diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Cinnamon

Spicy Solution? Cinnamon May Help Diabetes Patients

Spicy Solution? Cinnamon May Help Diabetes Patients

MORE Cinnamon might improve not only the taste of apple pie and oatmeal but also the health of people with diabetes, a new review study suggests. Researchers found that people with type 2 diabetes who took cinnamon supplements had lower fasting plasma glucose levels compared with people who didn't take cinnamon. The review also found that cinnamon benefited several important measures of heart health: It reduced total cholesterol, LDL "bad" cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and increased HDL "good" cholesterol. In the review, researchers looked at data collected from 10 randomized control led trials involving 543 patients with type 2 diabetes. These studies compared people who took cinnamon in a pill form, in doses ranging from 120 milligrams to 6 grams a day, for a period of four to 18 weeks, to people who did not take cinnamon. The most popular form of the supplement, which was used in six out of 10 trials, was Cinnamomum cassia, which participants were advised to take before, during or after their meals. [9 Healthy Habits You Can Do in 1 Minute (Or Less)] "When we combined the results of all the trials, we found that in patients with type 2 diabetes, there was a benefit on blood glucose and cholesterol levels," said study researcher Olivia Phung, an assistant professor of pharmacy practice at Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, Calif. The study is published online today (Sept. 9) in the journal The Annals of Family Medicine. Better glucose control Previous studies of cinnamon's effect on blood sugar have shown mixed results. In fact, when these same researchers published a review study of the supplement in 2008, they found it had no effect on blood sugar or cholesterol levels. But in their latest analysis, they included data from the most recent trials Continue reading >>

What Can Cinnamon Do For You?

What Can Cinnamon Do For You?

This blog has been compensated by OmniChannel Health Media and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone. The change of season brings the wonderful smells and flavors of fall cooking, like cinnamon. But cinnamon is more than just a tasty addition to pies and oatmeal. Research has shown that cinnamon has many health benefits.[1] So what can cinnamon do for you? Cinnamon is believed to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which help reduce damage to our cells. People with type 2 diabetes may also benefit from cinnamon.[2] Cinnamon may help metabolize glucose and increase insulin sensitivity.[3] Cinnamon may also help reduce fasting blood glucose and increase the body’s uptake of glucose.[4] However, not all cinnamon is created equal. Most of the cinnamon in the grocery store is Cassia cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon has been used in many human clinical trials. While it is fine in small amounts for food, it contains a compound, called coumarin, that you shouldn’t consume in large amounts or on a regular basis. Ceylon cinnamon, which is a little more expensive, contains less coumarin, but is not well studied. CinSulin® is a water-extracted cinnamon ingredient with the undesirable coumarin removed and the remaining active compounds from the plant concentrated. For more information about CinSulin, available at your Costco warehouse and Costco.com, please visit cdiabetes.com/cinsulin If you are interested in adding a cinnamon supplement to your daily routine, be sure to talk to your health care provider to see if it is right for you. 3 Ways to Better Manage Your Blood Sugar Choose foods with more fiber. Dietary fiber has many health benefits, like keeping you feeling full and satisfied longer, and helping improve cholesterol. Fiber also helps avoid blood sugar s Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes: Does It Really Help?

Cinnamon For Diabetes: Does It Really Help?

Over the past couple of days, we’ve been discussing several diabetes-related topics but what about one of the most important ones, especially when it comes to keeping us type 1 diabetics alive. No I’m not talking about okra, some exotic fruit, cinnamon, or essential oil; I’m talking about insulin! For those of you who make these claims (especially about okra and cinnamon) in regards to treating or as many of you like to say “cure” type 1 diabetes, you really need to stop. Over the past year I’ve been getting bombarded with sales pitches and I’m honestly tired of it. Cinnamon is a great antioxidant and comes with some fantastic health benefits but when it comes to type 1 diabetes, don’t you think if it was that easy, it would be mainstream information and the millions of us that battle with this disease day in and day out would avoid the BS that we deal with daily? Or perhaps the miracle lies within the specially formulated product you are trying to sell me? It’s utterly ridiculous, and the fact that you know nothing about the disease itself or how it works, you need to take a step back and take your products with you. I mean, you realize that you produce insulin naturally, it’s a normal human bodily function. What makes you think that okra, cinnamon, or your essential oil is going to magically wake up my dead beta cells (these are the cells that actually produce insulin, feel free to google, it’s a fascinating read). Perhaps your cinnamon, shake or oil defies all science and type 1 diabetes research? Or perhaps you have magic okra that you purchased from the same person who sold Jack his beanstalk beans? Perhaps the laws of physics cease to exist in your potent concoction? Either way you need to stop before you seriously put someone in a very bad p Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? The Consequences Of “natural Alternatives”

