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Diabetes And Gout

I Have Been Diagnosed With Gout And Have Type 1 Diabetes. Any Suggestions About Diet?

I Have Been Diagnosed With Gout And Have Type 1 Diabetes. Any Suggestions About Diet?

A: Gout is a type of arthritis caused by high blood uric acid levels. Gout “attacks” joints, often resulting in extreme pain due to a build-up of uric acid crystals. In the past, people with gout used to manage it by making changes in their diet. Today, there are effective medicines that can better treat it and reduce the number of flare-ups. However, dietary changes may still be helpful. A diet for gout limits purines, which are found primarily in animal foods (meat, seafood, poultry and organ meats). You don’t have to stop eating these foods, but it’s a good idea to limit your portions of these foods to about 4 to 6 ounces per day. It’s also important to limit your intake of alcoholic beverages (especially beer) to no more than one to two servings per day, as alcohol can hinder the body’s ability to get rid of uric acid. If you have a flare-up, avoid drinking alcohol until it subsides. Drink plenty of water to help flush out uric acid, and consider adding some fat free or low fat dairy foods to your eating plan, such as nonfat or lowfat milk or yogurt, as some studies show that dairy foods may help prevent gout. Finally, being overweight puts you at risk for gout, so losing weight, if you need to, may lower your chances of a flare-up. A “diet” for gout should not greatly affect your diabetes, provided that you’re controlling or counting your carbohydrates and not missing meals. Consider meeting with a dietitian if you need help with carb counting and/or insulin adjustments around your carb intake, and/or if you’d like guidance for weight loss. Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Gout

The Link Between Diabetes And Gout

If you have type 2 diabetes, your chances of getting gout are higher. And the same is true in reverse. Gout boosts your chance of diabetes. Gout is a kind of arthritis that causes sudden pain and swelling in your joints. It usually shows up first in the big toe, but it can occur in other joints too. The pain can be intense. Some things raise your risk for both diabetes and gout, but you can manage many of the causes of these conditions. What Causes Gout? Gout usually happens when uric acid builds up in the blood (a condition called hyperuricemia). This acid is a waste that your body makes when it breaks down purines, substances found in your body tissue and some foods. Normally, the acid dissolves in your blood, passes through your kidneys, and leaves when you pee. If your body makes extra uric acid, or if the kidneys can’t clear enough of it, the levels of the acid in your blood get too high. With time, the acid forms crystals that get stuck in your joints or soft tissue. That’s what causes the painful symptoms. A first attack of gout may last a week to 10 days. It’s estimated that almost 85% of people who have it once have another episode within 3 years. Gout often runs in families. So if a parent, brother, or sister has it, you might get it too. The Gout-Diabetes Link People with type 2 diabetes are more likely to have hyperuricemia, and people with gout and high uric acid are more likely to get diabetes. Not everyone with hyperuricemia gets gout, but your chances go up as uric acid levels rise. Type 2 diabetes happens when your body doesn’t use insulin well and sugar stays in the blood instead of moving into cells. This is called insulin resistance. Studies show this may play a role in the development of gout and hyperuricemia may make insulin resistance wor Continue reading >>

How To Eat When You Have Gout & Diabetes

How To Eat When You Have Gout & Diabetes

Gout is a form of arthritis that is often characterized by severe and sudden pain. Most commonly, symptoms of gout are felt in the big toe but can also affect other joints. According to the Purine Research Society, gout is one of the oldest known metabolic diseases and is caused by an overproduction of uric acid. A study published in the "New Zealand Medical Journal" found that patients with type-2 diabetes have a greater chance of developing gout. Eating foods lower in uric acid may help to reduce the chances of another painful gout attack. Video of the Day Limit animal proteins in your diet. According to the Mayo Clinic, all animal products contain purines which can cause higher uric acid. Animal proteins with the most purines include organ meats, red meat and fatty fish. Add more vegetables, fruits and whole wheat grains to your diet. These foods provide vitamins and minerals and help to maintain a healthy balance in your body. Increase your water intake. Water can help to remove any uric acid buildup in your body. Drink at least eight glasses of water a day. Avoid drinking alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the uric acid removal in your body. Eat nonfat dairy products to reduce your chances of a gout flare-up. According to the Mayo Clinic, some research has linked lower fat dairy products to a lower risk of gout. Avoid sugar. If you have diabetes, limiting your sugar intake is important for your health. Staying away from sugar is also important if you have had gout in the past. Although it is not known if sugar has an effect on uric acids in your body, eating sugar leads to obesity which is a risk factor for gout. Continue reading >>

