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Diabetes And Exercise Handout

Diabetes Counseling Education Handouts

Diabetes Counseling Education Handouts

Many professionals that do not specialize in diabetes are unaware of how to communicate the complexity of type 2 diabetes. If you face that challenge and are looking for more ideas, consider purchasing Diabetes Counseling and Education Activities: Helping Clients without Harping on Weight. This book is a weight-neutral guide to explaining type 2 diabetes without harping on weight. The book covers 14 activities including: Embracing a Weight Neutral Approach to Diabetes Care This discussion is designed to help you understand why the Health at Every Size (HAES) movement is important for diabetes care. It continues to offer suggestions on how to avoid common counseling pitfalls and concludes with providing four points for bringing HAES into your MNT/DSMT program. The Insulin Knife: Part 1 This handout and teaching activity explains the complexity of type 2 diabetes without the confusion. If you have been looking for a way to talk about insulin production, insulin resistance, and diet without weight loss, then the Insulin Knife is a perfect activity to learn. The activity breaks type 2 diabetes into three questions, each answer building on the next to provide a whole view of diabetes care. The Insulin Knife: Part 2 A Deeper look into Insulin Resistance This activity builds on the Insulin Knife handout. After presenting the Insulin Knife, many clients have questions and want to explore one of the three aspects of this concept in greater detail. The Insulin Knife: Part 2 focuses on the different factors contributing to insulin resistance allowing you to unpack this concept with confidence. Thermostat: Understanding the Cause of Insulin Resistance This handout and teaching activity explains the role of environment and lifestyle changes and how blood sugar levels shift as a res Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Overview If you just found out you have diabetes, you probably have a lot of questions and you may feel a little uncertain. But you’re not alone. In the United States, 23.6 million people have diabetes. Most of these people lead full, healthy lives. One of the best things you can do for yourself is to learn all you can about diabetes. This article will tell you some of the basics about diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when a person’s body doesn’t make enough of the hormone insulin or can’t use insulin properly. There are 2 types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes occurs when your body’s pancreas doesn’t produce any insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas either doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body’s cells ignore the insulin. Between 90% and 95% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It is sometimes called juvenile diabetes because it is usually discovered in children and teenagers, but adults may also have it. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or the body’s cells ignore the insulin. Can children get type 2 diabetes? Yes. In the past, doctors thought that only adults were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, an increasing number of children in the United States are now being diagnosed with the disease. Doctors think this increase is mostly because more children are overweight or obese and are less physically active. What is pre-diabetes? Pre-diabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than they should be, but not so high that your doctor can say you have diabetes. Pre-diabetes is becoming more common in the United States. It grea Continue reading >>

Taking Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Taking Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org , the AAFP patient education website. Am Fam Physician.2004Apr15;69(8):1971-1972. What is type 2 diabetes? What is prediabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. High blood sugar can cause heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, and vision loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Before people get type 2 diabetes, they usually go through a prediabetic stage. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are the two kinds of prediabetes. In people with IGT and IFG, blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. People with prediabetes have a high risk of getting diabetes. They also are more likely to have a heart attack. How can my doctor tell if I have prediabetes or diabetes? Your doctor can use a blood test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes. Who is at risk for getting prediabetes and diabetes? You are at risk for getting prediabetes or diabetes if: You have a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes. You were diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy or had a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds at birth. You belong to any of the following ethnic groups: black, Native American, Latin American, or Asian/Pacific Islander. You have high blood pressure (above 140/90 mm Hg). Your high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level (good cholesterol) is less than 40 mg per dL (for men) or less than 50 mg per dl (for women), or your triglyceride level is higher than 250 mg per dL. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Table of Contents Click on any of the links below to access helpful materials on managing all aspects of diabetes that can be printed and given to your patients . Introductory Information 1. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., insulin) 2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., medications) 3. Women and Diabetes: Eating and weight, pregnancy, and heart disease 4. Men and Diabetes: Sexual Issues and employment concerns 5. Diabetes and Your Lifestyle: Exercise, traveling, employment, sexual issues, and special considerations for the elderly General Self-Care (e.g., Blood Glucose, Foot Care) Blood Glucose 6. Pass This Test: Testing blood glucose levels 7. Get off the Blood Glucose Rollercoaster: High/low blood sugar symptoms and treatment A. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Oral Meds): Patient log to record levels B. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Insulin Meds): Patient log to monitor levels Feet 8. Foot Care for People with Diabetes: Hygiene, inspection, and when to call your physician C. TOOL: Foot Care Log Patient log to record self-inspections and any problem areas D. TOOL: Injection Sites Patient log to help rotate injection sites Exercise E. TOOL: Planning Your Exercise: Guide to help patients design an exercise program F. TOOL: Physical Activity Log: Patient log to record physical activity 9. Exercise in Disguise Finding ways to exercise at home and outside of the gym 10. Exercising Like Your Life Depends on It: Health benefits to exercising 11. Hot Weather Exercise: Taking extra care when exercising in hot weather Nutrition/Health Diet/Weight Loss 12. Managing Type 2 Diabetes through Diet: Suggestions for balancing your diet 13. Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes: Weight loss be Continue reading >>

Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes

Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Center View PDF When you exercise or play outside, your muscles are working hard to help you move. Its important to manage your blood sugar before, during and after you exercise so your blood sugar stays within a normal range. This includes eating the right number of carbohydrates based on your blood sugar levels. In this handout, you will learn how to manage your blood sugar when you do different types of exercise. Why Do I Need to Manage My Blood Sugar When I Exercise or Play Outside? When you exercise or play outside, your muscles work hard to help you move. To do that, your muscles need fuel (energy) in the form of carbohydrates (carbs) from food. Eating the right number of carbs also helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range. When you exercise, your muscles release glucose (sugar). Your muscles also become more sensitive to insulin. This can happen during or after exercise. It can alsolast for up to 36 hours (about a day and a half). Your muscles also use glucose that is already in your body. Managing your blood sugar while you exercise helps your muscles use glucose better. What Should I Do to Manage My Blood Sugar Before I Exercise? You should keep track of the following things before you exercise: Your blood sugar levels before you exercise How hard your exercise will be (Scroll down to see the different types of exercise.) What Should I Eat or Drink Before and After I Exercise? You should drink lots of water before, during and after you exercise. You should also eat snacks that are high in carbs and protein. Below are some examples of snacks you can eat before and after you exercise. Carb counts can be different, depending on the brand. Read the nutrition labels before you exercise: Continue reading >>

Educational Materials For Your Patients

Educational Materials For Your Patients

Curated for the diabetes care partner, this set provides basic information about diabetes, clarifies the partner's role in caring for someone with the disease, and explains the importance of taking good care of themselves. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise: Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is a crucial part to monitoring your diabetes, as it can improve your blood sugar control and your overall fitness and health. However, diabetes can create some challenges when exercising, so it is important that one monitors their blood glucose levels before, during, and after exercising. It is also recommended that you get your doctor’s approval before jumping into a fitness routine. As you become more active, discuss possible activities with your doctor and talk about the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar. © 1998-2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical and. © 1998-2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. BEFORE Exercise: test your blood sugar 30 minutes prior to exercise and immediately before exercising. If your blood sugar is: • 100 mg/dL or lower ïƒ Your blood sugar is too low to exercise safely. Eat a small carbohydrate-containing snack, such as fruit or crackers, before you begin your workout. Remember the 15-15 rule. • 100 to 250 mg/dL ïƒ This is a safe pre-exercise blood sugar range. • 250 mg/dL or higher ïƒ Be cautious before exercising and test urine for ketones. o Excess ketones indicate that your body doesn't have enough insulin to control your blood sugar. Wait to exercise until your test kit indicates a low level of ketones in your urine. • 300 mg/dL or higher ïƒ Your blood sugar is too high to exercise safely. Wait to workout until your blood sugar drops to a safe pre-exercise range. Contact your doctor with repeated elevated readings. During Exercise: check your blood sugar every 30 minutes (especially if you are doing a longer workout and/or trying a new activity). STOP exercising if your blood sugar is: • 70 mg/dl or lower • You feel: shaky, nervous, or confu Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