Cinnamon For Diabetes? The Consequences Of “natural Alternatives”

A customer strolled up to the counter one night when I was working in a retail pharmacy: “My doctor says I have prediabetes. I don’t want to take any drugs. Do you have something natural I can use to cut my blood sugar?” I looked at him in the eye, and pointed at his sizeable midsection. “Sir, if you’re at risk for diabetes, and you don’t want to take medication, the single best thing you can do for yourself is lose some weight.” He grinned and asked, “Great – what supplement can I take to help me?” This type of discussion occurs all the time. A patient has been assessed by their physician, and informed that they have a medical problem of some sort. The patient, reluctant to accept the physician’s evaluation, heads to the pharmacy for a second opinion. In some cases, the patient may question the physician’s advice: “All my physician wants to do is prescribe drugs.” Yet there’s a disconnect when it comes to strategies for management. More often than not, non-drug approaches are rejected out-of-hand (probably because the sample I speak with have already made the decision to buy something). And in those that are leery of medical management, there’s often a willingness to consider anything that’s available without a prescription – particularly if it’s perceived as “natural.” Natural products are gentle, safe, and effective, while medicine is thought of as unnatural, harsh, and potentially dangerous. This is the appeal to nature fallacy, nothing more. Purveyors of supplements leverage the appeal to nature fallacy into the marketing strategy of choice for almost all supplements and “alternative” medicines. And it leads to bad health care decisions. Alternative medicine for diabetes is big business, because the public health burden Continue reading >>

Help Control Type 2 Diabetes With Cinnamon

Help Control Type 2 Diabetes With Cinnamon

Cinnamon, along with many other herbs, spices, and medications, is recommended to help improve type 2 diabetes. We are all individuals, and our bodies respond differently to the applications of meds, herbs, and foods, so, overall, treatments are a trial and error for what can improve our health. What works for you may not work for me. Cinnamon is not an alternative to medications, but it does help in the control factors that all people with diabetes face. The American Diabetes Association has conducted studies and concluded that after “40 days, all three levels of cinnamon reduced the mean fasting serum glucose (18–29%), triglyceride (23–30%), LDL cholesterol (7–27%), and total cholesterol (12–26%) levels; no significant changes were noted in the placebo groups. Changes in HDL cholesterol were not significant.” So, does any cinnamon work? There are two main types of cinnamon available to the general public. They are Cassia and Ceylon. Cassia cinnamon contains higher levels of coumarin, which can cause toxicity in your liver but is reversible. A better alternative is a variety called Ceylon, a little more expensive, but if you are concerned with glucose levels, then this is the better choice. A full teaspoon or more of cinnamon a day is too much, whereas a gram, or about a half teaspoon, is the recommended amount per day. Sprinkle it on cereals, toast, add it to pancakes or waffles, or use it as a rub for lamb or pork. There are many different ways to incorporate cinnamon into your everyday diet. Even stick cinnamon used in hot teas is good. And, of course, there are always cinnamon capsules. Capsules are easiest to use, but not as delicious. Because cinnamon contains coumarin and can interact with several different medications, always let your doctor know th Continue reading >>

Cinnamon In Diabetes Mellitus

Cinnamon In Diabetes Mellitus

This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased. You do not have access to the full text of this article, the first page of the PDF of this article appears below. Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

People with diabetes often face dietary restrictions to control their blood sugar and prevent complications. Although research is in a preliminary stage, cinnamon may help fight some symptoms of diabetes. It is also unlikely to cause blood pressure spikes, or disrupt blood sugar. So, people with diabetes who miss a sweet pop of flavor may find that cinnamon is a good replacement for sugar. Can cinnamon affect blood sugar? Cinnamon has shown promise in the treatment of blood sugar, as well as some other diabetes symptoms. Research on the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar in diabetes is mixed and in the early stages. Most studies have been very small, so more research is necessary. People with diabetes who are interested in herbal remedies, however, may be surprised to learn that doctors are serious about the potential for cinnamon to address some diabetes symptoms. A 2003 study published in Diabetes Care, compared the effects of a daily intake of 1, 3, and 6 grams (g) of cinnamon with a group that received a placebo for 40 days. All three levels of cinnamon intake reduced blood sugar levels and cholesterol. The effects were seen even 20 days after participants were no longer taking cinnamon. A small 2016 study of 25 people, published in the Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, found that cinnamon may be beneficial for people with poorly controlled diabetes. Participants consumed 1 g of cinnamon for 12 weeks. The result was a reduction in fasting blood sugar levels. However, a 2013 study published in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine had a different result. The study, which used a more reliable method, had slightly more participants, at 70. The researchers found that 1 g of cinnamon per day for 30 days and 60 days offered no improvements in blo Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Blood Sugar: Implications For Diabetes

