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Diabetes And Fruit

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Save for later Although we know fruits and vegetables are good for us people with diabetes are often told they can’t eat fruit because they are too sweet or contain sugar. All fruits contain natural sugar, but also contain a good mix of vitamins, minerals and fibre. Why are fruit and vegetables so good for us? Eating fruits and vegetables lowers the risk of developing many health conditions including high blood pressure, heart diseases, strokes, obesity and certain cancers. It’s even more important for people with diabetes to eat more fruits and vegetables as most of these conditions are more likely to affect them. Fruits and vegetables have a good mix of soluble and insoluble fibre which is good for your bowels and general health – so it makes sense to eat more of them Should people with diabetes cut back on fruit because of sugar content? Managing diabetes has to do with managing your blood glucose, blood fats, blood pressure and your weight, and fruits and vegetables can play a positive role in all these. The concern has been that because fruits contain sugar, it makes your blood glucose go up. In fact, most fruits have low to medium glycaemic index, so they do not lead to a sharp rise in your blood glucose levels compared to other carbohydrate containing foods like white or wholemeal bread. Portion size is very important when considering the biggest effects on your blood glucose levels so let’s look at this in more detail. A portion of fruit contains about 15-20g carbohydrate on average, which is similar to a slice of bread. To put things in perspective, just a can of cola contains 35g carb and a medium slice of chocolate cake contains 35g of carbs as well. So, if you are looking to reduce your carb intake, with the aim to manage blood glucose levels, the ad Continue reading >>

Stone Fruits May Help To Reverse Type Ii Diabetes

Stone Fruits May Help To Reverse Type Ii Diabetes

More than 25 million people in the United States suffer from diabetes, and doctors estimate there are tens of millions more who are borderline diabetic. If you are diabetic or have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, there’s hope — diabetes is one of the few major diseases that is not only reversible, but also 100% preventable with proper diet and exercise. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that disrupts the body’s production of insulin, affecting how we process our main source of fuel: glucose. Approximately 90% of all diabetics are type 2. This high percentage is very probably linked to the most common trait among diagnosed cases: obesity. Diabetes: A Growing Epidemic Food scientist Luis Cisneros-Zevallos and colleagues from Texas AgriLife Research conducted a study that demonstrated that compounds found in stone fruits, such as peaches and plums, may help protect against metabolic syndrome, in which inflammation and obesity trigger chronic diseases and other health problems. Cisneros-Zevallos stated, “In recent years obesity has become a major concern in society due to the health problems associated with it. In the U.S., statistics show that around 30% of the population is overweight or obese, and these cases are increasing every year in alarming numbers.” Explaining the team’s results, he added, “Our work indicates that phenolic compounds present in these fruits have anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic properties in different cell lines and may also reduce the oxidation of bad cholesterol LDL which is associated with cardiovascular disease.” Cisneros-Zevallos and his group also noted that stone fruits provided a defense against breast cancer and a significant boost to the immune system. How Fruit and Diabetes Go Together To Help Reduce Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fruit Consumption: Should You Eat It?

Diabetes And Fruit Consumption: Should You Eat It?

