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Diabetes And Cinnamon

What Can Cinnamon Do For You?

What Can Cinnamon Do For You?

This blog has been compensated by OmniChannel Health Media and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone. The change of season brings the wonderful smells and flavors of fall cooking, like cinnamon. But cinnamon is more than just a tasty addition to pies and oatmeal. Research has shown that cinnamon has many health benefits.[1] So what can cinnamon do for you? Cinnamon is believed to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which help reduce damage to our cells. People with type 2 diabetes may also benefit from cinnamon.[2] Cinnamon may help metabolize glucose and increase insulin sensitivity.[3] Cinnamon may also help reduce fasting blood glucose and increase the body’s uptake of glucose.[4] However, not all cinnamon is created equal. Most of the cinnamon in the grocery store is Cassia cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon has been used in many human clinical trials. While it is fine in small amounts for food, it contains a compound, called coumarin, that you shouldn’t consume in large amounts or on a regular basis. Ceylon cinnamon, which is a little more expensive, contains less coumarin, but is not well studied. CinSulin® is a water-extracted cinnamon ingredient with the undesirable coumarin removed and the remaining active compounds from the plant concentrated. For more information about CinSulin, available at your Costco warehouse and Costco.com, please visit cdiabetes.com/cinsulin If you are interested in adding a cinnamon supplement to your daily routine, be sure to talk to your health care provider to see if it is right for you. 3 Ways to Better Manage Your Blood Sugar Choose foods with more fiber. Dietary fiber has many health benefits, like keeping you feeling full and satisfied longer, and helping improve cholesterol. Fiber also helps avoid blood sugar s Continue reading >>

Mike Huckabee And The Diabetes Cure He Endorsed That 'no Health Agency Supports'

Mike Huckabee And The Diabetes Cure He Endorsed That 'no Health Agency Supports'

Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is distancing himself from the unusual ways he earned money before announcing his White House run May 5, but journalists aren’t letting the former Arkansas governor off the hook. Huckabee, who shed about 100 pounds after being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, filmed TV and radio infomercials advertising a program to "reverse" diabetes in February and March. Huckabee also lent his email list to carry ads about a looming food shortage and a cancer cure found in the Bible. CBS’ Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer tried to pin Huckabee down on his business dealings during a May 10 interview that followed a critical column about "Huckabee’s Hucksterism" by National Journal’s Ron Fournier. Huckabee got testy as he explained the program he endorsed is more about healthy eating than dietary supplements. A bit later, Schieffer moved on to Fournier during a pundit panel discussion for a response. "As you know, there was more to that, and I really like the way you kind of put him on his heels and he had to filibuster you," Fournier said. "He -- his endorsing -- the infomercials that are endorsing cures and treatments that no health agency supports. He's linking cancer to cures to the Bible verse." In other words, he said, not very presidential behavior. PunditFact wanted to dig into Fournier’s claim about Huckabee’s past. Did he shill for a shoddy diabetes "cure" that "no health agency supports"? ‘Diabetes Solution Kit’ Fournier’s column references a March New York Times story about Huckabee’s "highly unconventional income streams." In a since-deleted video (though you can see one on the Daily Mail), Huckabee encouraged viewers to buy the Diabetes Solution Kit made by the South Dakota company Barton Publishing. In t Continue reading >>

Top 3 Essential Oils For Diabetes (try Coriander Or Cinnamon)

Top 3 Essential Oils For Diabetes (try Coriander Or Cinnamon)

