inflammatory compounds and antioxidants combined with its numerous vitamins and minerals relieve stomach problems as seen in this review of human studies. · It is a good painkiller. As an alternative to prescription painkillers, turmeric’s anti-nociceptive effect is a valuable property for treating different kinds of pains. Turmeric interacts with the endogenous opioid system, the body’s natural pain reliever, thereby eliciting relief from pain. In a published study in the European Journal of Pharmacology, the opioid system in diabetic rats were natu Continue reading >>

The Silent Heart Attacks That Can Strike Diabetics Without Warning

The Silent Heart Attacks That Can Strike Diabetics Without Warning

Property consultant Michael Green was adamant that his type 2 diabetes was nothing to worry about. 'It's the non-serious type,' he'd say dismissively. Michael's laid-back attitude is in some ways understandable. The father-of-one had never suffered any obvious ill-effects from the condition he'd lived with for 28 years, and he'd been diagnosed not as a result of any troubling symptoms, but by chance following a routine blood test. Compared to a family friend who had type 1 diabetes, he was lucky, he insisted. At least he didn't have to monitor his blood sugar levels every few hours, and inject insulin. Then one night, two years ago, he went to sleep and never woke up. At just 53, he'd suffered a 'silent heart attack' - a little-known complication of diabetes. A silent attack is almost symptomless and occurs without any of the chest pain normally associated with a heart attack. Yet they can be just as dangerous - if not more so - as a normal heart attack. They're also surprisingly common. It is estimated that around a quarter of the 175,000 heart attacks in the UK each year are the silent type - and people with diabetes are at greatest risk. This is because the nerve damage linked to their condition can prevent warning signals being transmitted in the usual way. This, in turn, can lead to a delay in seeking treatment and result in damage to the blood vessels and heart muscle that make the heart attack more lethal. Heart attacks occur when there is a blockage in the artery supplying blood to the heart. Normally, this is as a result of a fatty plaque breaking off from the artery wall, triggering a blood clot. When the blood supply to the heart is reduced, the body produces chemicals that affect nerves and trigger pain. Often, people describe the pain of a heart attack as a Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. Data from the National Heart Association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The Framingham Study was one of the first pieces of evidence to show that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to heart disease than those people who did not have diabetes. The Framingham Study looked at generations of people, including those with diabetes, to try to determine the health risk factors for developing heart disease. It showed that multiple health factors -- including diabetes -- could increase the possibility of developing heart disease. Aside from diabetes, other health problems associated with heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of early heart disease. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is 2 to 4 times higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. For example, one medical study found that people with d Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease Share Symptoms, Risks

Diabetes, Heart Disease Share Symptoms, Risks

If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes you also have an increased risk for heart disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Often, addressing certain risk factors for one disease can lower the risk of both diseases. Heart disease is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of early death among people with diabetes—about 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease and stroke, according to the CDC. Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about two to four times higher than adults without diabetes. High blood glucose in adults with diabetes increases the risk for heart attack, stroke, angina, and coronary artery disease. Over time blood glucose levels may cause other serious problems including eye, kidney and nerve damage. People with type 2 diabetes also have increased rates of high blood pressure, lipid problems, and obesity, which contribute to high rates of heart disease. Smoking doubles the risk of heart disease in people with diabetes. As you see, diabetes and heart disease are closely linked. Knowing the risk factors and striving to lower them is important with both diseases. Lowering Risk Factors for Diabetes, Heart Disease Some risk factors for diabetes and heart disease are shared. Those include: Family history Carrying extra weight around the waist Abnormal cholesterol levels High blood pressure Smoking Learn more: Learn more about who is at risk for diabetes and heart disease. Learn more about Cardiology at Miami Valley Hospital. Learn more about Cardiology at Good Samaritan Hospital. Learn more about Cardiology at Atrium Medical Center. Learn more about Cardiology at Upper Valley Medical Center. Premier Health’s hospitals provide American Diabetes Association-certified education programs for individua Continue reading >>