Cinnamon And Blood Sugar: Implications For Diabetes

For people with diabetes, abnormally high blood sugar is an extremely significant challenge. Unless well controlled, high blood sugar leads to many health complications, including kidney and nerve damage, problems with your bones and joints, teeth infections and heart disease (1). There are many medications to help combat high blood sugar – but they come with their own side effects. As a result, many people look for ways to lower blood sugar naturally, with the help of various foods and their diets. One ingredient that can help with this is the spice cinnamon. For that matter, you may have already heard about cinnamon and blood sugar. In this post, I will show you why the relationship is so important. What is Cinnamon? As you are probably aware, cinnamon is a common kitchen spice and already has a key place in modern diets. For example, it is often used with cinnamon rolls and is an especially prevalent flavor in the colder months. Cinnamon is also frequently used as part of healthy hot drinks, like turmeric golden milk and as an addition to coffee or tea. I’ve also seen it used in keto dessert recipes and in fat bombs – so it makes for a highly versatile spice. Cinnamon itself is actually the inner bark from a handful of trees in the Cinnamomum genus. The bark is dried and minimally processed before being sold in either stick or powder form. There are two main types of cinnamon to consider. The first is Cassia cinnamon, which comes from the species Cinnamomum cassia. This is the most common type of cinnamon and also the least expensive. The other type if Ceylon cinnamon. The species here is Cinnamomum vernum and the cinnamon itself tends to have a finer texture when crushed. Additionally, the stick of cinnamon contains many thin layers (like in the image), making Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Researchers have been investigating a number of powerful natural agents that can help you stabilize your blood sugar, and once again, cinnamon has proven itself as a viable contender in the fight against diabetes, as the study in Diabetic Medicine reveals.(1) One of cinnamon’s most impressive health benefits is its ability to improve blood glucose control. For example, just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day has previously been shown to significantly reduce blood sugar levels, triglycerides, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. (2) The more you can make use of natural therapies such as nutrition and exercise, the better your health will be. However, as helpful as supplements like cinnamon can be, they should not be misconstrued as cures. They are not substitutes for proper diet and lifestyle choices. You cannot properly address your diabetes if you still maintain a sedentary lifestyle and poor dietary choices — cinnamon supplementation or not! How Cinnamon Can Benefit Diabetics Below are five known ways cinnamon can be helpful to your metabolism: 1. Cinnamon can increase your glucose metabolism about 20-fold, which significantly improves blood sugar regulation. (4) 2. Cinnamon has been found to have “insulin-like effects” due to a bioactive compound, qualifying it as a candidate for an insulin substitute. 3. Cinnamon slows the emptying of your stomach to reduce sharp rises in blood sugar following meals, and improves the effectiveness, or sensitivity, of insulin. 4. Cinnamon actually enhances your antioxidant defenses. A study published in 2009 stated, “Polyphenols from cinnamon could be of special interest in people who are overweight with impaired fasting glucose since they might act as both insulin sensitizers a Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

Go to: The incidence of type II diabetes is increasing across the world. Dietary modifications help the patients to control blood glucose. Traditional herbs and spices are commonly used for control of glucose among which cinnamon (Ròu Guì; Cinnamomum cassia) has the greatest effect. Research has shown that adding cinnamon to diet can help to lower the glucose level. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cinnamon on the glucose level in blood. This was a Randomized clinical trial in which 70 Patients with type II diabetes were assigned randomly two groups (35 in cinnamon and 35 in placebo group). The groups were matched in terms of body mass index (BMI), HbAlc and fasting blood sugar (FBS). Patients were treated with cinnamon and the placebo group was treated with placebo in addition to their routine treatment for 60 days. FBG levels and glycosylated hemoglobin of patients on the first day, and 1 and 2 months after treatment were measured. Data were analyzed using t-test and paired t-test in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).16 software. The mean levels of FBS before, and 1 and 2 months after the intervention were 174 ± 59, 169 ± 43 and 177 ± 45; respectively. The levels of HbAlc before and after the intervention in the cinnamon group were (8.9 ± 1.7 and 8.9 ± 1.6). There was no significant difference in FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin levels between the two groups (P = 0.738 and P = 0.87, respectively). Results showed that using certain amount of cinnamon for 60 days did not change the glucose level of diabetic patients. So, using cinnamon to type II diabetes patients cannot be recommended and more studies are needed in future. Keywords: Cinnamon, Diabetes, Fasting blood sugar, Herbal medicine Go to: INTRODUCTION Prevalence of diab Continue reading >>

