diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Hair Loss Reversible

Type 2 Diabetes Hair Loss - Possible Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Hair Loss - Possible Causes

With type 2 diabetes, hair loss can be a distressing side effect. Some hair loss in everyone is normal - "old" hair falls out and new growth comes in to takes its place. But sometimes thinning or even bald patches become noticeable. Here are some possible causes of hair loss people with diabetes. Medication and Hair Loss Oral medications used to manage diabetes may cause some thinning or loss of hair as a side effect. Each of us responds to medication differently. Some people will not experience any side effects at all. However, if you notice that a greater-than-normal thinning or loss of hair after starting your diabetes medication, talk to your doctor about it. The diabetes medication may not necessarily be the cause (hair loss could be a symptom of another condition, or another medication could be contributing), but if it is, your doctor may be able to put you on a different brand or may have other suggestions for you. Stress Both physical and mental stress can be caused by diabetes. Chronically elevated blood sugar can result in longer healing times and poor circulation, both of which can affect the rate of re-growth of hair. This can end up being very difficult for people with diabetes. The stress on their body from the diabetes leads to unusual or noticeable hair loss; which leads to additional stress from worrying about thinning hair. Assuming the doctor has ruled out other causes for the hair loss, the best thing a diabetic can do is to carefully manage their blood glucose levels. That means following a healthy and appropriate diet, getting regular exercise, and (if prescribed) taking your medication. If needed, try to lose weight -- even a 10 to 15 lb weight loss is beneficial -- or at least maintain your current weight. Once the stress is lessened, hair will o Continue reading >>

Insulin And Hair Loss: How Diet Causes Androgenetic Alopecia

Insulin And Hair Loss: How Diet Causes Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complicated condition. Despite plaguing men – and women – for thousands of years, it is still not fully understood. The conventional wisdom says that it’s entirely caused by genetics. But new evidence suggests diet may play a role too, with hair loss linked to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. In this post, we’ll look at how to reverse these conditions and regrow your hair by changing what you eat. Hair loss, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome Interactions between hormones in the body are complicated. A change in the level of one hormone will often lead to changes in levels of other hormones too. But male pattern baldness may tell us something about these complicated interactions in the body. Multiple studies (e.g. this one, this one, and this one) have found that men who start losing their hair at a young age are more likely to develop insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The current medical understanding of androgenetic alopecia says that the male hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binds to hair follicles, causing them to shrink. Over time, the follicle gets smaller and smaller, until it eventually stops producing hair. These three things – DHT, insulin, and metabolic syndrome – are all linked to diet. Certain foods cause insulin levels to rise, which can in turn lead to more available DHT. These same foods also increase the likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome, as we’ll see. Metabolic syndrome Studies (see above) have shown that men who start losing their hair at a young age are more likely to develop metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is the general name given to a cluster of – usually associated – medical conditions. These include: Obesity Hypertension (high blo Continue reading >>

How Do You Reverse Or Cure Hair Loss Naturally?

How Do You Reverse Or Cure Hair Loss Naturally?

Not all issues of Hair Loss are permanent and irreversible, some are actually as a result of various factors where we can do something about and are thereby reversible. Factors such as Lifestyle, Diet, and Nutrition are known to contribute to the case of Alopecia. Yet these can be controlled and reversed Naturally although the change must really have to start from you. If natural means though are not enough, do not lose hope as technology and medicine is also coming up with better discoveries to cure baldness. However, while conditions that cause baldness such Androgenic Alopecia (Male Pattern Baldness / Female Pattern Baldness) is not something that can be reversed (although there are claims that says otherwise), it is certain to be a condition that can be prevented from worsening with proper health practice. The following are Eight Natural Ways you can apply to yourself as a means of Hair Loss Cure should you encounter sudden issues of Hair Loss even though when you think your likelihood of getting bald (based on family history, et cetera) is low: 1. Maintain Good Nutrition Nutrition is an important aspect of living life to its optimum wellness. Our body is always on the process of wear and tear as we go through our activities in the day and is a process necessary for growth. However, getting the optimum nutrition required for our health requires a balanced sense of diet which some, if not most, of us are unable to accomplish in a day. Ultimately, we end up undernourished which significantly affects ourselves overall, including the health of our scalp. Nutrients that are known commonly to be the cause of Hair Loss among individuals involved Iron, Protein, and B Vitamins. Other nutrients such as Vitamin C, Copper, Zine, and Sulfur are also said to be essential in maint Continue reading >>

