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Diabetes And Cinnamon

How To Use Cinnamon To Help With Diabetes

How To Use Cinnamon To Help With Diabetes

Reader Approved Three Methods:Incorporating Cinnamon Into Your DietAdding a Cinnamon Supplement to Your Treatment RegimenUnderstanding Why Cinnamon Helps with DiabetesCommunity Q&A Cinnamon is not only a spice packed with healthful antioxidants. It can also be used to help diabetics control their blood glucose levels. While it should not completely replace other treatments, consult your physician about adding to your treatment regimen. 1 Use cinnamon to replace sugar. Because cinnamon is so flavorful, it can often replace small amounts of sugar in stove-top recipes, sauces, meat, and vegetable dishes. Replacing a sweetener with this spice can help reduce the amount of sugar you consume and improve your blood glucose levels. Cinnamon is considered safe when used in the amounts normally found as foods-- this works out to roughly ½ to 1 teaspoon or about 1000 mg per day. 2 Add cinnamon to your breakfast. For instance, stir cinnamon and a small amount of agave nectar into oatmeal in the morning, adding berries and nuts to make it an even more nutritious breakfast. Or top off buttered whole grain toast with a dash of cinnamon and a sprinkle of a crystallized sweetener like Stevia or Splenda. Cinnamon also goes well with peanut butter or sugar-free jam on toast. 3 Use cinnamon in meat sauces. Cinnamon pairs well with poultry, pork, and beef spice rubs as well as Asian-themed dishes, marinades, and salad dressings. Mixing to taste, replace some of the sugar or brown sugar with cinnamon for homemade barbecue sauces, pulled pork marinade, berry compotes, and even marinara sauces. 4 Replace sugar in vegetable dishes. Use cinnamon in place of brown sugar or regular sugar in candied vegetable dishes, such as candied yams, baby carrots, or sweet stir fry. Cinnamon lends a complex, Continue reading >>

Herbs And Spices: Cinnamon's Link To Diabetes Control

Herbs And Spices: Cinnamon's Link To Diabetes Control

Today's Dietitian Vol. 17 No. 11 P. 12 Is this spice merely a folk remedy, or could it be a real help in diabetes management? Dietitians probably won't find the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommending cinnamon as part of its standard treatment guidelines for diabetes anytime soon, but cinnamon is viewed as an antidiabetes agent across much of the world.1 Many patients are interested in exploring cinnamon as a potential therapy. "About 10% to 20% of patients who come to our clinics either have tried cinnamon or are currently using it," says Brian Mowll, DC, CDE, a functional medicine practitioner at Sweet Life Diabetes Health Centers in the greater Philadelphia area. Similarly, an Australian survey of complementary and alternative medicine use among people with diabetes (primarily type 2) in Sydney found that 25% of respondents were using cinnamon to treat diabetes.2 The position of the ADA is that there's insufficient evidence to support the use of cinnamon in diabetes treatment, but there's research, including double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, suggesting a possible benefit.3-7 As a result, it's important for dietitians to stay abreast of what research and clinical experience shows so they can effectively counsel clients and patients. Science Behind Cinnamon Although some clinical trial results have been equivocal, several have shown benefits of cinnamon on glucose, lipid, and insulin levels.8-13 Studies also show cinnamon can potentiate insulin action and improve insulin resistance and glucose metabolism, although the detailed biochemical mechanisms aren't completely clear.14 Bioactive compounds in cinnamon affect several steps in insulin signaling pathways. For example, research has shown that certain water-soluble polyphenol compounds (type A polyphen Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Stevia And Cinnamon

Treating Diabetes With Stevia And Cinnamon

Type II diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. It normally manifests gradually. In this case, the pancreas produces insulin but it is not properly utilized. Treatment may be based on medication, insulin or both. It doesn’t usually present specific symptoms, so it can go quite unnoticed. We should try and control this disease because, if otherwise, over time, eye, kidney and nerve lesions can occur, as well as heart disease, stroke and even the need to amputate a limb. In this article, you will find out about a natural method for treating diabetes with stevia and cinnamon. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The treatment The specialist will assess our case and will give us a treatment to follow. A strict diet is essential, and we can also significantly get better if we exercise regularly, control our weight and follow some natural tips. In this article we present the two best natural remedies: stevia and cinnamon. Stevia We have learned about Stevia rebaudiana in recent years, although it is native to Paraguay, where it has always been consumed. This plant has proven its excellent properties not only as a natural sweetener with no calories but because of its multiple properties, the first of which is that it regulates glucose levels. We can take three daily infusions or directly in extracts or tablets. It is essential that it’s pure extract with a dark color, and not a refined sweetener that has no properties because they were removed. Cinnamon Some studies have shown that cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) lowers glucose, cholesterol and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes, and even keeps them in a low level for a while after taking it. Accordin Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Blood Sugar: Implications For Diabetes