NEW! Introducing 40 Educational Handouts on Using Insulin Low Literacy and Very Low Literacy Versions Available ACU and the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation announce the release of 40 educational handouts for patients who are starting insulin. Each handout is written in easy to understand language with simple illustrations. The handouts are available in both English and Spanish and two literacy levels: low literacy and very low literacy. The handouts are free to download and distribute. Using Insulin to Treat Your Diabetes: What It Means for You English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) About Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Insulin Syringes and Pens English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Injecting Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Needle Safety English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Managing Daily Doses of Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Measuring Your Blood Sugar English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Tracking Blood Sugar Results English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Diet and Exercise English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Travel Tips English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (P Continue reading >>

Diabetes Topics Catalogue

Diabetes Topics Catalogue

To search this Diabetes Topics Catalogue, hold "Ctrl" + "f" (PC) or "Cmd" + "f" (Mac) and type in your search word. Consider giving all your patients the short list of Diabetes Resources for Patients (diabetes phone-lines, classes, urgent help, routine 1:1 help). Patient Worksheet - Managing Your Blood Sugars (AHS) The following are some of the many tools available for determining the carbohydrate content of foods. Not all sources of carbohyrate content may be acccurate (particularly for apps). Labels: Subtract grams of fibre from the grams of carbohydrate for the portion on the label. Related "Matching Carbohydrate to Insulin" handout in Diabetes Type 1 heading below. Restaurant websites: Many fast food and other restaurants have nutrient analysis posted online for their products. Nutrient Analysis Apps: Through smart phones' app stores or AppCrawlr . General carbohydrate estimates. One carbohydrate choice contains 15 grams of carbohydrate (after the fibre is subtracted).A general guideline for the number of carbohydrate choices to eat per meal is 2-4 for most women and 4-6 for most men. For snacks: 0-1 for women and 0-2 carb choices for men. 1/2 cup (125 mL) cooked pasta/potato/other starch To access AHS Nutrition handouts see Nutrition Resources below. Other handouts available through a dietitian. Nutrient Analysis Websites (we cannot verify accuracy of data): Encourage patients to contact their Primary Care Network (PCN) regarding classes. PCN information can be accessed through mypcn.ca Client Centered Counseling (Motivational Interviewing) Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Dexcom Trend Arrows: Preventing high and low glucose readings by adjusting See Diabetes Services Calgary page for referral documents Nutrition handouts for diabetes in pregnancy see Nutrition Continue reading >>

Exercise Guidelines

Exercise Guidelines

Find exercise guidelines for your type: In this section, you will find: Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Moveforwardpt.com

Diabetes - Moveforwardpt.com

Diabetes is diagnosed by a physician, based on a test of your blood glucose level. This test is often ordered by a physician when a person reports some of the signs and symptoms listed in the previous section, or has risk factors determined by a physician. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, a physical therapist can evaluate your symptoms and problems associated with the condition. A physical therapist will identify physical problems that can be helped with an individualized exercise program, and provide specialized treatments based on your needs and goals. Physical therapists help people with diabetes participate in safe, effective exercise programs to improve their ability to move, perform daily activities, reduce their pain, and possibly lower their blood glucose levels. Physical therapy treatments also can help people with diabetes heal any associated skin problems faster than they would without treatment. Your physical therapist will examine your record of blood glucose levels, and will check your skin for wounds. Your physical therapist will conduct a complete assessment of your strength, flexibility, endurance, and balance, and use the results of the testing to design an individualized treatment program that addresses your problems and needs. Your treatment program can help improve your: Motion. Your physical therapist will choose specific activities and treatments to help restore normal movement. These might begin with passive motions that the physical therapist performs for you to gently move your joints, and progress to active exercises and stretches that you do yourself. Strength. Your physical therapist will choose and teach you the correct exercises and equipment to use to steadily and safely restore your strength. Flexibility. Your physical therapist will Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Decreasing Risk For Gestational Diabetes Toolkit