Many people with diabetes worry that they should avoid fruit juices, certain types of fruits, or fruits altogether! Even some physicians make special recommendations on fruits and fruit juices for their patients who have diabetes. For example, it is not uncommon to see a No fruit or fruit juice designation in the morning on a particular patient's meal plan. So what's going on? Why are diabetics sometimes told not to have it? First, let's be clear: fruit is good for us! It contains fiber, vitamins, electrolytes, fluids, and minerals that are very important for the body. Additionally, fruit contains carbohydrates and a little protein depending on the fruit. Typically, there is little to no fat in fruit, so no need to worry on that front! But many diabetics are told to watch their carbohydrate consumption - some fruits are higher in carbohydrates and the natural sugars they contain can be more easily and quickly absorbed by the body. But this doesn't inherently mean you should not include fruit in your well-balanced diet. Opt for fruits higher in fiber, which help balance blood sugars over time, and budget for the extra carbs fruit can account for. Let's think about bananas for a minute. Most people may have a banana with cereal, so they're adding this carbohydrate to cereal (a carb) and dairy (a carb), so decreasing the portion size becomes imperative to prevent over-consumption of carbohydrates at that meal. Watermelon is typically portioned in ball-size measurements. But, let's be honest, most people don’t consume one cup of watermelon balls! However, this portion is an optimal way to have a sweet treat without exceeding your carbohydrate allowance. It's important to note the rest of the meal would need more fiber as the watermelon is very low in fiber. Fruits like ap Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tip: Eat Dragon Fruit To Manage Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Tip: Eat Dragon Fruit To Manage Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetics have to think twice before they indulge in their favourite fruit treats. Nutritious yet high glycaemic fruits like bananas, pineapples and watermelons do have a dubious reputation of causing a spike in blood sugar levels. But a good dose of fruit is important for diabetics from an overall health perspective. Fruits provides essential micronutrients and fibre, which keeps the body healthy. Instead of omitting them completely out of your diet, diabetics should try to include low and medium glycaemic fruits like apples, strawberries and oranges in their diet. One of the best fruits for diabetics is the dragon fruit. Here are some of the other health benefits of dragon fruit. This exotic-looking fruit belongs to the cactus species and is native to the Americas. It’s also quite popular in Asian countries like Thailand where it is known by the name pitaya. Several studies have found that this tart-tasting fruit can be beneficial for diabetics because of its rich nutrient profile. It is so nutritious, some studies also consider using it as a potential diabetes treatment. Animal-based studies have found that the dragon fruit produces an anti-diabetic effect by regenerating pancreatic beta cells and reducing obesity risks. Another study also explored its effect on prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. It was noted that high doses of the fruit helped in reducing blood sugar levels in diabetic patients. It also protects against insulin resistance and diet-induced fatty liver problems.Diabetics are also at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, which can be effectively brought down regular consumption of dragon fruit since it controls oxidative damage and reduce aortic stiffness in diabetic patients. Dragon fruit is slowly losing its exotic status and can be bought ev Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Fruits For Diabetes!

The Best And Worst Fruits For Diabetes!

Fruits make a crucial component of a regular healthy and balanced diet which helps in promoting health in a great manner. There are various fruits which make up a great choice in various illnesses because of the carbohydrate, protein, fiber and nutrient contents present in them. However if you are having diabetes, there might be some fruits which can be a wrong choice in your diet. In this present article we will talk about some of the best fruits and few of the worst fruits for diabetes. Below are some of the best fruits for diabetes which can help in improving the condition with the natural diet. Berries are Safe for Diabetics: Antioxidants are known to be present in huge amount in the berries including the strawberries, blueberries, etc. It is confirmed that berries are a wonderful fruit for diabetic patients as they contain antioxidants along with vitamins and fiber and also low carbohydrate content. Peaches-A Good Choice of Fruit for Diabetics: Low carbohydrate content in the peaches makes it a good fruit for diabetic patients. Peaches contain vitamin A and C, potassium and fiber in good quantity. This also helps in improving the diabetic condition. Peaches can be taken on their own or can be tossed in to the iced tea. Tart Cherries: Because of the low carbohydrate content, tart cherries can be included under the best diabetic diet. It is recently found that tart cherries are wonderful in fighting against inflammation because of the fact that they contain anti- inflammatory agents in them. Apples: Loaded with fiber, vitamin C, low carb etc apples make another great fruit for diabetic patients. It is good to take the apple without peeling it. Apricot: Apricots contain low carbohydrates, vitamins and fibers in it which makes them a super diet for diabetes. Apricots c Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year time period, researchers analyzed the diet and health outcomes of more than 500,000 Chinese adults. The researchers found that higher fruit consumption was not associated with higher blood sugar, even for people with diabetes. Adults who consumed fruit more frequently actually had a lower risk of developing diabetes. The study only analyzed fresh fruit consumption, not dried fruit or fruit juice, so we turned to a few registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators to clarify the best and worst fruits, appropriate serving sizes, and how many carbohydrates you should get from fruit each day. First it's important to note that "diabetes care is individualized," says Staci Freeworth, RD, CDE, and professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. This is why it is important for people with diabetes to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). These specialists can break down how many carbohydrates you should be eating each day based on your individual needs and health history. Best Fruits to Eat Recipe to Try: Purple Fruit Salad Whether you have diabetes or not, the consensus from dietitians is the same regarding which fruits are best to eat. "The best fruits for everyone to eat are the ones that create the least influence on blood sugar, often termed 'low glycemic load,'—even if you don't have diabetes," says Daphne Olivier, RD, CDE, founder of My Food Coach. "These in Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Fruit Juice While whole fruits are a healthy, fiber-rich carbohydrate option for diabetics, the same can’t be said for fruit juice. They may offer more nutritional benefit than soda and other sugary drinks, but fruit juices — even 100 percent fruit juices — are chock full of fruit sugar, and therefore cause a sharp spike in blood sugar. Skipping the glass of juice and opting for the fiber-packed whole fruit counterpart will help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and fill you up on fewer calories, aiding in weight loss. For a refreshing and healthy drink alternative, choose zero-calorie plain or naturally-flavored seltzer and jazz it up with a wedge of lemon or lime. Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes - Can I Eat Fruit?