Thinning Hair And Hair Loss: The Top 5 Reasons-medically Speaking

Thinning Hair And Hair Loss: The Top 5 Reasons-medically Speaking

Thinning hair is one of the biggest causes of embarrassment that women have as they start to age. But wait, before you allow this minor annoyance (yes minor-it’s not life threatening) to make you feel embarrassed, let’s take a look at what could be the root cause of thinning hair or hair loss, and how you can possibly correct it. The Top 5 Reasons for Thinning Hair or Hair Loss (1). Thinning Hair/Hair Loss Due to Menopause: If you’ve been looking in the mirror lately, and find that you are afraid to look at the huge amount of hair that’s not on your head, your hair loss is probably due to menopause. How Does Menopause Cause Hair Thinning/Loss? Because of declining estrogen levels, hair loss is accelerated and more common in women during menopause or peri-menopause. When your estrogen levels fall, an imbalance between estrogen and testerone occurs, which can cause hair thinning in the androgen sensitive areas of your head. This is also known as male or female pattern baldness. Androgens are important in both men and women because they regulate hair growth; as well as your sex drive-this is probably why menopause is often referred to as “men-on-pause, because everything seems to come to a screeching halt. So if menopause is the cause of your hair loss-what can you do about it? The Fix: See Hair Loss Caused by Dietary Issues (2). Hair Loss Due to Autoimmune Disorders: Perhaps your hair loss could be the result of an autoimmune disorder. Generally, many of you report that your stylists pointed out the changes in your hair texture and hair loss and advised you to consult with a doctor. You consulted with your doctor only to discover that you had one of the following autoimmune disorders. a. If You Were Diagnosed with Thyroid Disease: Hair loss can be due to both, a Continue reading >>

Revealed: 7 Surprising Causes Of Hair Loss And Their Surefire Cures

Revealed: 7 Surprising Causes Of Hair Loss And Their Surefire Cures

#Selfie-Improvement Cosmetic Procedures Here's a snapshot of the procedures that men and women are turning to for #selfie improvement (and a bonus cheat sheet on apps that do the same thing)… As you probably know, your genes are the No. 1 reason that you will either grow old with a full head of hair or start losing it before you hit middle age. What you may not know is that genetics is merely one of many things that can contribute to hair loss. In fact, there are seven surprising causes of hair loss, many of which are 100 percent treatable. Believe it or not, the economy can actually play a role in hair loss. During difficult economic times, stress and worry can take a significant toll on us. And while we may not literally be pulling out our hair (that's called trichotillomania, and is a separate issue altogether), stress-induced hair loss (telogen effluvium) is a reality for many. Treatment: The loss of hair will subside if and when the stress dissipates. This takes time, but yoga, massage and deep breathing exercises can help you cope with stress and its effects. Namaste. No. 2: Your Little Bundle of Joy Many women notice that their hair starts to thin or fall out after pregnancy. The culprit? The hormonal fluctuations that make you cry arbitrarily can also trigger hair loss. And it's not just the pesky hormonal changes associated with pregnancy. Menopause or an underactive thyroid also can cause hair loss. Hair growth depends on the proper functioning of the thyroid gland, and if yours is producing abnormal levels of the thyroid hormone, you may start to lose your hair. Treatment: Don't panic. If hormones are causing your hair loss, it's reversible. As your hormone levels return to normal, your hair will return. If your thyroid is out of whack, treatment will help Continue reading >>

Hair Loss Overview

Hair Loss Overview

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Reverse Your Hair Loss With These Simple Steps

