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Diabetes And Fasting

Could Fasting Cure Diabetes? Evidence On Not Eating For Long Stretches Is Compellingand Controversial

Could Fasting Cure Diabetes? Evidence On Not Eating For Long Stretches Is Compellingand Controversial

Could Fasting Cure Diabetes? Evidence on Not Eating for Long Stretches Is Compellingand Controversial Slice of pound cake with lock and chain Tooga/Getty Health type 2 diabetes diabetes Fasting intermittent fasting Weight Loss Weight gain may be driven not only by what we eat but also by our tendency to eat all day long. In the past few years, intermittent fasting has emerged as a popular trend in weight loss. A growing number of health professionals are also prescribing fasting to people with type 2 diabetes, which currently afflicts more than 29 million people in the U.S. Yet a recent study warns that going for long stretches without eating could cause the very damage its supposed to prevent. Slice of pound cake with lock and chain Tooga/Getty Type 2 diabetes is triggered in part by unhealthy eating, which renders the body resistant to insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Without insulin, sugar from food cant enter our cells, leaving the blood with an excess amount of it. At first, the pancreas compensates by making more insulin, but eventually the demand wears out the digestive organ. Diabetics then become dependent on insulin injections to control their blood sugar. 50 Facts About the Human Body You Probably Didn't Know Dr. Jason Fung, a kidney specialist, is convinced that fasting undoes that cycle: Not eating reduces blood sugar. As he points out, fasting is simply extending what we already do at night when we sleep. Its supposed to be part of everyday life, says Fung, who co-founded the Toronto-based Intensive Dietary Management Program and wrote The Obesity Code and The Complete Guide to Fasting . Fasting can also send the body into ketosis, in which it burns fat rather than sugar. That helps with losing weight, which also helps slow diabetes. Several r Continue reading >>

5:2 Fasting Diet

5:2 Fasting Diet

Tweet The 5:2 intermittent fasting (IF) diet, more commonly referred to simply as the 5:2 diet, has become one of the more popular diet plan in recent years. Studies have shown that the diet helps with weight loss and may also reduce insulin resistance, both of which are of particular interest for many people with type 2 diabetes or borderline diabetes. One reason for the popularity of the diet is that it allows a certain amount of flexibility, in comparison to low calorie diets, on most days of the week. Theory behind the diet The idea of the diet is that short periods of fasting prompt the body to repair damage but not enter a starvation mode of conserving energy. Whilst the theory has yet to be conclusively proved, clinical studies have shown promising results for the diet, however it has only been examined over relatively short time spans, of less than a year. How the 5:2 diet works The 5:2 intermittent fasting diet is based on a simple idea. 5 days a week you stick to meeting the daily calorie intake advised for people of a healthy weight, that being: 2,500 kcal per day for men 2,000 kcal per day for women For the other 2 days each week, the diet stipulates that you have only around 25% of the values above, which is equal to: 600 kcal on these days for men 500 kcal on these days for women The fasting days can be taken at any time during the week as long as you do not take 2 fasting days consecutively. Benefits of the 5:2 diet Clinical studies have shown that the benefits of intermittent fasting are largely similar to those of a calorie restricted diets. The most commonly reported benefits among people from following the 5:2 diet: Research has shown that periods of fasting can help to improve life expectancy and decrease risks of diseases including nerve disorders, Continue reading >>

Why Fasting Is Such A Powerful Treatment Strategy For Diabetes

Why Fasting Is Such A Powerful Treatment Strategy For Diabetes

Why Fasting Is Such a Powerful Treatment Strategy for Diabetes An estimated 30.3 million Americans, nearly 1 in 10, have Type 2 diabetes. Another 84 million American adults about 1 in 3 are prediabetic, defined as an elevation in blood glucose over 100 mg/dl Any fasting blood sugar regularly over 90 mg/dl really suggests insulin resistance, and work by the late Dr. Joseph Kraft suggests 80 percent 8 out of 10 Americans are in fact insulin resistant Type 2 diabetes is curable, and the cure is less than inexpensive its free. You actually save money, as the remedy is to fast and not eat anything for a number of days on a regular basis Type 2 diabetes should not be treated with insulin, as insulin forces glucose into cells that are already saturated with excess glucose and cannot take in more. Instead, the glucose gets turned into fat, which is why insulin injections result in dramatic weight gain The answer for Type 2 diabetes is to stop feeding your body sugar and burn off the sugar already in your cells, and the most effective way to do this is fasting We have an epidemic of diabetes in the United States. An estimated 30.3 million Americans, nearly 1 in 10, have Type 2 diabetes. 1 Another 84 million American adults about 1 in 3 are prediabetic, and most are unaware of this fact. Prediabetes 2 is defined as an elevation in blood glucose over 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) but lower than 125 mg/dl, at which point it formally becomes Type 2 diabetes . However, any fasting blood sugar regularly over 90 mg/dl really suggests insulin resistance, and seminal work by the late Dr. Joseph Kraft, author of Diabetes Epidemic and You: Should Everyone Be Tested? suggests that 80 percent 8 out of 10 Americans are in fact insulin resistant, 3 which means theyre already on their w Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – Regular Meals Or Fasting?