Fruit And Diabetes - Can I Eat Fruit?

Tweet Along with vegetables, fruit is one of the healthiest food groups and contains an important source of vitamin C which helps to keep our cells healthy. Can someone with diabetes eat fruit? People with diabetes can eat fruit. However, fruit can be quite sugary so bear this in mind to prevent blood sugar levels rising too high Daily recommendations of fruit The Department of Health advises us to consume at least 5 portions of fruit or vegetables a day. The American Diabetes Associations recommends fruit as a good option if you’re having a dessert. Effect on diabetes Fruit is naturally quite high in sugars and fruit will typically have more carbohydrate than non-starchy vegetables. Some fruits are more sugary than others. For example, banana and oranges are examples of more sugary fruits whereas berries are examples of less sugary fruits. You may find therefore that you need to choose smaller portions of certain fruits depending on your blood glucose levels. Fruit juices and smoothies typically contain a lot of fruit sugar so exercise caution with how much fruit juice you consume. Health benefits of fruit Fruit helps to supply us with fibre, minerals and vitamins, and they are particularly high in their supply of vitamin C. Vitamin C is important for preventing our cells being damaged. Fibre helps digestion and is linked with helping reduce cholesterol levels. As with vegetables, different fruit have different characteristics. For example grapefruit contains a healthy amount of vitamin A and potassium whereas berries are good sources of vitamin K and manganese. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note that eating the recommended quantity of fruit and vegetables may reduce susceptibility to chronic disease and cancers. Which fruits are lowest in carbs? Continue reading >>

Daily Diet Of Fresh Fruit Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

Daily Diet Of Fresh Fruit Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

"Eating fresh fruit daily could cut risk of diabetes by 12%," the Mail Online reports. A study of half a million people in China found those who ate fruit daily were 12% less likely to get type 2 diabetes than those who never or rarely ate it. It was also found that people with diabetes at the start of the study who ate fruit regularly were slightly less likely to die, or to get complications of diabetes, such as eye problems (diabetic retinopathy), during the study than those who ate fruit rarely or never. Many people with diabetes in China avoid eating fruit, because they are told it raises blood sugar. However, the study suggests fresh fruit may actually be beneficial for people with and without diabetes. Fruits which release sugars more slowly into the blood, such as apples, pears and oranges, are the most popular in China, according to the researchers. So this may be the preferred option if you are worried about diabetes risk, or have been diagnosed with diabetes. The study doesn't show that fruit directly prevents diabetes or diabetes complications, as an inherent limitation of this type of study is that other factors could be involved. And it doesn't tell us how much fruit might be too much. Overall, the research suggests fresh fruit can be part of a healthy diet for everyone. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Oxford, and Peking University, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Non-communicable Disease Prevention and Control Department, and Pengzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, all in China. It was funded by the Kadoorie Charitable Foundation. The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Medicine on an open-access basis, so Continue reading >>

10 Low-glycemic Fruits For Diabetes

10 Low-glycemic Fruits For Diabetes

We humans come by our sweet tooth naturally — Our bodies need carbohydrates because they provide energy to cells. But for the body to be able to use it for energy, we need insulin. When our bodies don’t produce any insulin or are unable to use it (type 1 diabetes) or make enough of it properly (type 2 diabetes), we’re at risk for high blood sugar levels. High levels can lead to chronic complications such as nerve, eye, or kidney damage. The glycemic index (GI) tells you how quickly foods containing carbohydrates affect your blood sugar level when eaten by themselves. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), GI scores are rated as: Low: 55 or below Moderate: 56 to 69 High: 70 and above The lower the GI score, the more slowly the rise in blood sugar, which can help the body better manage post-meal changes. Most whole fruits have a low to moderate GI. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. A more useful estimation of the food-blood sugar effect is the glycemic load (GL), which has more narrow categories of low, medium and high foods. This calculation takes into account the GI, plus the grams of carbohydrates per serving of the food. Though each person living with diabetes responds to or tolerates carbohydrate choices and amounts differently, GL better estimates the possible real-life impact when someone eats a particular food. To calculate the GL yourself, use this equation: GL equals the GI, multiplied by the grams of carbohydrates, divided by 100. Low: 0 to 10 Moderate: 11 to 19 High: 20 and above GI score: 20 GL score: 6 Cherries are high in potassium and packed with antioxidants, which will give your immune system a boost. Because cherries have a short growing season, it can be tough to get them fresh. However, canned ta Continue reading >>