It is disheartening to see how diabetes has become one of the most common illnesses these days. With an estimated 10% population, and counting, diagnosed with the chronic condition, it is a clear sign that we must be doing something wrong. It is not only disturbingly widespread; it is also terminal. However, studies and pervasive research suggest that it can be managed, if not uprooted, with a change in diet and lifestyle. One of the most advocated methods to control and manage this disease is by using essential oils that can improve overall digestion and regulate body’s sensitivity to insulin. Essential oils have been around for thousands of years for a reason. They could treat anything from cuts and scrapes to anxiety disorders. However, nowadays, these oils are becoming a natural and affordable solution to expensive medicines. We have all heard about diabetes, know at least one person who is suffering from it, and still somehow manage to fall into the same bottomless pit. The best-known way to fight a problem is by acknowledging its presence. For starters, there are two types of Diabetes: – Type 1: This type is genetic. Once you are inflicted with Type 1, your body stops breaking down sugar and starches to convert it into glucose. Glucose is necessary for your body as it is an important source of energy. Your body also stops producing insulin, the hormone required by your body to transfer glucose from your bloodstream into your cells, creating a dependence on insulin shots. – Type 2: This is the most common form that prohibits your body from using insulin properly, developing a resistance to it. Initially, your pancreas works overtime, trying to create the insulin. However, after some time, it becomes difficult for it to make enough that is required by your bod Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Diabetes Benefits: How It Can Affect Blood Sugar Level?

Cinnamon Diabetes Benefits: How It Can Affect Blood Sugar Level?

Diabetes is a fast spreading disease and has become a sort of an epidemic across the world. It is very important to understand the meaning and causes of the same. Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production of insulin by the pancreas or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body that affects the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body. Hence, in the treatment of diabetes, it is extremely important that there is a regulated control on the blood glucose or sugar level. What makes diabetes worse is the fact that when a person is suffering from this condition, he or she is prone to developing other complications as well, which include heart and kidney-related diseases, diabetic eye, amputations, nerve damage, skin problems, etc. Experts are always looking for something natural which can treat this extremely complicated disease. One such treatment of diabetes is the use of the readily available spice, cinnamon. The spice is highly beneficial in effectively dealing with diabetes and the other related complications. Cinnamon and Diabetes Cinnamon, the spice that has long been used in our kitchen, has been associated with the treatment of diabetes, particularly that of diabetes mellitus. As per a few research, the spice is known to improve the blood sugar levels as well as improve insulin sensitivity. It is a spice derived from the barks of the cinnamon tree, and it found in areas covering South America, the Caribbean, and also Southeast Asia. In the following paragraphs, we get into the details and find out more about cinnamon for diabetes. Some Facts Related to Cinnamon In order to understand the effect of the popular Indian spice, cinnamon on diabetes, we first would want to know more about the spice itself in genera Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Stevia And Cinnamon

Treating Diabetes With Stevia And Cinnamon

Type II diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. It normally manifests gradually. In this case, the pancreas produces insulin but it is not properly utilized. Treatment may be based on medication, insulin or both. It doesn’t usually present specific symptoms, so it can go quite unnoticed. We should try and control this disease because, if otherwise, over time, eye, kidney and nerve lesions can occur, as well as heart disease, stroke and even the need to amputate a limb. In this article, you will find out about a natural method for treating diabetes with stevia and cinnamon. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The treatment The specialist will assess our case and will give us a treatment to follow. A strict diet is essential, and we can also significantly get better if we exercise regularly, control our weight and follow some natural tips. In this article we present the two best natural remedies: stevia and cinnamon. Stevia We have learned about Stevia rebaudiana in recent years, although it is native to Paraguay, where it has always been consumed. This plant has proven its excellent properties not only as a natural sweetener with no calories but because of its multiple properties, the first of which is that it regulates glucose levels. We can take three daily infusions or directly in extracts or tablets. It is essential that it’s pure extract with a dark color, and not a refined sweetener that has no properties because they were removed. Cinnamon Some studies have shown that cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) lowers glucose, cholesterol and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes, and even keeps them in a low level for a while after taking it. Accordin Continue reading >>