Gout And Diabetes – The Connection

Gout And Diabetes – The Connection

Gout is a form of chronic arthritis that can lead to pain, swelling and ultimately joint destruction and kidney problems. Gout and diabetes have some of the same risk factors. Learn more about the connection between gout and diabetes and what you can do about it. Gout occurs when high levels of uric acid crystallize and are deposited around the joints and in soft tissue. This can lead to a type of inflammatory arthritis, causing pain, swelling and itchiness in areas such as the big toe, ankles, wrists, fingers, knees, heels and elbows. If gout is untreated, the uric acid crystals can become hardened lumps that can lead to compromised joints and kidney problems. Gout has been linked with diabetes for years. Diabetes and gout share a few common risk factors. Being overweight or obese can make people more prone to developing diabetes type 2 and/or gout. Other factors include insulin resistance, decreased circulation, elevated uric acid levels, a diet high in saturated fats and a lack of exercise. Gout occurs when too much uric acid is formed and the kidneys cannot process it. Risks for gout can include excessive alcohol use, genetic tendencies, illness or surgery, taking diuretics, joint injury and high blood fat levels as well as radiation, chemotherapy, certain medications, fad dieting, consuming excessive fructose (such as the type found in sweetened sodas) and eating a lot of shellfish, red meat and/or liver. A simple blood test can be done to determine your level of uric acid and whether you are prone to developing gout. People with elevated levels of uric acid are also more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease. To reduce the chance of developing gout, eat a well-balanced diet with limited animal protein. Minimize your intake of red meat, shellfish and organ m Continue reading >>

Does Gout Cause Diabetes?

Does Gout Cause Diabetes?

A study published in October, 2014, did find a link between gout and type 2 diabetes – specifically, it showed that having gout appears to increase the risk of developing diabetes, particularly among women. However, while both conditions have several risk factors in common, the connection between them isn’t clear. The study found an association, but it didn’t prove cause and effect. Researchers from the U.S. and the U.K. followed more than 35,000 gout patients in Great Britain, gathering data on both women (9,693) and men (25,646). The investigators also compared the data from the gout patients with information on just over 137,000 people who didn’t have gout. After comparing all the medical facts, the research team found that women who had gout were 71 percent more likely to develop diabetes than a comparable group of women who didn’t have gout. Among men, those with gout had a 22 percent increased risk. Gout is an inherited metabolic disorder that can cause a type of arthritis. It usually affects the big toe but can also occur in other joints including the ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers and elbows. Attacks can be extremely painful and are worsened by being on your feet. The hallmark of gout is elevated blood levels of uric acid, a breakdown product of protein metabolism. In news reports, the study’s lead researcher, Hyon Choi, M.D. of Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital, suggested that ongoing low levels of inflammation due to gout might increase the risk of diabetes. The risk factors the two diseases have in common are high cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity. Gout is also associated with metabolic syndrome, and an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and premature death, the researchers noted. Excess alcohol consumption and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gout

Diabetes And Gout

diabetes and gout a troublesome combination Diabetes and Gout; Of the millions of people world wide suffering Gout , there is a large proportion of sufferers who also have Diabetes. Diabetes and Gout. This association is quite obvious for the following reasons: Gout is associated with Obesity. Gout is also associated with Hypertension or high blood pressure. Diabetes is associated with : High blood pressure , Obesity ( obviously high blood sugar - but I am relating this to gout at this stage) Both are a Metabolic Disorder . Both have a potential genetic inheritance . Both can be partially treated by keeping your weight under control, eating low fat foods, keeping your intake of vegetables and whole grain foods up, and exercising. Both require a reduction of fats and oils, sugars, meat, eggs, full cream milk and poultry. Diabetes and Gout ; Both Afflictions have different levels : Gout : Asymptomatic Acute Interval Chronic Tophaceous Diabetes: So what is Diabetes Like gout Diabetes is a chronic condition, ( persistent or long lasting in all of its effects) Insulin is needed to convert glucose or sugar from the food we eat into energy. People with diabetic issues generally have no production of low production of insulin causing the sugar or glucose levels to stay in our blood stream. the glucose in our blood is called glycaemia. Pre - diabetes This is where the fasting blood glucose os elevated higher than is considered normal levels but not high enough to be classified as Type 2 Diabetes, but can process to type 2 diabetes easily if not monitored. Type 1 diabetes - 10 - 15% of all diabetic cases are Type 1. Generally Type 1 diabetes can be linked to genetic inheritance. A healthy lifestyle is required to help maintain this disease. Typical symptoms are excessive thirst, Continue reading >>