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – Regular Meals Or Fasting?

Reversing Symptoms Via A Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan? One of the most notable principles of the American Diabetes Association protocols on How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, is that of “spacing meals evenly throughout the day and not skipping meals.” They promote the theory that spreading out foods, especially carbohydrate-containing foods, over three meals each day (and snacks if you want them) can help maintain steady blood sugar levels. The idea behind these protocols is to avoid a drop-off of blood glucose (hypoglycemia), however, given that this disease is a condition of a lack of blood sugar regulation, keeping the sugars in the diet elevated and regular, seems contrary to what needs to occur. While these guidelines make it easy for practitioners with patients on medication to more easily monitor dosages and timing, they also keep blood sugar relatively high and do little to cure the disease or combat the underlying cause – an inability of the body to adequately process sugars. Can We Regain Sugar Control Without Medication What If We Could Retrain Our Body to Take Back Control of Our Blood Sugar, Avoid The Highs And Lows Without Medication And Settle Back Into Balance? Is reversing type 2 diabetes without medication possible? Without a doubt, the key to balancing blood glucose is through lifestyle factors: the “Diabetic Diet Plan,” exercise, sleep, good nutrient levels and manageable levels of stress. Type 2 Diabetes is a lifestyle disorder and if we can let go of the unhealthy lifestyle habits that we have become accustomed to – bad dietary choices, sedentary habits, unimaginable levels of stress – and go on a “back to basics diet,” active lifestyle and a happy, positive disposition, we can reverse diabetes. While diet is key in reversing type-2 dia Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Fast When You Have Diabetes? Guidelines For Fasting With Diabetes

Is It Safe To Fast When You Have Diabetes? Guidelines For Fasting With Diabetes

Fasting when you have diabetes either Type 1 or Type 2 can be rather risky. However, it is not impossible if you are working in collaboration with your doctor and diabetes care team. The challenge behind fasting with diabetes is the skipping of meals. As someone with diabetes, you know the importance of managing your blood glucose levels and how much this relies on making sure you eat regular meals at the right time. So, what does skipping meals do to your blood glucose levels? Well get into this further in this article, but first lets discuss the different types of fasting. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. Below you will find a brief overview of the different types of fasting and both the pros and cons to each type: Intermittent fasting is the abstinence of food regularly such as once a week. This type of fasting can be done as part of a spiritual fast or as a conscience health decision for part of your typical diet. Most diets help you to achieve your goal of weight loss through the same type of equation. You consume less calories and food each day than you burn during periods of activity. The theory behind an intermittent fast for weight loss is that tit will help you to decrease your bodys overall appetite by slowing down your metabolism. An intermittent fast can be useful for some as they help you to establish a routine that fits in with your daily activities. Common types of intermittent fasting include fasting once daily for anywhere from 16-24 hours. There are three popular/ common methods used to fast intermittently. They include: Eat-Stop-And-Eat: Continue reading >>

Fasting Cures Type 2 Diabetes – T2d 4

Fasting Cures Type 2 Diabetes – T2d 4

While many consider Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) irreversible, fasting has also been long known to cure diabetes. In our previous post, we considered bariatric surgery. While extreme, these surgeries have proven the point that the metabolic abnormalities that underlie T2D (hyper insulinemia, insulin resistance) can often be fully reversed after a short (weeks) period of intensive treatment with bariatrics. Many early studies were done with the heavy-duty Roux-en-Y surgery, which is the heavyweight champions of surgeries. The best weight loss. The most complications. This is the surgery that has ‘Go Big or Go Home’ tattooed on its massive bicep. But even milder forms of bariatric surgery show the same reversibility of T2D. A gastric band is essentially a belt implanted around your stomach. They keep tightening the belt so that you can’t eat. If you try to eat too much, you’ll puke it all back up. Loverly. It ain’t pretty, but it sure do work. Again, long term results are kind of iffy, but short term results are pretty good. You can see the results of gastric banding versus medical treatment from the graph above. Patients randomized to the gastric band showed a significant and pretty damn good drop in their fasting blood sugars. In other words, T2D was reversing in a b-i-g way. Those given medicines alone didn’t do very well at all. Basically they stayed the same. They were no better than before. So, yes, even gastric banding these 500 pound patients with 20 years of diabesity can reverse within weeks even before the weight comes off. One of the main questions is why? There are many hypotheses – which we will consider in a later post, but it is the sudden severe restriction of all calories that causes this beneficial effect. This is the same thing as the time teste Continue reading >>

