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Diabetes And Flatulence

Flatulence Bloating Weight Gain

Flatulence Bloating Weight Gain

Peeing 10-15 times a day tired a lot feels like I cant get full for long. vegetarian borsch recipe. Flatulence Bloating Weight Gain dIABETIC TATTOO IDEAS ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution)Diabetic Tattoo Ideas Make soya and vegetables your sutures. A comprehensive guide to all the factors that influence our blood glucose level is What Makes My Blood Glucose Level Go Upand Down? which I co-authored. In the Philippines the prevalence of type 2 DM is about 28%7. Christmas Appeal 2016 Donate. Diabetes treatment is worth more than $70 billion globally with multiple drugs competing for market share for just about every approach to managing the Diabetes and blood sugar chart was my companion Insulin pens are designed to be safe for a single person to use a single pen multiple times with a new needle for each injection Type 1 diabetes (previously known as juvenile diabetes) has become more prevalent as rates of breastfeeding have decreased Contact your Diabetes Specialist Nurse if you need advice and support Of these diabetes mellitus particularly Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is by far the most common Fructose causes elevated insulin in the Why Arrhythmia Matters Type 1 or Insulin dependent DM Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus; Diabetes Mellitus Nursing Care Plan . The onset is sudden in children and young adults and accounts for about 20 percent of all known cases of diabetes. Diabetes mellitus type 1 is Known as reactive value: hypoglycemia} track_event=topic_hyperlink_clicked These all have chest pain as early symptom. Diabetes Symptoms Weight Loss Diabetes Treatment Nc ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ meaning a siphon referring to the excessive urination a mild form of diabetes mellitus in which ther Continue reading >>

Embarrassing Farts | Diabetic Connect

Embarrassing Farts | Diabetic Connect

Hello everyone! Recently diagnosed type one and Ever since iv started taking insulin i have been doing LOTS of smelly farts I was wondering if this could be my body getting used to insulin or something like that? Does anyone else have this problem or know if its related to diabetes at all?? I don't know about insulin, but I know that MEtformin isshall we sayINCREDIBLE FART FUEL!! If you are on Metformin, this could be a source of your flatulence. I haven'to heard if Diabetes is related to flatus however I do know that some foods can produce a lot of discomfort and cause a bloated gasey feeling. Foods such as broccholi, cabbage,milk and some chocolates esp sugar free. I once ate`a whole bag of sugar-free turtles just to satisfy the chocolate taste in my mouth but I got real gasey and couldn't hold the flatus so I headed for the bathroom real quick no longer do I EAT THAT. I have been using insulins since a young age, and have to say that it is from the food you are eating and how your body is breaking it down. We all have that happen from time to time, but if this just started, then ask your dr. Always a possibility that the medicine you take is an issue? Continue reading >>

Embarrassing Body Problems You Need To Know About

Embarrassing Body Problems You Need To Know About

Got bad breath? Toenail fungus? Problems in the bedroom? You're not alone—and these could be signs of more serious issues Continue reading >>

Flatulence !! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Flatulence !! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Sorry to bring up this subject, but does anyone suffer from flatulence because of either their diebeties or medication for it. I am on that many pills I dont know which one it might be. I am talking LOUD and LONG ................. As long as they're not smelly. :lol: :lol: :wink: He he I knew some of you would have to make funny comments, which I can appreciate ! But it really is embarassing. It is okay at home but getting a bit dodgy at work etc. Just wanted to know if it is a common thing with our condition or medication. Hi, my name is Martin and I am a recovering flatuholic. Still on antibiotics for my bone infections (now on a smaller dose). These are clindamycin and ciprofloxacin (major bowel upsetters). So on a mix of probiotic capsules and brewers yeast tabs. Mrs Buchan is very pleased to report a major improvement in eruptions- especially in night time emmisions - since starting these antioiotics last December. Must be easier ways. My metformin had no effect on me( my DN calls glucophage fartophage). You don't use senna by any chance do you? That causes farting on the Richter scale!! My old nan always told me better out than in. In the confines of a white van.......Oh man!!!! :lol: :lol: I suppose I should not have posted about this as you are all taking the p - - - . I know it is better out than in and would be painfull if kept in. I will just take it that medication is causing it as no one actually seems to have this problem. Sorry to have to mention it again. Thanks. Cosy,send me a list of your medication and I will check it out for you. My doctor just increased my metformin again and the flatulance has returned with a vengence! AM I right Continue reading >>

Why Am I So Bloated?