Gout May Be Linked To Raised Diabetes Risk: Study

Gout May Be Linked To Raised Diabetes Risk: Study

HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gout, a form of inflammatory arthritis, appears to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, especially in women, a new study finds. Researchers followed more than 35,000 gout sufferers in the United Kingdom and found that women with gout were 71 percent more likely to develop diabetes compared with people without gout. For men, the increased risk was 22 percent. "Gout seems to be contributing to the risk of diabetes independently of other diabetes risk factors, such as obesity," said lead researcher Dr. Hyon Choi, from the division of rheumatology, allergy, and immunology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Gout causes intense pain and swelling in single joints, most often the feet, especially the joint at the base of the big toe. More than 3 million Americans suffer from the condition, men more often than women, according to the American College of Rheumatology. People with gout have excess uric acid in the body, which forms needle-like crystals that lodge in the joints. Diabetes, characterized by high blood sugar levels, can lead to kidney damage, heart disease and limb amputations over time. Clarifying its relationship to gout "is essential," the study authors said. However, while the current research suggests gout raises the risk of diabetes, the study can't prove it. "The association is clearly there, but why that is so isn't known," Choi said. Choi speculates that ongoing, low-level inflammation from gout may increase the risk for diabetes. Other risk factors shared by both diseases -- high cholesterol and high blood pressure, for example -- might also increase the risk, he said. The researchers used data from health records on adult patients from January 1995 to May 2010. They zeroed in on about 35 Continue reading >>

Gout And Diabetes

Gout And Diabetes

Once termed “the kings’ disease,” gout used to be a problem primarily for wealthy people and royalty who lounged around drinking wine and eating rich food. But today, an estimated 68% of American adults are either overweight or obese. As a result, gout and type 2 diabetes -- two diseases that can result from an unhealthy lifestyle -- are sharply on the rise. Gout is an arthritic condition caused by having an excess buildup of uric acid. It causes sudden, extreme attacks of pain, swelling, and redness. Gouty arthritis most often strikes the big toe, but it also can show up in the feet, ankles, knees, hands, and wrists. Type 2 diabetes, a disease characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood, also can result from eating too much and moving too little. Gout and type 2 diabetes often co-exist in people with common physical characteristics and conditions, the most prominent being obesity. “A lot of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes are the same for gout,” says Michele Meltzer, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia who specializes in gout. By changing these risk factors, you can help prevent or fight both diseases. Here’s what you can do: Lose weight. “We are digging our graves with our forks in this country,” says John D. Reveille, MD, director of the division of rheumatology at UT Health Medical School in Houston. To prevent gout, type 2 diabetes, and a host of other health problems, he says you should keep a close eye on your body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. According to the National Institutes of Health, waist size becomes very important when a person’s body mass index (BMI) is between 25 and 34.9. A BMI over 25 is considered overweight, and a BMI greater than 30 is considered obese. Kee Continue reading >>

Gout And Diabetes

Gout And Diabetes

Tweet Gout is a form of arthritis (inflammation of joints) caused by high levels of uric acid. Gout can be a painful condition but one that can be managed to reduce the frequency at which gout attacks occur. Gout is known to affect around 1 in 100 people in the UK and is around four times more common in men than in women. Research shows that people with gout are significantly more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people without gout. Gout and diabetes A number of research papers have shown associations between gout and type 2 diabetes including a study from Harvard Medical School, published in 2014, which showed gout to be associated with a 70 increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A common medication for treating gout, allopurinol, has shown promise for reducing thickening of heart muscle and is currently undergoing testing as a possible medication for reducing risk of diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease). Symptoms of gout Gout is characterised by swelling of joints. The base of the big toe is most commonly affected by gout. More than one joint may be affected by gout in some people. Symptoms can come on quickly, with swelling occurring within a few hours. The swollen joint can be very painful and sensitive to touch. During swelling, skin covering the joint may typically turn red and shiny in appearance. The swelling and symptoms may occur for several days if not treated. Once the inflammation has subsided, the skin on the joint may become itchy and flaky. Causes of gout Gout occurs if high levels of uric acid in the blood leads to crystals of sodium urate forming in and around the joints. If these crystals spill into the joint space, this can cause the joint to become inflamed. Risk factors High levels of uric acid are more likely to build if you have an Continue reading >>