A Fasting Diet Could Reverse Diabetes And Repair The Pancreas, Says New Research

A Fasting Diet Could Reverse Diabetes And Repair The Pancreas, Says New Research

Researchers have been able to reverse symptoms of diabetes and restore pancreas functions in mice by putting them on a version of the fasting-mimicking diet. The diet tricks the body into a fasting mode for a few days a month, even while carefully selected foods are still being eaten, and it could be enough to reboot the organ's key functions and restore insulin production, scientists say. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot make insulin (type I) or is damaged by insulin resistance (type II), and the team from the University of Southern California says the diet reversed symptoms of both types of diabetes in mice. "By pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back... the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming," says the head of the research team, Valter Longo. In humans, the fasting-mimicking diet has been credited with helping people lose weight more effectively, and previous studies have also linked it to reducing risk factors for diseases like heart disease and cancer. The diet has also been credited with reducing the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis, so it's earning quite a reputation amongst scientists. In each case starving the body seems to reset the production of healthy cells. In the latest study, mice were put into the artificial fasting mode for four days a week over a period of several months. Scientists found this was enough to regenerate beta cells in the pancreas, responsible for storing and releasing insulin. Damaged cells were replaced by working ones. The team also experimented on pancreatic cell cultures from human donors with type I diabetes. Here too, simulated fasting produced more insulin and more of the Ngn3 protein required for normal pancreatic function. In other words, the sign Continue reading >>

Fasting Diets May Raise Risk Of Diabetes, Researchers Warn

Fasting Diets May Raise Risk Of Diabetes, Researchers Warn

Fasting diets may raise risk of diabetes, researchers warn New study also suggests regimes that include intermittent fasting may cause other long-term health problems Last modified on Mon 21 May 2018 11.00EDT Popular fasting diets involve going without food for two days a week, or every other day.Photograph: Ian Hooton/Getty Fasting every other day to lose weight could have damaging side effects. That is the conclusion of a group of scientists speaking this weekend at the European Society of Endocrinologys annual meeting. Their findings suggest that fasting-based diets may impair the action of sugar-regulating hormone insulin, and lead to increased risk of diabetes. Care should be taken before starting such programmes, say researchers. Ana Bonassa, whose team from the University of So Paulo in Brazil carried out the study, said: This is the first study to show that, despite weight loss, intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and affect insulin function in normal healthy individuals, which could lead to diabetes and serious health issues. In recent years intermittent fasting diets have gained popularity . Participants fast for two days out of seven, or on alternate days. However, evidence of their success has been contradictory and there is debate among doctors about their potential to trigger harmful long-term effects. Previous research has also shown that short-term fasting can produce molecules called free radicals, highly reactive chemicals that can cause damage to cells in the body and which may be associated with impaired organ function, cancer risk and accelerated ageing. The So Paulo researchers examined the effects of fasting every other day on the bodyweight, free radical levels and insulin function of normal adult rats over three months. Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Pancreas'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Pancreas'

Fasting diet 'regenerates diabetic pancreas' By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News website These are external links and will open in a new window The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell , says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 i Continue reading >>

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Whether you are honoring an ancient religious practice or heading to the lab for a fasting blood test, care is needed when missing meals with diabetes. Fasting can throw off the delicate balance of food, water, and blood glucose levels in potentially harmful ways. Fasting with diabetes poses significant risks, says Kathaleen Briggs Early, PhD, RD, CDE, of the Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences. Most of the research on fasting and diabetes surrounds Ramadan, the annual Islamic observance that requires fasting from sunrise to sundown for 29 or 30 days. A commentary published in 2010 in Diabetes Care developed in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) focused on fasting during Ramadan, though many of the issues it raises are relevant to other types of fasting as well. It says that “most often, the medical recommendation will be not to undertake fasting” if you have diabetes. The paper acknowledges that fasting for spiritual reasons is a personal decision, but one that should include the guidance of a health care provider. A study found that 43 percent of people with type 1 diabetes and 79 percent of people with type 2 diabetes from 13 Islamic countries fast during Ramadan. With that reality, fasting safely becomes a priority for people with diabetes and their care providers. “Anybody with diabetes needs to first talk to their doctor about going on a fast,” says Early, and some experts recommend a pre-fasting medical assessment to help ensure safety. If you are considering fasting, talk to your health care provider about a plan that takes medication, nutrition, and hydration into account. Regularly monitoring blood glucose during fasting is key to avoiding health emergencies. Not eating when taking insulin or certain other diabetes Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