Buy Cinnamon Extract, Multi-vit Rx Or Diet Rx

Buy Cinnamon Extract, Multi-vit Rx Or Diet Rx

Cinnamon for diabetes, supplement herb for blood sugar, diabetes, dosage, benefit and side effects Ray Sahelian, M.D. Cinnamon is aromatic and one of the best tasting spices. In recent years scientists have discovered that cinnamon extract has strong antioxidant activity and has the potential to help maintain healthy blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Patients with diabetes may find cinnamon to be a healthful addition to their diet. Research studies with the use of cinnamon in blood sugar control have yielded conflicting results and it is not clear at this time whether taking a cinnamon supplement would reduce blood sugar levels with long term use. Cinnamon benefit review Cinnamon, at about 3 to 6 grams a day, seems to have a moderate effect in reducing fasting plasma glucose concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients with poor blood sugar control. Cinnamon supplement may not be very effective in lowering blood sugar in those with type 1 diabetes. However, by itself, it is not likely to have a major influence but could be combined with other natural medications for better blood sugar control. One of the oldest remedies used in traditional Chinese herbalism for digestive support, recent studies have shown cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum or Cinnamomum cassia) may support healthy blood sugar levels, when used as part of your diet, by activating insulin and glucose transport and improving glucose metabolism. Diet Rx with cinnamon for better weight management If you would like to eat less, consider a product called Diet Rx. This natural appetite suppressant works without stimulants. Diet Rx has no added caffeine, ephedra, ephedrine alkaloids, synephrine, hormones, guarana, ginseng, or stimulating amino acids. When you eat less, there is a better likelihood that your blood s Continue reading >>

Cinnamon’s Role In Diabetes Treatment

Cinnamon’s Role In Diabetes Treatment

In a new meta-analysis, patients with type 2 diabetes who took cinnamon displayed improved fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels, but showed no significant changes in HbA1c levels…. In the past, cinnamon’s glucose lowering effect has been studied in several randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but their results either lacked power due to the small sample sizes or results were just inconsistent. Allen et al, conducted a more recent meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials looking at cinnamon’s effect on patients with type 2 diabetes. The RCTs included in the analysis studied the effects cinnamon had on diabetic patients vs. those who did not have diabetes (control group). Lab values were then obtained to measure these effects and either included: glycated hemoglobin (A1c), fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or triglyceride levels. Weighted mean differences among these levels were then calculated between the treatment group and control group. Among the 10 RCTs included in the study, cinnamon doses ranged from 120 mg/d to 6 g/day for 4 to 18 weeks. It was found that the intake of cinnamon did decrease levels of fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-C, and triglyceride levels. It was also shown to increase levels of HDL-C, but it had no significant effect on A1c levels. In conclusion, cinnamon’s antiglycemic effect in diabetic patients shows its consumption to be beneficial. However, since this meta-analysis does not focus on a standard dose of cinnamon to take among patients with diabetes, its clinical use is still limited. Allen RW, et al. Cinnamon Use in Type 2 Diabetes: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2013; 11(5): 452-459. Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? The Consequences Of “natural Alternatives”

Cinnamon For Diabetes? The Consequences Of “natural Alternatives”

A customer strolled up to the counter one night when I was working in a retail pharmacy: “My doctor says I have prediabetes. I don’t want to take any drugs. Do you have something natural I can use to cut my blood sugar?” I looked at him in the eye, and pointed at his sizeable midsection. “Sir, if you’re at risk for diabetes, and you don’t want to take medication, the single best thing you can do for yourself is lose some weight.” He grinned and asked, “Great – what supplement can I take to help me?” This type of discussion occurs all the time. A patient has been assessed by their physician, and informed that they have a medical problem of some sort. The patient, reluctant to accept the physician’s evaluation, heads to the pharmacy for a second opinion. In some cases, the patient may question the physician’s advice: “All my physician wants to do is prescribe drugs.” Yet there’s a disconnect when it comes to strategies for management. More often than not, non-drug approaches are rejected out-of-hand (probably because the sample I speak with have already made the decision to buy something). And in those that are leery of medical management, there’s often a willingness to consider anything that’s available without a prescription – particularly if it’s perceived as “natural.” Natural products are gentle, safe, and effective, while medicine is thought of as unnatural, harsh, and potentially dangerous. This is the appeal to nature fallacy, nothing more. Purveyors of supplements leverage the appeal to nature fallacy into the marketing strategy of choice for almost all supplements and “alternative” medicines. And it leads to bad health care decisions. Alternative medicine for diabetes is big business, because the public health burden Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes Mellitus