Bidirectional Association Between Diabetes And Gout: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

Bidirectional Association Between Diabetes And Gout: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

Go to: We aimed to prospectively investigate the bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gout. We analyzed follow-up data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, when self-reports of diagnosed diabetes and gout were enquired at follow-ups I and II. Individuals who participated in both follow-ups and were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at follow-up I were included. For T2D to gout (analysis I), prevalent gout were further excluded (final n = 31,137). For gout to T2D (analysis II), prevalent diabetes were excluded (final n = 28,668). Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs). In the analysis I, the RR of diabetes to incident gout (682 cases) was 0.77 (95% CI 0.60–0.97). In the analysis II, the RR of gout to incident diabetes (2223 cases) was 1.36 (1.12–1.63), but became insignificant after adjustment for hypertension and BMI (1.00; 0.83–1.21). The gout to diabetes association was modified by BMI (Pinteraction = 0.04) and hypertension (Pinteraction = 0.007), and it was marginally significant in adults with BMI<24 while significant among non-hypertensive participants, but not in their counterparts. In conclusion, our results suggest that diabetes is associated with a lower risk of incident gout, while gout is positively related to diabetes among normal weight and non-hypertensive adults. Continue reading >>

Gout: The Disease Of Kings… And Everyone Else (part 1)

Gout: The Disease Of Kings… And Everyone Else (part 1)

You might be thinking that it’s a little bit odd to be writing about gout on a diabetes Web site. What could the two conditions possibly have in common, you ask? Surprisingly (or perhaps not), quite a bit. Gout is a type of chronic, progressive arthritis that occurs when high levels of uric acid get deposited as crystals around the joints and sometimes, in soft tissue. The uric acid crystals cause an inflammatory type of arthritis that leads to pain (often very intense), redness, and swelling. The most commonly affected joint is the big toe, but the ankle, heels, knees, wrists, fingers, and elbows may be, as well. Left untreated, uric acid crystals can form hardened lumps in the joints and in tissues, leading to joint destruction, kidney damage, and kidney stones. Gout has been termed the “disease of kings” because it used to be that royalty and other wealthy folks were afflicted (after dining on too much rich food and drink). Even Saint Gregory the Great suffered from this painful condition. However, gout doesn’t discriminate: According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2008, almost 4% of adult Americans have had gout at some point. Men suffer more than women (6% of men versus 2% of women). And gout is on the increase. Gout and Diabetes Linking gout with diabetes isn’t anything new. In fact, the possibility of a connection was established in the late 18th century. But it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to make sense of this connection: As overweight and obesity increase, so does the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes and gout. People with gout and people with Type 2 diabetes share some common risk factors: • Being overweight or obese (for the most part) • Not getting enough physical activity • High uric acid levels • Insulin Continue reading >>

Gout & Diabetes

Gout & Diabetes

If you have gout, you may be at risk for diabetes. Research has shown a link between gout and diabetes. People who have gout and elevated uric acid levels are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. At the same time, those who already have type 2 diabetes are more likely to have high levels of uric acid in the blood – or hyperuricemia – which is the root cause of gout. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are above normal, due to either a lack of insulin in the blood or resistance to the insulin. Studies have shown that insulin resistance may play a role in developing gout and that hyperuricemia may worsen insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has also been associated with obesity and high blood pressure, which are risk factors for gout. Like gout, diabetes has been linked to other serious health issues, such as heart disease and kidney damage. Controlling blood sugar and uric acid levels can help to make both diabetes and gout easier to manage. While anyone with gout can develop diabetes, risk is especially high among women – with recent studies showing that women who have gout are 71 percent more likely to develop diabetes than women who do not have gout. Control Gout and Protect Your Long-Term Health Maintaining a healthy serum uric acid level of 6 mg/dL or below is important to reduce risk for gout and diabetes. Ask your doctor for a routine serum uric acid blood test to see if you have elevated uric acid. Your doctor can also run tests to measure your blood sugar level. If your uric acid levels are high, your doctor may prescribe medications to help keep levels low and reduce your risk for future gout flares. It is important to take these medications as prescribed – and not to stop them without talking with the doctor. It is also imp Continue reading >>