How Fasting Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

How Fasting Reverses Type 2 Diabetes

While many consider type 2 diabetes (T2D) irreversible, fasting has been long known to cure diabetes. In our previous post, we considered bariatric surgery. While extreme, these surgeries have proven the point that the metabolic abnormalities that underlie T2D (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance) can be fully reversible even after a few short weeks. Many early studies were done with the heavy-duty Roux-en-Y surgery, which is the heavyweight champions of surgeries. The best weight loss. The most complications. This is the surgery that has ‘Go Big or Go Home’ tattooed on its massive bicep. But even milder forms of bariatric surgery show the same reversibility of T2D. A gastric band is essentially a belt implanted around your stomach. The surgeon keeps tightening the belt so that you can’t eat. If you try to eat too much, you’ll puke it all back up. Lovely. It ain’t pretty, but it sure does work. Again, long term results are kind of iffy, but short term results are pretty good. The results of gastric banding versus medical treatment showed a significant and pretty damn good drop in their fasting blood sugars. In other words, their T2D was reversing in a b-i-g way. Those given medicines alone basically stayed the same. They were no better than before. Gastric banding a 500 pound patient will still reverse 20 years of diabesity within weeks. One of the main questions is why? There are many hypotheses, but essentially, it is the sudden severe restriction of all calories that causes this beneficial effect. This is the same thing as the time tested, ancient healing tradition of fasting. Fasting is the voluntary restriction of food for religious, health or other purposes (eg. hunger strikes). Is bariatrics simply a surgically enforced fast? The short answer is yes. I Continue reading >>

Fasting Safely With Diabetes

Fasting Safely With Diabetes

Fasting can be a challenge for anyone, but it can be especially difficult for someone with diabetes. As any diabetic knows, successful blood sugar management relies on healthy meals eaten at regularly spaced intervals. So what happens when one or more meals need to be skipped for religious reasons or because of a medical or dental procedure? Each individual's situation is different, so consultation with your physician is crucial. That said, there are some general guidelines that can help when it comes to fasting with diabetes. Diabetes and Fasting: Does Type Matter? Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, fasting needs to be approached with care. "Fasting should be rare if you have diabetes because an individual with type 1 or type 2 on oral medication can experience hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)," says Amy Kranick, a certified diabetes educator with Diabetes Care Club in Nashville, Tenn. Risks from low blood sugar include seizure, coma, or even death if left untreated. On the other hand, depending on the individual, fasting without using insulin can result in high blood sugars or in diabetic ketoacidosis (a serious diabetes complication caused by blood build-up of acids called ketones). Dehydration is another fear if fluids are avoided during the fast. Diabetes and Fasting: Does the Reason Make a Difference? That being said, people with diabetes may want or need to fast for a variety of reasons, and the length of the fast can affect what actions you need to take. Here are some examples: Religious reasons. Some people with diabetes may want to fast for religious observances such as Yom Kippur or Ramadan. Given the risky nature of fasting with diabetes, this isn't necessarily a good idea. "Both [Judaism and Islam] have guidelines that exempt those people who will be Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But don’t be fooled: it’s much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting – with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time – have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet. The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were wowed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health. The reasons for these improvements aren’t yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones – molecules created in the liver from recycled fat – appear to be beneficial. ‘Fasting’ without fasting The problem is that constant calorie restriction isn’t practical: it’s easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, we’ve learned that constant calorie restriction isn’t really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits. There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as “time restricted feeding”, requires eating only during a few hours of the day – say between 10am and 6pm. This approach gives the body a long break from food each night, and also reinforces beneficial circadian rhythms. The other type of intermittent fasting – made popular by the 5:2 diet – is known as “periodic fasting”. This approach involves alternating be Continue reading >>

New Research Linking Intermittent Fasting To Increased Diabetes Risk Stirs Debate

New Research Linking Intermittent Fasting To Increased Diabetes Risk Stirs Debate

New research linking intermittent fasting to increased diabetes risk stirs debate How does new research suggesting intermittent fasting could increase a person's diabetes risk stack up with a growing body of science suggesting the exact opposite?(Credit: opolja/Depositphotos ) New research presented recently at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting is suggesting the intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and increase a person's risk for type 2 diabetes. The research stands in opposition to many studies in recent years that have pointed to the positive health effects of intermittent fasting and experts suggest this new data should be treated with caution. The new study, from a team at the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil, set out to investigate the effect of fasting on body weight, free radical levels and insulin function. For three months, healthy adult rats were subjected to intermittent fasting consisting of no food every other day. Although a decrease in overall body weight was recorded across the experiment period, an increase in abdominal fat tissue was identified. Most striking is the study's finding that after three months of this diet, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas displayed damage. Markers of insulin resistance were identified, as were increased levels of free radicals. "This is the first study to show that, despite weight loss, intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and affect insulin function in normal healthy individuals, which could lead to diabetes and serious health issues," says Ana Bonassa, one of the researchers on the project. The research was presented as part of a conference presentation, is currently unpublished and is not peer-reviewed, so caution is necessary when evaluating its Continue reading >>

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