Reverse Your Hair Loss With These Simple Steps

Is your hair receding around the temples? Do the parts in your hairline reveal more scalp than they used to? According to The Doctor Oz Show, hair loss can be a symptom of disease that you can reverse with some simple steps that will regrow your hair and boost your health at the same time. Advertisement In a recent online episode of The Dr. Oz Show, Truth Tube participant “Shawn” goes to Dr. Oz for help as she realizes that despite her best efforts to control her hair loss, that she is going bald at an early age. In fact, so bad was her hair loss that she had to resort to wearing a hat whenever she went out. According to Ox expert Dr. Elizabeth Boham, MD, MS, RD, this is a typical complaint that women come to her with every day. The good news, however, is that hair loss is often due to medical imbalances and nutritional deficiencies that can be stopped and reversed through changes in lifestyle and diet. The following is a summary of what Dr. Boham says could be the cause of your hair loss and what you can do about it. Hair Loss Solution Step #1: Get your thyroid checked Some hair loss is a normal part of your hair follicle cell growth cycle. (Here is a simple test you can do at home to see if you are losing too much hair.) But when hair loss is not normal―such as with an underactive thyroid―according to Dr. Boham, that hair loss is typically caused by and usually one of the first signs of an underactive thyroid. Because the thyroid plays a pivotal role in your metabolism and cell growth, when it slows down, your hair loss speeds up. Fortunately, many cases of a depressed thyroid can be remedied nutritionally by eating these types of thyroid health foods. But if it takes more than a change in diet to get your thyroid hormone levels up where it should be, you will Continue reading >>

21 Reasons Why You're Losing Your Hair

21 Reasons Why You're Losing Your Hair

Why is my hair falling out? It's true that men are more likely to lose their hair than women, mostly due to male pattern baldness (more on that later). But thinning hair and hair loss are also common in women, and no less demoralizing. Reasons can range from the simple and temporary—a vitamin deficiency—to the more complex, like an underlying health condition. In many cases, there are ways to treat both male and female hair loss. It all depends on the cause. Here are some common and not-so-common reasons why you might be seeing less hair on your head. Watch the video: 8 Reasons Your Hair Might Be Falling Out Physical stress Any kind of physical traumasurgery, a car accident, or a severe illness, even the flucan cause temporary hair loss. This can trigger a type of hair loss called telogen effluvium. Hair has a programmed life cycle: a growth phase, rest phase and shedding phase. “When you have a really stressful event, it can shock the hair cycle, (pushing) more hair into the shedding phase,” explains Marc Glashofer, MD, a dermatologist in New York City. Hair loss often becomes noticeable three-to-six months after the trauma. What to do: The good news is that hair will start growing back as your body recovers. Pregnancy Pregnancy is one example of the type of physical stress that can cause hair loss (that and hormones). Pregnancy-related hair loss is seen more commonly after your baby has been delivered rather than actually during pregnancy. “Giving birth is pretty traumatic,” says Dr. Glashofer. What to do: If you do experience hair loss, rest assured that your hair will grow back in a couple of months. “It’s a normal thing and it will work its way out,” Dr. Glashofer says. Too much vitamin A Overdoing vitamin A-containing supplements or medications c Continue reading >>

Causes Of Hair Loss

Causes Of Hair Loss

There are many causes of hair loss - from a stressful lifestyle to underlying medical conditions or simple genetics. Here we discuss the most common causes. The average person sheds between 50 and 100 hairs per day. This is no real cause for concern, as long as your body is replenishing these losses. When hair loss begins to exceed these thresholds, then it is time to worry and you could be suffering from alopecia (the medical term for hair loss). The most favoured explanation is that alopecia areata is an auto-immune disorder, in which antibodies to the person’s own hair follicles are produced. Alopecia is also found with other auto-immune disorders, such as vitiligo and thyroiditis. Causes of hair loss There are five fairly common causes of diffuse hair loss. These are: Telogen effluvium, nutritional disorders, drugs, hormone abnormalities and male pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). In children, hair loss through a scalp infection, such as ringworm, is increasingly common. Telogen effluvium is temporary hair loss of up to a third of a person's hair due an insult to the body. It usually manifests two to four months after the incident. Common causes are crash diets, exam stress, big operations, pregnancy and divorce/loss of a loved one. It starts normalising after three to six months and after a year it's almost always back to normal. It is more common in females and needs no treatment. Nutritional causes of hair loss The most common nutritional problems associated with alopecia are iron and zinc deficiency. In practice, these are probably the only ones causing alopecia. Hair loss is also observed in people who consistently take in too much selenium. The average daily intake recommendations for selenium are 60 micrograms per day for men and 53 micrograms per da Continue reading >>