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Top 3 Diabetes Myths, Busted: Fruit, Starchy Vegetables, And Blood Glucose

Almost 10 percent of Americans have diabetes and that number is growing. Unfortunately, the myths surrounding diabetes are as widespread as the disorder itself. Here we debunk the most common diabetes myths. For the past 50 years, people diagnosed with all forms of diabetes have been advised to eat low-carb diets high in fat and protein, and to avoid eating high-carbohydrate foods like fruits, potatoes, squash, corn, beans, lentils, and whole grains. Despite this popular opinion, more than 85 years of scientific research clearly demonstrates that a low-fat, plant-based whole foods diet is the single most effective dietary approach for managing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This means that a low-fat diet—not a low-carb diet—has been shown across the board to minimize oral medication and insulin use, stabilize blood glucose, and dramatically reduce long-term disease risk in people with diabetes. Myth #1: You Develop Type 2 Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar Eating sweets is not a direct cause of type 2 diabetes. People develop type 2 diabetes over time by slowly developing a resistance to insulin, the hormone that escorts glucose out of your blood and into tissues like your muscle and liver. I like to think of type 2 diabetes as a very advanced form of insulin resistance in which glucose remains trapped in your blood because your body cannot use insulin properly. In this way, elevated blood glucose is a symptom of diabetes, and NOT the root cause. The real cause of insulin resistance is dietary fat. We discussed it at length in this article. People with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are told to eat foods that are low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein simply because they don’t create an immediate need for insulin. But in the hours and days after a meal hi Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Really? Diabetics Should Avoid Eating Fruit

Really? Diabetics Should Avoid Eating Fruit

THE FACTS For most people, eating fruit goes along with a healthy diet. But for people with diabetes, it’s a different story. Should fruit be kept to a minimum or even avoided altogether because of its sugar content? Or do the fiber and other nutrients it contains minimize its effect on blood sugar? Because of a lack of research, and conflicting advice, there has not been a clear answer. But a new study in Nutrition Journal should provide some guidance: It found that restricting fruit intake did not seem to benefit diabetics. In the study, the first randomized trial to address the issue, researchers recruited 63 overweight men and women with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. All of the subjects were given medical care and nutrition advice, including suggestions to limit calories. But some were randomly assigned to limit their fruit intake, while a second group was instructed to eat at least two pieces of fruit daily. The goal was to see how this affected their levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, which provides an indication of blood sugar level over time. The first group ended up consuming about 135 grams of fruit a day, roughly equivalent to a single orange or banana, while the second group consumed about 320 grams of fruit daily. After 12 weeks, both groups had lost weight and had smaller waists, but those who ate more fruit had the greatest reductions. And there was no significant difference between the two groups when it came to their blood sugar measures. “Considering the many possible beneficial effects of fruit,” the authors wrote, “we recommend that fruit intake should not be restricted in Type 2 diabetic subjects.” THE BOTTOM LINE Avoiding fruit may not prove beneficial for Type 2 diabetics, but more research is needed. Continue reading >>

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

Are you a diabetic? Are you worried about foods with a high glycemic index? Don’t worry. We are here to give you the best fruits that you can relish without worrying about your blood sugar levels. Would you like to know more? Keep reading! Diet For Diabetics: Diabetics do not have to eliminate all sugary foods from their regular meals. Sugar or glucose is a vital requirement for the human body. It fuels us with energy so that we can stay active all day. But when you have to deal with diabetes, it is necessary to take care of your sweet cravings in an appropriate manner. Hence, portion control is essential for every diabetic. So, what would be the best practical way to ensure diabetics get their required intake of sugar? Fruits: The Ultimate Food For Diabetics: Most would prefer a healthier and natural way, and what better way is there to go with than fruits! A quick light snack, an after meal desert, or simply blended and squeezed into a refreshing drink, fruits can be consumed in many ways. Fruits also provide us with roughage, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. But how would fruits benefit a diabetic? Well, in addition to the various nutrients fruits give, the simple sugars or carbs in them are a whole lot easier for the body to process. Also, these are the healthier kind of sugars the body needs. Diabetes may cause weight loss, resulting in severe health adversities. Including fruits in their diet regimen can contribute towards reducing the excessive weight of many diabetics. One of the effects of diabetes is that it makes people hungry all the time, and the intake of certain fruits can create the feeling of fullness. Again, too much of anything can prove to be bad for you. Thus, when consuming fruits, a diabetic must be cautious and careful while picking the fru Continue reading >>

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