Cinnamon For Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder. People with diabetes are known to be at greater risk of cardiovascular disease (including heart attack, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease such as acute or chronic ischaemia of a leg resulting in severe pain when walking short distances). There is also an increased risk of eye disease, kidney failure, nerve damage and sexual dysfunction when compared to the general population. Improvements in the regulation of blood sugar levels may help to reduce the risk of these complications. Cinnamon bark has been shown in a number of animal studies to improve blood sugar levels, though its effect in humans is not too clear. Hence, the review authors set out to determine the effect of oral cinnamon extract on blood sugar and other outcomes. The authors identified 10 randomised controlled trials, which involved 577 participants with diabetes mellitus. Cinnamon was administered in tablet or capsule form, at a mean dose of 2 g daily, for four to 16 weeks. Generally, studies were not well conducted and lacked in quality. The review authors found cinnamon to be no more effective than placebo, another active medication or no treatment in reducing glucose levels and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a long-term measurement of glucose control. None of the trials looked at health-related quality of life, morbidity, death from any cause or costs. Adverse reactions to cinnamon treatment were generally mild and infrequent. Further trials investigating long-term benefits and risks of the use of cinnamon for diabetes mellitus are required. Rigorous study design, quality reporting of study methods, and consideration of important outcomes such as health-related quality of life and diabetes complications, are key areas in need of attention Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar And Fights Diabetes

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar And Fights Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease characterized by abnormally high blood sugar. If poorly controlled, it can lead to complications like heart disease, kidney disease and nerve damage (1). Treatment often includes medications and insulin injections, but many people are also interested in foods that can help lower blood sugar. One such example is cinnamon, a commonly used spice that's added to sweet and savory dishes around the world. It provides many health benefits, including the ability to lower blood sugar and help manage diabetes. This article tells you everything you need to know about cinnamon and its effects on blood sugar control and diabetes. Cinnamon is an aromatic spice derived from the bark of several species of Cinnamomum trees. While you may associate cinnamon with rolls or breakfast cereals, it has actually been used for thousands of years in traditional medicine and food preservation. To obtain cinnamon, the inner bark of Cinnamomum trees must be removed. The bark then undergoes a drying process that causes it to curl up and yield cinnamon sticks, or quills, which can be further processed into powdered cinnamon. Several different varieties of cinnamon are sold in the US, and they are typically categorized by two different types: Ceylon: Also called "true cinnamon," it's the most expensive type. Cassia: Less expensive and found in most food products containing cinnamon. While both types are sold as cinnamon, there are important differences between the two, which will be discussed later in this article. Cinnamon is made from the dried bark of Cinnamomum trees and is generally categorized into two varieties. A quick glance at cinnamon's nutrition facts may not lead you to believe that it's a superfood (2). But while it doesn't contain a lot of vitamins or minerals, it d Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

If I say cinnamon, you say ... sugar? It's a popular combination, of course. But if you're interested in the health-promoting effects of cinnamon, you may want to think anew about the spice. For instance, says John Critchley, executive chef at Bourbon Steak Restaurant in Washington, D.C., why not add it to savory dishes? He uses cinnamon to create a spice and herb rub for lamb loin. He also whips up a great spinach salad with raisins, pine nuts and cinnamon. Critchley is a fan of the intense aromatics in cinnamon, especially in Saigon — a cousin of the cassia varieties of cinnamon most commonly used in the U.S. and Europe. And he says adding cinnamon to spice blends is a great way to layer flavors when you're cooking. And when you start to look at the potential health-promoting effects of the spice, there's even more incentive to experiment with it in the kitchen. Cinnamon comes from the bark of trees. It has long been considered a medicinal plant. There are several varieties, harvested from southern China to Southeast Asia. For years, there have been hints that adding cinnamon to your diet can help control blood sugar. And a recent spate of studies adds to the evidence that the effect is real. "Yes, it does work," says Paul Davis, a research nutritionist with the University of California, Davis. He authored a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medicinal Food that concluded that cinnamon lowers fasting blood glucose. "According to our results, it's a modest effect of about 3 to 5 percent," Davis says. This is about the level of reduction found in the older generation of diabetes drugs, he says. That makes the findings of interest not just to the 25 million Americans who already have diabetes, but also to the 80 million other people — nearly 1 in 4 of u Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Diabetes Recipes