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

How To Eat When You Have Gout And Diabetes

1 Avoid purine-rich foods. Since uric acid is produced from the metabolism of purine in the body, it is best to avoid foods that contain purine. Urate crystals accumulate in the joints if uric acid is elevated and this can aggravate joint pain in gout. Also, uric acid elevation can increase insulin resistance which is a condition wherein the body do not respond to the function of insulin[1]. This can further elevate the blood sugar levels of a person, leading to diabetic symptoms. Purine-rich foods are mackerel, anchovies, organ meats, dried beans, peas, canned goods, instant noodles, wine and beer. 2 Avoid foods rich in fructose. Foods rich in fructose consume a lot of adenosine triphosphate (or ATP) when metabolized. This ATP is an energy-supplying molecule that the cells in the body use. Over-consumption of ATP leads to its depletion and results in the generation of substances such as lactic acid and uric acid, thereby increasing the levels of uric acid in the blood. Also, fructose is considered a sugar. Consuming foods rich in fructose can elevate the blood sugar of a person and lead to occurrence of symptoms. Foods to avoid are apples, bananas, pears, agave, melons, asparagus, beans, broccoli, cabbage, onion, tomato, peanuts, raisins, figs, carbonated drinks, fruit drinks, ketchup, canned goods, chocolate, pastries and breakfast cereals. 3 Avoid alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the removal of uric acid from the body. When alcohol is converted to lactic acid, it reduces the amount of uric acid that is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. This is because the lactic acid competes with the uric acid in terms of being removed by the kidneys through urine. Increased levels of ethanol (alcohol) in the body increase the body's production of uric acid by increasing Continue reading >>

How Should You Eat If You Have Diabetes And Gout? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

How Should You Eat If You Have Diabetes And Gout? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

It's easy to get answers about health and nutrition! Just send your question by email to [email protected] and Dr. Harlan will respond to selected questions of general interest. Answers will be posted in the Ask Dr. Gourmet newsletter ( sign up now!) and archived in the Ask Dr. Gourmet section of the website. Please note that the Ask Dr. Gourmet feature is restricted to questions regarding food and nutrition. Due to the many questions we receive, not all questions may be answered. For more specific questions about your individual health, please contact your doctor. About Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy What is the best diet for both diabetes and gout? I have a friend who lives with both diabetes and gout. He doesn't handle either of these conditions particularly well. He and his wife recently went to a small seminar and asked the dietitian there for some tips on handling diet when one does have both diabetes and gout. She was really unable to answer him! She didn't even refer him to some literature or advise him where to find good information. So, I was just wondering if you could offer some advice regarding this. I appreciate any information you can provide. The key to treating both conditions can be found in a healthier diet. For diabetics diet is the cornerstone of controlling blood sugar. The information about Mediterranean diet can help you to understand the foundations of the diet recommended by the American Diabetic Association. This is your friend's first step toward feeling better. You can find information on the Mediterranean diet here on this website. Gout can be well controlled in many folks with change in diet and lifestyle. Excess animal proteins are what leads to issues with gout more than any single food. Here's our Continue reading >>

Does Having Gout Increase My Chances Of Developing Diabetes?

Does Having Gout Increase My Chances Of Developing Diabetes?

Many of the people who suffer from gout also suffer from diabetes or eventually will. Both diseases have been with us for thousands of years. Having one condition elevates the risk of developing the other. The possibility of a connection was affirmed in the late 18th century but again it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to come to this conclusion. This is obviously due to the fact that gout is linked with obesity, hypertension and little exercise or high blood pressure. Diabetes a disease of high blood sugar is also associated with obesity, hypertension, not enough physical activity and high blood pressure. Gout and diabetes are metabolic disorders and if you have both diseases or either one, strong chances they were inherited from your genetic makeup. But more likely than that, you probably had the same bad eating habits that both or one of your parents had and then went on to develop gout and/or diabetes, by watching your mom or dad, you instilled those bad eating habits and allowed it to happen to you. Furthermore, both diseases are associated with poor blood circulation in the body especially the limbs and insulin resistance in diabetes plays a big part in the potential development of gout. Remember that in some advanced cases of diabetes, gangrene occurs in the foot making amputation necessary. Sadly, both diseases can also kill you and lead you to a poorer quality of life. But it’s the poor circulation, the most likely reason why the risk of gout is relatively high in people with diabetes. Poor blood circulation means you have higher uric acid levels, making the kidneys slow and inefficient in releasing it out to your urine. In addition, your blood is overly acidic and your pH levels are off balance. Evidence of gout and diabetes New studies indicate that you h Continue reading >>

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