11 Tests For Heart Disease You Never Knew You Needed

11 Tests For Heart Disease You Never Knew You Needed

Advanced cholesterol panel iStock/Gab13 Picture a highway with 100 passengers. If they are driving 10 to a minivan, there are only 10 large vehicles on the road and it is not too congested. If all 100 are riding in individual small cars, there’s a lot more traffic. That is how large and small LDL cholesterol appears in arteries. Lots of LDL particles clog up the artery highway. Those LDL riders in cars can also be hard and dense, like a golf ball, or large and soft, like a sponge. The small, dense LDL particles do a lot more damage to arteries. (Here are some foods that lower cholesterol naturally.) This is why two people with an LDL level of 100 mg/dl can have different heart disease risks, because it’s possible that they have widely different particle numbers and sizes. If someone has fewer than 1,000 LDL particles in a blood sample and they are large in size, their risk for hardening of arteries is low. A second person might have a particle number of 2,000 be loaded with small “golf balls” that are knocking into and entering arteries to cause plaques. (Don't miss these silent signs of clogged arteries.) An advanced cholesterol panel blood test can tell you more about your LDL particle number and size. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein iStock/kicsiicsi This is a marker for inflammation, which slowly erodes blood vessels and other organs. (Here are some foods that fight inflammation.)In the past decade, a blood test for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein has changed the assessment of patients dramatically. If your hs-CRP is normal (usually less than 0.1 mg/dl), your arteries do not appear inflamed by your diet, lifestyle, or other risk factors. On the other hand, if your hs-CRP is elevated, something is wrong with your lifestyle or health, and we should iden Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetes And Heart Disease May Spike Before Menopause

Risk Of Diabetes And Heart Disease May Spike Before Menopause

(Reuters Health) - Women may be at greater risk for developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke in the years before menopause, rather than afterward, a U.S. study suggests. “This may mean that the higher cardiovascular risk seen among post-menopausal women could be related to changes in that time before menopause and less so to the changes after menopause has occurred,” said lead study author Dr. Mark DeBoer, a researcher at University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville. While the reasons for this are unclear, the findings suggest that women may need to pay especially close attention to cardiovascular risk factors in the years leading up to menopause and consider lifestyle changes like improved diet and exercise habits that can make problems like diabetes and heart disease less likely, DeBoer added by email. Menopause typically happens between ages 45 and 55. As the ovaries curb production of estrogen and progesterone, menstruation stops, and women can experience symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness. Certain treatments for menopause symptoms that contain man-made versions of the hormones estrogen and progestin have also been linked to an increase risk of heart attack and stroke. Previous research has also linked menopause to an increased risk of what’s known as metabolic syndrome, a constellation of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke. Obesity, inactivity and a history of smoking appear to make these problems more likely. For the current study, researchers examined data on 1,470 white and African-American women participating in a national study of the causes and health effects of hardening of the arteries. All of the women went through menopause during the ten-year study period. Researc Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Heart Attack?

What Are The Causes Of Heart Attack?

Answer Wiki It is not surprising that the most common causes of heart attack comprises of lifestyle issues, eating habits, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, weight and stress issues, and diabetes. Coronary Artery Disease: The underlying cause of most heart attacks. This is a result of a build-up (collectively called as plaques) of cholesterol and other substances in the artery. One of these plaques can rupture and spill out cholesterol and other substances (plaque) into the bloodstream causing blood clots that block the coronary artery. Studies show that one fifth of the deaths in India are caused due to coronary heart disease A spasm in the coronary artery: This shuts down the blood flow to the heart muscle causing a heart attack. Drugs like cocaine can cause such a life-threatening spasm. A tear in heart artery: A heart attack can also occur due to a tear in the heart artery (spontaneous coronary artery dissection). Coronary Embolism—a condition, in which small blood clots or tumors travel from other parts of the body to the artery—is an uncommon cause of heart attacks. Decreased Blood Flow to the Heart: When blood flow to the heart is severely decreased, in the case of extremely low blood pressure (shock), it can lead to a heart attack. Family history: Your chances of having a heart attack are higher if you have a family history of heart disease or a history of cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and obesity. If you still didn’t got the answer check out Dr. Agarwal who is talking about causes of heart attack in the following video, Heart attack warning signs can vary from person to person, and they may not always be sudden or severe. Always bear in mind, act immediately. Some people wait too long because they don’t recognise t Continue reading >>