The Relation Between Hair Loss And Diabetes

The Relation Between Hair Loss And Diabetes

Diabetes is a curse of the modern society rich with stress, worries, sedentary lifestyle and fast food. Often this disease can be connected with hair thinning fragile hair, unhealthy locks and severe balding. People who suffer from it are more prone than the rest of the general population to damage of the nerves, heart, other body organs and blood vessels. Yes, blood vessels, in fact, you should know that diabetes negatively affects our body’s circulatory system. In this way the less amount of nutrients and oxygen reach the upper and the lower extremities of the body, like the feet and the scalp areas. Diabetes can trigger hair loss, decreasing the micro blood circulation If diabetes is causing poor blood circulation to the scalp, the hair follicles will progressively shrink resulting in baldness. Poor circulation may prevent further and normal hair growth. So diabetes not only causes the loss of your existing locks, but it also prevents the growth of new hair. It also can bring about hormonal imbalance in the human body, and such hormonal changes may be manifested through hair thinning. In fact, this also explains the reason behind hair loss after delivery and menopause Drugs which are used to treat diabetes may also lead to baldness and if you feel this is your case, consult your doc to get your prescription modified. This bad disease may weaken your immune system, making it susceptible to other illnesses such as skin rashes and thyroid dysfunctions. Diabetes may also cause high levels of oxidative stress, hence causing “old hair”. How has diabetes influenced your hair in terms of growth or loss? Have you noticed any changes in the condition of your hair since you have been diagnosed as being suffering from diabetes? Changes such as progressive loss of hair, eve Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

A A A Do I need to follow-up with my doctor after being diagnosed with diabetic eye disease? Diabetes is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide, and, in the United States, it is the most common cause of blindness in people younger than 65 years of age. Diabetic eye disease also encompasses a wide range of other eye problems, for example, Diabetes may cause a reversible, temporary blurring of the vision, or it can cause a severe, permanent loss of vision. Some people may not even realize they have had diabetes for several years until they begin to experience problems with their eyes or vision. Diabetes also may result in heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and circulatory abnormalities of the legs. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million people additional people went undiagnosed. (This population is unaware that they have diabetes.) In the United States 1.2 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year. In the US in 2012, the total annual cost of diagnosed diabetes was 2.45 billion. Eighty-six million people in the US have prediabetes, and 9 out of every 10 don't know they have it. Of the 86 million people with prediabetes, without lifestyle changes 15% to 30% of them will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Lifestyle management has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by at least two-thirds. It can also slow or halt the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. People can try to avoid the problems associated with diabetes, including those that affect the eyes, by taking appropriate care of themselves by the following: Maintain a normal level of weight Watch your diet, especially limiting unhealthy types of fats and Continue reading >>

Alopecia Areata: Symptoms, Treatment, And Tips

Alopecia Areata: Symptoms, Treatment, And Tips

Alopecia areata is a type of hair loss that affects patches of the scalp, and sometimes other parts of the body. It is an autoimmune condition. Worldwide, around 2 percent of people will experience it at some time in their life. In the United States (U.S.), up to 6.8 million people are thought to have it. It appears to affect men and women equally. In 8 out of 10 people, the hair grows back spontaneously within a year. What is alopecia areata? Small, soft, hairless patches appear, usually round or oval in shape. The scalp and beard are most commonly affected, but it can occur in any part of the body that normally has hair. There may be tingling, or slight pain in affected areas. Hair may grow back in some parts of the body, temporarily or permanently. When the hair falls out on the scalp, it tends to do so over a short period, and more so on one side than the other. People with this type of alopecia have hairs that become narrower along the length of the strand closer to the base. What causes it? Alopecia areata is not contagious. It is an autoimmune condition, in which the immune system attacks the hair follicles, mistaking them for pathogens such as bacteria. Most people with the condition are otherwise healthy and have no skin problems. It can happen at any age, but it is more likely to start during the late teenage years, early childhood, or early adulthood. A genetic link means it can run in families. Around 20 percent of people with the condition have a family member who also has it. It is more likely if a close relative develops patches before the age of 30 years. If a parent has it, there is a 50 percent that their offspring will too. Among people with alopecia areata, there is a higher occurrence of thyroid disease, atopic eczema, nasal allergies, and asthma. S Continue reading >>