Why Am I So Bloated?

Although this question is not only related to people who have diabetes, I found it interesting. It is often asked and is well worth exploring. Feel free to write to us if you have a question or concern. We are looking forward to giving you an accurate answer. Why am I so bloated? Can it be related to my diabetes? Over 10 million people in the U.S. complain about bloating and stomach issues, which may be corrected by a few simple changes. Bloating is “air in the intestines”, which has several causes – including over-indulging in fatty and salty foods. Let’s explore some other possible reasons. One of the most common oral medications prescribed for diabetes type 2 is Metformin, which targets the liver to produce less glucose. Metformin is cheap (free in Publix supermarkets which are located in Florida and the south), but can have the common side effects of bloating, stomach gas pains and diarrhea. Most physicians are fully aware of these problems and try to start on a low dose of medication which is gradually increased. This allows the body to acclimate without GI symptoms. If Metformin causes severe stomach issues, talk to your physician about Glumetza. Glumetza is a slow release variation given only once a day. Although it is more expensive, it may have fewer side effects. If you take Metformin, do not take it on an empty stomach. Either take a few bites of your meal prior to taking the pill or take it directly after eating your entire breakfast or dinner. The timing of the medication will reduce GI side effects. Research states that “berberine may have similar properties of Metformin without the GI side effects.” A small study published by the N.I.H. showed it did have a positive effect on lowering blood sugars and lipid levels. Berberine is a Chinese herb Continue reading >>

Gas In The Digestive Tract

Gas In The Digestive Tract

Gas is air in your digestive tract. Gas leaves your body through your mouth when you burp or through your anus when you pass gas. People may think that they burp or pass gas too often and that they have too much gas. However, having too much gas is rare. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Flatulence

Diabetes-related Causes Of Flatulence

Our information shows that 2causes of Flatulence are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 201total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Flatulence if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. The full list of all possible causes for Flatulence described in various sources is as follows: 3-month colic - the common flatulence in infants up to 3 months due to immature gut. The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Flatulence as a side effect. Drug interactions may be a possible cause of Flatulence . [See detailed list of 1drug interaction causes of Flatulence ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Flatulence: The following list of conditionshave ' Flatulence ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Flatulence or choose View All. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

What Is It? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease. It is characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is also called type 2 diabetes mellitus and adult-onset diabetes. That's because it used to start almost always in middle- and late-adulthood. However, more and more children and teens are developing this condition. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes, and is really a different disease. But it shares with type 1 diabetes high blood sugar levels, and the complications of high blood sugar. During digestion, food is broken down into basic components. Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars, primarily glucose. Glucose is a critically important source of energy for the body's cells. To provide energy to the cells, glucose needs to leave the blood and get inside the cells. Insulin traveling in the blood signals the cells to take up glucose. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The pancreas is an organ in the abdomen. When levels of glucose in the blood rise (for example, after a meal), the pancreas produces more insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body's cells resist the normal effect of insulin, which is to drive glucose in the blood into the inside of the cells. This condition is called insulin resistance. As a result, glucose starts to build up in the blood. In people with insulin resistance, the pancreas "sees" the blood glucose level rising. The pancreas responds by making extra insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar. Over time, the body's insulin resistance gets worse. In response the pancreas makes more and more insulin. Finally, the pancreas gets "exhausted". It cannot keep up with the demand for more and more insulin. It poops out. As a result, blood glucose levels start to rise. Type 2 diabetes ru Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Over time, diabetes can affect many parts of your body. One of those is the vagus nerve, which controls how quickly your stomach empties. When it's damaged, your digestion slows down and food stays in your body longer than it should. This is a condition called gastroparesis. It can make you feel queasy and vomit. It's also bad for your blood sugar levels. Although it's more common in people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 can also get it. Most people with gastroparesis have had diabetes for at least 10 years and also have other complications related to the disease. You may have: Heartburn or reflux (backup of stomach contents into the esophagus) Vomiting (in severe cases, this may happen daily) Feeling full quickly when eating Food that stays in your stomach too long can spoil and lead to the growth of bacteria. Undigested food can harden and form a lump called a bezoar. It can block your stomach and keep what you eat from moving into the small intestine. Gastroparesis can make it hard to control diabetes. When food finally does leave your stomach and enters the small intestine, your blood sugar goes up, too. Throwing up can also leave you dehydrated. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms. He’ll also do a physical exam, and he may check your blood sugar. He might also suggest other tests. Barium X-ray: You drink a liquid (barium), which coats your esophagus, stomach, and small intestine and shows up on X-rays. This test is also known as an upper GI (gastrointestinal) series or a barium swallow. Barium beefsteak meal: You eat a meal with barium in it, and the doctor uses an X-ray to watch how long it takes you to digest the food. That tells your doctor how quickly your stomach empties. Radioisotope gastric-emptying scan: You eat food that has a radioactive Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Does Diabetes Make Me Fart?