Cinnamon Diabetes Recipes

Unfortunately because the US FDA heavily regulates anything that can be used like a medicine even a natural product like Cinnamon it will no longer allow us to display any material or cite any research studies however remote on the benefits of Cinnamon. While it's effects on diabetes is certainly debatable and certainly not proven beyond a shadow of doubt the FDA will not even allow us to even discuss it. This is an unfortunate tun of events but we must follow the law. But we do make the best Ceylon Cinnamon products in the World and hopefully you can get this valuable information from other sites. Admittedly they will not be as as comprehensive as ours but this is how Big Pharma controls your health. We can however give you some great diabetes friendly recipes with Cinnamon. Adding Ceylon Cinnamon adds flavor and flair to most recipes. Here are some of our diabetes friendly Cinnamon recipes. That means with little or no carbs. KETO DIET FOR DIABETES By far the best method to treat your diabetes is the Keto diet. Developed as a post cancer treatment, the Keto diet has been discovered as one of the best possible treatment options for diabetes. Because sugar and weight gain are all inter related. This is by no means the only solution but it is one of the best of many treatment options. Eating healthy. The Keto diet which involves a diet composed of 70% fat, 20% protein and 5% carbs. But remember in order to lose weight your sugar levels have to be zero. Here are some excellent videos you must watch The Myth about Blood Sugar and Diabetes How to burn the most Fat Home Cart Contact US Terms & Shipping Disclaimer Search Research Benefits Blog Client Login Tea Powder Sticks Leaf Oil Bark Oil Face Mask Toothipicks Candles Gifts & Other Continue reading >>

Half A Teaspoon Of This Each Day Can Optimize Cholesterol Levels...

Half A Teaspoon Of This Each Day Can Optimize Cholesterol Levels...

A 12-week London study was recently conducted involving 58 type 2 diabetics with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels over 7 percent. Hemoglobin A1c is a marker for long-term glycemic control in diabetics. After 12 weeks on 2g of cinnamon per day, study subjects had significantly lower HbA1c levels, as well as significantly reduced blood pressures (systolic, SBP and diastolic, DBP). The researchers’ conclusion: “Intake of 2g of cinnamon for 12 weeks significantly reduces the HbA1c, SBP and DBP among poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Cinnamon supplementation could be considered as an additional dietary supplement option to regulate blood glucose and blood pressure levels along with conventional medications to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.” In related news, a new study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill points to a connection between magnesium in the diet and lowered risk of diabetes. According to Reuters: “It's plausible that magnesium could influence diabetes risk because the mineral is needed for the proper functioning of several enzymes that help the body process glucose.” Researchers studied magnesium intake and diabetes risk in about 4,500 men and women aged 18 to 30. None of the participants were diabetic at the start of the study. Over the ensuing 20 years, 330 of the test subjects developed diabetes. The people with the highest magnesium intake – about 200 milligrams for every 1,000 calories consumed – were almost 50 percent less likely to develop diabetes than men and women who consumed about 100 milligrams per 1,000 calories. The study also revealed that as magnesium intake increased, inflammation levels decreased, as did insulin resistance. IMPORTANT NOTE: Reuters reports one wildly inaccurate conclusion: that consuming w Continue reading >>

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