Receding Hairline, Diet And Insulin: The Surprising Hair Loss Link

Receding Hairline, Diet And Insulin: The Surprising Hair Loss Link

Is “natural hair loss” really so natural as we age? Maybe not always. Genetics play a strong role in receding hairlines and male pattern baldness (MPB). However, like with many things, genes aren’t the whole story. In fact, emerging science suggests that diet plays a significant role and that insulin is a primary driver behind hair loss. Additionally, there is even a link between early balding and cardiovascular disease. This article takes a look at what connects these things, the causes of hair loss, and how we can potentially reverse them – naturally. What Is a Receding Hairline and Male Pattern Baldness? The medical name ‘androgenic alopecia’ refers to the permanent loss of hair from the scalp. A receding hairline is the progressive loss of hair men experience. This loss of hair initially occurs around the temple area, on both sides of the forehead. The hair around this area begins to thin, and then gradually recedes. A bald spot may then develop on the top of the head, which eventually leads to a ‘horseshoe’ shaped head of hair. In women, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) tends to progressively develop on the top of the head and the crown. People have long hypothesized that genetics are behind hair loss, but as with many medical conditions, research hints that our lifestyle interacts with these genes. The Role of DHT The hormone DHT (dihydrotestosterone) plays a causative role in thinning hair, and it is a derivative of the male hormone testosterone (1, 2). But a point often overlooked is the underlying factors which cause excess amounts of this hormone; we will look into this later in the article. Age-related hair loss is much more common in men due to their naturally higher testosterone levels. Key Point: Progressive hair loss—otherwise known as an Continue reading >>

After Years Of Being Undiagnosed, Is Diabetic Hair Loss Reversible? I Have Pcos. Diabetes And Pcos Run In My Family.

After Years Of Being Undiagnosed, Is Diabetic Hair Loss Reversible? I Have Pcos. Diabetes And Pcos Run In My Family.

I have had diffuse hair loss for 2.5 yrs. I have PCOS and take Desogen (bcp). I just saw another hair loss doctor, and he thinks I'm either prediabetic or diabetic. Is diabetic hair loss reversible? He said I have diffuse hair thinning. He examined a follicle under the microscope and found it to be miniature. He said there are areas of normal hair and areas of thin hair. Also, I've read that Metformin can cause hair loss. Would a better alternative be insulin injections? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hair Loss

Diabetes Hair Loss

There is a definite connection between diabetes and hair loss. Some women are not even aware that they have the condition and a loss of hair can be one of the first signs. On this page I'll take a look at the symptoms of diabetes, why it causes hair loss, and what to do if it's affecting you. NOTE: This information is provided for guidance purposes only and should not be seen as medical advice. You should always discuss ANY concerns about your health with a qualified medical professional. Could Your Hair Loss Be a Sign of Diabetes? According to recent statistics, 24% of diabetes cases go undiagnosed. Data from the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2014 shows that there are 29.1 million Americans with diabetes - but only 21 million people are aware of it. There are lots of different reasons that diabetes causes hair loss, which I will cover later in this article. But it's also worth knowing that thinning hair can also indicate two other related conditions - insulin resistance pre-diabetes Insulin resistance is a precursor to pre-diabetes and BOTH conditions are precursors to type 2 diabetes. More About Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes When insulin levels in the body remain sufficiently high over an extended period of time, the body's sensitivity to the hormone begins to decline. This is called insulin resistance. A difficult condition to reverse, insulin resistance causes symptoms that include high blood pressure, lethargy and hunger. It's a 'vicious circle', because the increased insulin levels and weight gain make the insulin resistance even worse. Eventually it can develop into pre-diabetes, which doctors can identify by increased glucose levels in the blood. Research supports the fact that women with insulin resistance are at risk of hair loss - so it's certainl Continue reading >>

More in diabetes