Heart Disease

Heart Disease

Print Overview Heart disease describes a range of conditions that affect your heart. Diseases under the heart disease umbrella include blood vessel diseases, such as coronary artery disease; heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias); and heart defects you're born with (congenital heart defects), among others. The term "heart disease" is often used interchangeably with the term "cardiovascular disease." Cardiovascular disease generally refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke. Other heart conditions, such as those that affect your heart's muscle, valves or rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease. Many forms of heart disease can be prevented or treated with healthy lifestyle choices. Symptoms Heart disease symptoms depend on what type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease symptoms may be different for men and women. For instance, men are more likely to have chest pain; women are more likely to have other symptoms along with chest discomfort, such as shortness of breath, nausea and extreme fatigue. Symptoms can include: Chest pain, chest tightness, chest pressure and chest discomfort (angina) Shortness of breath Pain, numbness, weakness or coldness in your legs or arms if the blood vessels in those parts of your body are narrowed Pain in the neck, jaw, throat, upper abdomen or back You might not be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease until you have a heart attack, angina, stroke or heart failure. It's important to watch for cardiovascular symptoms and discuss concerns with your doctor. Cardiovascular disease can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused b Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Related To Cholesterol?

How Is Diabetes Related To Cholesterol?

The Diabetes Forum - find support, ask questions and share your experiences with 250,009 people. Join the Forum A Cholesterol is a type of blood fat (blood lipid) that forms the membrane of each cell of the body. Cholesterol is carried in the blood by proteins called lipoproteins and it is these that are measured when you have a cholesterol test. Ratio of total cholesterol-to-HDL is taken by dividing the total cholesterol figure by the HDL figure. This provides a more reliable indicator of heart health than looking at the total cholesterol or LDL figures. High cholesterol does not usually present any symptoms in itself, however, people that have high or unbalanced cholesterol levels over a number of years are more likely to develop problems conditions such as heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). If you have healthy fats and follow a low-carb diet, youare likely to have as good or better cholesterol levels and heart health than by following a low-fat diet. As we noted above, higher total cholesterol does not necessarily indicate unhealthy cholesterol levels. So, when reviewing your cholesterol levels, look at the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL. Statins are effective in reducing levels of cholesterol and have been found to reduce risk of heart disease. As with any medication, be aware of the side effects that can exist. A cholesterol test, which measures total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, should be performed at least once every year for people with diabetes. If you smoke, it is highly beneficial to quit smoking to lower your risk of heart attack or stroke. Statins will often be offered to adults with diabetes and high cholesterol. Following a healthy diet, that is not over-reliant on processed food, Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Scientists have discovered the conditions are linked by the same genes which could offer hope of combating them with the same drug. Researchers analysed the complete DNA of more than 250,000 people and found seven mutations that increased the risk for heart disease and diabetes. It could help explain why diabetics are 65 and 48 per cent more likely to suffer heart failure or a heart attack, respectively. "Identifying these gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease risk in principle opens up opportunities to lower the risk of both outcomes with a single drug,” said Professor Danish Saleheen, Epidemiologist at Pennsylvania University. The findings add to the basic scientific understanding of both major illnesses and point to potential targets for future drugs. Professor Saleheen said: "From a drug development perspective it would make sense to focus on those pathways that are most strongly linked to both diseases." Type 2 diabetes is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) but the reasons why are still fairly unclear. Coronary heart disease affects more than 2.3 million people in Britain and 69,000 die from heart attacks every year as a result. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. There are an estimated 3.6 million Britons living with type 2 diabetes - a major cause of premature death. Professor Saleheen’s team analysed DNA data from participants of South Asian, East Asian or European descent, uncovered 16 new genetic variants associated with diabetes and one with heart disease. They then showed most known to increase the risk of one also increased the ri Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Avoid Heart Attacks And Strokes If You Have Diabetes