Ask D'mine: Does Diabetes Make Me Fart?

Happy Saturday! Welcome to Ask D'Mine, our weekly advice column hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical diabetes educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil holds his nose while reflecting on... gas. Yep, those pungent bubbles that weave through your intestines and release with a surprising burst. Of course, Wil offers some insight on whether the whole diabetes card factors in. Read on, Friends.... you may be surprised what you hear. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Martha, type 2 from Texas, writes: I almost died of embarrassment when my little daughter asked me, “Momma, is it your diabetes that makes you fart so much?” I have been having a lot of gas since I was diagnosed. Could this be caused by my diabetes? [email protected] D’Mine answers: Gotta love kids. They really cut right to it, don’t they? Luckily for you, when you enter Ask D’Mine you’re in an embarrassment-free zone where nothing is off-limits. So let's talk about farts and farting. What is a fart? Medically referred to as flatulence (the white coat crowd can’t maintain any sense of dignity using the vernacular) a fart is nothing more than a combination of digestive gasses and air swallowed while eating, that finds its way back out of the human body through the anus. Simple enough, except for the fact that the process is often anything but silent and is frequently accompanied by a smell, officially called feculent, that no normal person enjoys. Speaking of normal people, according to the Mayo Clinic, normal people have wind, break wind, toot, have or pass gas, suffer the vapors, cut the cheese, or let it rip several times per day. And you thought fartology would be a stinker of a class to take in college. The extensive Wikipedia entry on the subject quotes research Continue reading >>

Coping With The Side Effects Of Metformin

Coping With The Side Effects Of Metformin

Metformin is prescribed for some people with diabetes to help keep their blood sugar levels under control. Metformin works by encouraging the body to burn energy, leading to lower blood glucose levels. If you take metformin it is usually more effective at lowering blood glucose levels than if you are just careful about what you eat. Nausea Metformin has a number of side effects, the most common of which are gastrointestinal. More than one in 10 people who take metformin experience side effects including nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach pain, increased flatulence or loss of appetite. More than one in 100 patients who take the medication experience changes to their sense of taste - usually a metallic taste. A number of other very rare symptoms have also been reported. Fewer than one in 10,000 people who take metformin may experience: What to do about side effects All medications take some getting used to. The NHS advises that patients can avoid the more common gastrointestinal side effects by taking the medication during or after a meal. In order to guard against vitamin B12 deficiency - which in rare cases becomes apparent in patients who have taken the medication for a long time - the charity Diabetes UK recommends eating a healthy, balanced diet including foods rich in vitamin B12 such as meat, dairy products and eggs. However, it is not recommended for those prescribed metformin to also take vitamin B12 supplements unless advised to by their doctor. Patients who feel unwell or who are concerned about a side effect should talk to their GP, pharmacist or practice nurse. Immediate medical attention should be sought in cases of breathing difficulties, muscle cramps, stomach pain, weakness or hypothermia, which can be symptoms of lactic acidosis. Continue reading >>