Herbs And Spices: Cinnamon's Link To Diabetes Control

Herbs And Spices: Cinnamon's Link To Diabetes Control

Today's Dietitian Vol. 17 No. 11 P. 12 Is this spice merely a folk remedy, or could it be a real help in diabetes management? Dietitians probably won't find the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommending cinnamon as part of its standard treatment guidelines for diabetes anytime soon, but cinnamon is viewed as an antidiabetes agent across much of the world.1 Many patients are interested in exploring cinnamon as a potential therapy. "About 10% to 20% of patients who come to our clinics either have tried cinnamon or are currently using it," says Brian Mowll, DC, CDE, a functional medicine practitioner at Sweet Life Diabetes Health Centers in the greater Philadelphia area. Similarly, an Australian survey of complementary and alternative medicine use among people with diabetes (primarily type 2) in Sydney found that 25% of respondents were using cinnamon to treat diabetes.2 The position of the ADA is that there's insufficient evidence to support the use of cinnamon in diabetes treatment, but there's research, including double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, suggesting a possible benefit.3-7 As a result, it's important for dietitians to stay abreast of what research and clinical experience shows so they can effectively counsel clients and patients. Science Behind Cinnamon Although some clinical trial results have been equivocal, several have shown benefits of cinnamon on glucose, lipid, and insulin levels.8-13 Studies also show cinnamon can potentiate insulin action and improve insulin resistance and glucose metabolism, although the detailed biochemical mechanisms aren't completely clear.14 Bioactive compounds in cinnamon affect several steps in insulin signaling pathways. For example, research has shown that certain water-soluble polyphenol compounds (type A polyphen Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Could Help Those With Diabetes: Study

Cinnamon Could Help Those With Diabetes: Study

The brown, mildly bitter and spicy cooking herb in your kitchen — cinnamon — is now found to have beneficial qualities for those with diabetes. This according to a recent research study published in an international journal by National Diabetes Obesity and Cholesterol Foundation (NDOC) and Fortis-CDOC Hospital. Dietary intervention In a randomised double-blind control clinical trial, the National Diabetes, Obesity & Cholesterol Foundation (N-DOC), Institute of Home Economics (University of Delhi) and Fortis CDOC Hospital for Diabetes and Allied Sciences investigated the effect of simple dietary intervention, that is, cinnamon among Indians who have much greater propensity to develop multiple metabolic problems leading to diabetes at an early age. In this study, cinnamon was tested in 58 people with metabolic syndrome (individuals having multiple metabolic abnormalities; abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low HDL, high blood sugar, and high blood pressure) and compared them with placebo (controls, number 58) over a period of 16 weeks. The study showed that dietary intervention with cinnamon can lead to multiple health benefits that are useful for prevention and management of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Indians who are markedly predisposed to develop these problems. “Importantly, besides decrease in various parameters including abdominal obesity which decrease heart attack risk, increase in HDL by about 2 mg/dl would lead to decrease in heart attack risk by 10%,” noted the study. Continue reading >>

How Does Cinnamon Help Control Diabetes?

How Does Cinnamon Help Control Diabetes?

What comes to your mind when you think of cinnamon? Well, logically speaking, nothing should. Unless otherwise you are obsessed with its link with diabetes (like me) and want to know more. Coming to the point, there are numerous studies that support cinnamon’s efficacy in treating diabetes. But there is another side to it. And in this post, we look at both the sides. Keep your questions ready about the use of cinnamon for diabetes prevention. Because the answers are coming! Cinnamon And Diabetes – The Link We already know what cinnamon is, don’t we? It is a sweet and pungent spice derived from wild cinnamon trees. Grown in tropical areas in Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and South America, cinnamon has been in use for thousands of years. What has been debatable for quite some time is its efficacy in treating diabetes. Is cinnamon good for diabetes treatment? Does it have any side effects? How should one use it? Oh yes, that’s where we are heading – to find the answers. Diabetes and Cinnamon – What Research Says There is a bunch of studies. One clinical study published in the 2003 edition of Diabetes Care journal supported the ability of cinnamon to improve the blood glucose and cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes patients (1). Cinnamon for diabetes type 2 – Another study published in 2000 in Agricultural Research Magazine stated that consuming just 1 gram of cinnamon a day can increase insulin sensitivity and even help reverse type 2 diabetes (2). Though more research is required in this area, a few other studies have indicated the usefulness of cinnamon as a diabetes treatment supplement. A review of several related studies conducted back in 2012 states that cinnamon has a beneficial effect on glycemic control – which means cinnamon, when taken in the Continue reading >>

More in diabetes