8 Ways To Avoid Heart Attacks And Strokes If You Have Diabetes

Protect your heart Although many people with type 2 diabetes worry about losing their vision or having an amputation, the greater risk is to the heart and brain. About 65% of people with type 2 diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. They are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease than people without diabetes. "When someone does get a diagnosis of diabetes, they probably have had prediabetes for as long as 10 years," says Gerald Bernstein, MD. "By the time their diagnosis is made, their risk for cardiovascular disease is extremely high. And then 10 years later, they will have their first cardiovascular event." An enormous challenge "People with type 2 diabetes are faced with an enormous challenge. Because they not only have the problem of glucose metabolism that has gone astray, but in most patients, they have an associated problem related to their cholesterol and to their blood pressure, and obviously their weight," says Dr. Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. "All of these things have to be attacked with the same vigor." To help prevent heart attacks and stroke, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommends the following steps. Control your blood sugar If you've been prescribed medication, take it. To make sure your blood sugar is in the safe zone, get a hemoglobin A1C test at least twice a year. This test measures the amount of glucose stuck to red blood cells, which is a sign of blood sugar control in the previous three months. (Aim for below 7%). For a better sense of your daily blood sugar or how food affects it, you can prick your finger and use a blood glucose monitor to get a reading. (It should be 90 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Heart Disease

Diabetic Heart Disease

is heart disease that develops in people with diabetes. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can cause a heart attack, which is sometimes "silent," or a stroke. People who have diabetes are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease because, over time, high blood sugar can damage blood vessels and nerves that control the heart. Heart attack A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart is blocked Symptoms of a heart attack include: Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching feeling in your chest or arms Nausea, indigestion, heartburn, or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Silent heart attack A silent heart attack is one that has few or no symptoms Stroke A stroke occurs when part of your brain goes without blood for too long Symptoms of a stroke include: Sudden weakness or droopiness of the face, or issues with your vision Sudden weakness or numbness in one or both arms Difficulty speaking, slurred speech, or garbled speech If you experience symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, be sure to seek immediate medical attention. Continue reading >>

How Do Symptoms Of A Heart Attack Differ In People With Diabetes?

How Do Symptoms Of A Heart Attack Differ In People With Diabetes?

Question: How do symptoms of a heart attack differ in people with diabetes? Answer: Well, if you have diabetes -- particularly for a long time -- it can alter how the body responds to sort of, the heart, the pain the heart is feeling. I've studied this for many years, and we actually describe that individuals with diabetes, like yourself, may not have typical chest pain or angina pectoris when they have a heart attack. Some of these patients actually may have chest pressure, milder pressure; they may not have any pain at all in the chest, instead they may notice the acute onset of shortness of breath, or sweating, or sometimes you may even experience some weird change in your glucose level that you can't explain. And in those cases that could be what's called an equivalent -- an anginal equivalent -- for heart attack. This is a problem in patients like yourself with diabetes, because if you don't recognize you're having a heart attack because of the unusual nature of these symptoms, you may not go to the emergency room as fast as you should. And we know that when you have a heart attack, how quickly delivered those treatments for heart attack are given to you, the better the outcome you will have. So be mindful of the fact that if you have any symptoms that are unusual in the chest or affect your breathing, this could represent sort of the equivalent of heart pain, even though it's not the classic crushing chest pain you may have heard about. Next: Do Women Experience Angina And Heart Attacks Differently Than Men? Previous: How Do I Know When Shortness Of Breath Is Due To Other Conditions Such As Emphysema, Or Heart Disease? Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

Weird, whispering symptoms are easy to overlook; how to prevent and recognize this risk for people with diabetes. In a new study of more than 9,000 people, silent heart attacks—with warning signs so quiet or so unusual that people didn’t seek medical help—were nearly as common as classic heart attacks with well-known symptoms like crushing chest pain. And they were almost as lethal in the long run, tripling the odds of dying during the 9-year study compared to people who didn’t have a heart attack of any kind. It’s a wake-up call for anyone at risk for heart disease, but heart experts say people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should pay particular attention. “People with diabetes are at higher risk for silent heart attacks for several reasons,” says Om P. Ganda, M.D., medical director of the Lipid Clinic at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and an associate clinical professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “High blood sugar can lead to autonomic nerve damage that reduces the ability to feel pain, including heart-attack pain. Your only symptom might be shortness of breath. And people with diabetes are already at two to three time’s higher risk for heart disease than people without diabetes, which also increases the chances for a silent heart attack.” In a 2013 British study of 5,102 people with type 2, heart tests showed that 16%— about one in six—had likely had silent heart attacks. People with type 1 diabetes may also be at higher-than-average risk, Dr. Ganda says, due to nerve damage and overall heart-disease risk. Lead researcher Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, says silent heart attacks are dangerou Continue reading >>

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