Saying Bye-bye To Bloating

Saying Bye-bye To Bloating

If you’re like many people, you’ve probably experienced the dreaded “belly bloat” at one time or another. Belly bloating is a result of excess air in your digestive tract. You know the feeling: Your stomach is puffed out and hard, your waistband is digging into you, and maybe you have those uncomfortable gas pains. You might also have symptoms of gas (flatulence), burping, or a rumbling stomach, as your body tries to get rid of excess air. Causes of belly bloating There are a lot of reasons for being bloated. Certain medical conditions may be the cause. These include: • Irritable bowel syndrome • Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis) • Gastroparesis • Heartburn • Fluid retention due to cancer, liver disease, or kidney failure • Celiac disease • Pancreatic insufficiency • Perforation of the digestive tract • Food intolerance • Parasite infection • Certain medications • Stress or anxiety Some of these causes are, of course, very serious and require medical attention. On the other hand, belly bloating (as bothersome as it is) may be due to overindulging (think second or third helpings of Thanksgiving dinner, for example). And, in many instances, belly bloating is caused by consuming certain foods and beverages. Let’s take a look at some of the common culprits. Sugar-free foods. Foods labeled as being “sugar-free” have a certain appeal to people who have diabetes, as well as to people who are cutting back on calories. Sugar-free foods, by definition, are foods or drinks that contain less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving. Artificial sweeteners (such as aspartame, sucralose, and stevia) and/or sugar alcohols (such as sorbitol, xylitol, and mannitol) are usually added to replace sugar and provide sweetness. Continue reading >>

How Diabetics Can Stop The Bloating And Gas Caused By Metformin

How Diabetics Can Stop The Bloating And Gas Caused By Metformin

If you have diabetes, you probably know all about the health challenges you face. It's not just about your blood sugar. You're also at higher risk of heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer's. What you don't need is for your diabetes drugs to cause even more health challenges. But new research says that's exactly what they're doing. In this new study, the researchers wanted to find out if diabetes drugs changed the patients' gut bacteria. They looked at 784 people. Some of them were healthy; some of them had type-2 diabetes. What was interesting about this study was what the researchers found out about metformin. Metformin is the most frequently used drug to treat high blood sugar. The first thing they found out was that the metformin caused favorable changes in the gut bacteria of type-2 diabetics. But it didn't stop there. Other studies have shown that metformin causes adverse effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Many people who take this drug suffer from bloating and increased flatulence. These are not comfortable problems. And they're also not signs of improved bacterial function. So what gives? How can metformin cause favorable changes in the bacteria, but still cause GI problems? Continued Below... They use a 5,000-year-old formula that works even when conventional remedies fail. Modern studies show it works! The study provided the researchers with a possible explanation. First, the changes the metformin made in the gut bacteria made the bugs better at sugar metabolism. So that's good. However, patients treated with metformin have more coliform bacteria in their intestines. While most medical professionals don't consider coliform bacteria dangerous, it can cause bloating and gas. So it's not completely benign. The reality is diabetics who take metformin have differ Continue reading >>

How Can You Overcome Gas From Metformin?

How Can You Overcome Gas From Metformin?

Sometimes even helpful medications have side effects that are difficult to tolerate. For example, metformin is a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. It even has benefits beyond blood sugar. In addition to diabetes, some studies suggest that metformin may be helpful against prostate, kidney and bladder cancer. But what can a patient do about the uncomfortable and embarrassing gas from metformin? Do You Get Gas from Metformin? Q. I take metformin to control blood sugar because I have type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, it produces an alarming amount of gas, bloating and bellyaches. Sometimes I have diarrhea and other times severe constipation. I am at my wits’ end. Do you have any remedies that might work? Remedies for Digestive Distress: A. People often attribute their flatulence to dietary factors, but many medications can also lead to unpleasant problems with gas. Metformin is one of these. We are sending you our Guide to Digestive Disorders in which we discuss remedies for flatulence, constipation and diarrhea. Many people report that taking fennel seed in tea or as seeds can help quiet gas. Moreover, probiotics like Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG can sometimes be beneficial in reducing troublesome flatulence (Pace, Pace & Quartarone, Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica, Dec. 2015). Herbs That May Ease Gas from Metformin: Ginger is a traditional treatment for a wide range of digestive maladies, including flatulence. Additionally, recent research shows that ginger may also help protect against digestive tract cancers (Prasad & Tyagi, Gastroenterology Research and Practice, online March 8, 2015). Finally, peppermint seems to limit flatulence and diarrhea as well as abdominal pain in people with irritable bowel syndrome (Prescrire International, June 2008). As a res Continue reading >>

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