Decreasing Risk For Gestational Diabetes Toolkit

"Are you at risk for developing Gestational diabetes?" poster ( English and Spanish ) Risk Assessment Chart assists the WIC nutritionist in becoming familiar with GDM risk factors. GDM Assessment Card ( English and Spanish ) explains the risk factors for developing GDM and an action plan for decreasing some of these risks. This card is used at the client's initial visit and given to the client as a handout. Choose MyPlate demonstrates a balanced meal with smaller portion sizes and emphasizing high fiber Walk to Success ( English and Spanish ) handout provides general guidelines for exercise during pregnancy. Hemoglobin A1c in Pregnancy ( English and Spanish ) handout defines what a Hemoglobin A1 is and how an elevated HbA1c may relate to complications during pregnancy. Referral Letter to Provider is given to the client with an HbA1c 5.7% "It's never too early to prevent diabetes" Postpartum Handout ( English and Spanish ) - For all pregnant clients regardless of risk level for developing GDM - Handout: How Can I Decrease my risk for Gestational Diabetes ( English and Spanish ) - Handout: Walk to Success ( English and Spanish ) - Handout: The Plate Method ( English and Spanish ) Continue reading >>

Exercise Resources - Diabetes Education Services

Exercise Resources - Diabetes Education Services

Physical Activity Guidelines 2016 Position Statement from the American Diabetes Association Resistance Training with Free Weights Patient Handout Excellent resource that uses images and words to describe how to use free weights and exercise all major muscle groups. A publication of the Canadian Diabetes Association. Resistance Training Using Bands Patient Handout Demonstrates through pictures and descriptions how to work all major muscle groups using bands and resistance training. Published by the Canadian Diabetes Association. Diabetes Video of Flash Mob to Beat It by Michael Jackson . Get Ready for World Diabetes Day, Nov 14. Its easy and fun! Teach your colleagues, get your patients up and moving. Lets Beat Diabetes together Step-by-Step Instructions click here Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes American College of Sports Medicine /American Diabetes Association joint position statement on exercise and type 2 diabetes. Weight Watchers 10-minute time crunch training with resistance bands DVD (Weight Watchers store, Online) Sit and Be Fit Mary Ann Wilson, RN, demonstrates how to effectively exercise while sitting down through videos, You-tube an her TV show. Go 4 Life a NIH website that celebrates active aging through exercise. Darebee.com fitness-at-home website that contains training challenges at a more advanced level. Diabetes Breakthrough by Osama Hammy M.D., Ph.D. and Sheri Colberg Ph.D.(book) Local YMCA (resistance training classes: offered only in some locations) Continue reading >>

Patient Handouts For Type 2 Diabetes

Patient Handouts For Type 2 Diabetes

JANUVIA is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUVIA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUVIA. JANUVIA is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to sitagliptin, such as anaphylaxis or angioedema. There have been postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis, including fatal and nonfatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, in patients taking JANUVIA. After initiating JANUVIA, observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis. If pancreatitis is suspected, promptly discontinue JANUVIA and initiate appropriate management. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUVIA. An association between dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor treatment and heart failure has been observed in cardiovascular outcomes trials for two other members of the DPP-4 inhibitor class. These trials evaluated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Consider the risks and benefits of JANUVIA prior to initiating treatment in patients at risk for heart failure, such as those with a prior history of heart failure and a history of renal impairment, and observe these patients for signs and symptoms of heart failure during therapy. Advise patients of the characteristic symptoms of heart failure and to immediately report such symptoms. If heart failure develops, evaluate and manage Continue reading >>

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