Cinnamon And Blood Sugar: Implications For Diabetes

For people with diabetes, abnormally high blood sugar is an extremely significant challenge. Unless well controlled, high blood sugar leads to many health complications, including kidney and nerve damage, problems with your bones and joints, teeth infections and heart disease (1). There are many medications to help combat high blood sugar – but they come with their own side effects. As a result, many people look for ways to lower blood sugar naturally, with the help of various foods and their diets. One ingredient that can help with this is the spice cinnamon. For that matter, you may have already heard about cinnamon and blood sugar. In this post, I will show you why the relationship is so important. What is Cinnamon? As you are probably aware, cinnamon is a common kitchen spice and already has a key place in modern diets. For example, it is often used with cinnamon rolls and is an especially prevalent flavor in the colder months. Cinnamon is also frequently used as part of healthy hot drinks, like turmeric golden milk and as an addition to coffee or tea. I’ve also seen it used in keto dessert recipes and in fat bombs – so it makes for a highly versatile spice. Cinnamon itself is actually the inner bark from a handful of trees in the Cinnamomum genus. The bark is dried and minimally processed before being sold in either stick or powder form. There are two main types of cinnamon to consider. The first is Cassia cinnamon, which comes from the species Cinnamomum cassia. This is the most common type of cinnamon and also the least expensive. The other type if Ceylon cinnamon. The species here is Cinnamomum vernum and the cinnamon itself tends to have a finer texture when crushed. Additionally, the stick of cinnamon contains many thin layers (like in the image), making Continue reading >>

Top 3 Essential Oils For Diabetes (try Coriander Or Cinnamon)

Top 3 Essential Oils For Diabetes (try Coriander Or Cinnamon)

It is disheartening to see how diabetes has become one of the most common illnesses these days. With an estimated 10% population, and counting, diagnosed with the chronic condition, it is a clear sign that we must be doing something wrong. It is not only disturbingly widespread; it is also terminal. However, studies and pervasive research suggest that it can be managed, if not uprooted, with a change in diet and lifestyle. One of the most advocated methods to control and manage this disease is by using essential oils that can improve overall digestion and regulate body’s sensitivity to insulin. Essential oils have been around for thousands of years for a reason. They could treat anything from cuts and scrapes to anxiety disorders. However, nowadays, these oils are becoming a natural and affordable solution to expensive medicines. We have all heard about diabetes, know at least one person who is suffering from it, and still somehow manage to fall into the same bottomless pit. The best-known way to fight a problem is by acknowledging its presence. For starters, there are two types of Diabetes: – Type 1: This type is genetic. Once you are inflicted with Type 1, your body stops breaking down sugar and starches to convert it into glucose. Glucose is necessary for your body as it is an important source of energy. Your body also stops producing insulin, the hormone required by your body to transfer glucose from your bloodstream into your cells, creating a dependence on insulin shots. – Type 2: This is the most common form that prohibits your body from using insulin properly, developing a resistance to it. Initially, your pancreas works overtime, trying to create the insulin. However, after some time, it becomes difficult for it to make enough that is required by your bod Continue reading >>

Effect Of Cinnamon On Postprandial Blood Glucose, Gastric Emptying, And Satiety In Healthy Subjects1,2,3

Effect Of Cinnamon On Postprandial Blood Glucose, Gastric Emptying, And Satiety In Healthy Subjects1,2,3

Abstract Background: Previous studies of patients with type 2 diabetes showed that cinnamon lowers fasting serum glucose, triacylglycerol, and LDL- and total cholesterol concentrations. Objective: We aimed to study the effect of cinnamon on the rate of gastric emptying, the postprandial blood glucose response, and satiety in healthy subjects. Design: The gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured by using standardized real-time ultrasonography. Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed by using a crossover trial. The subjects were examined after an 8-h fast if they had normal fasting blood glucose concentrations. GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15–90 min after ingestion of 300 g rice pudding (GER1) or 300 g rice pudding and 6 g cinnamon (GER2). Results: The median value of GER1 was 37%, and that of GER2 was 34.5%. The addition of cinnamon to the rice pudding significantly delayed gastric emptying and lowered the postprandial glucose response (P < 0.05 for both). The reduction in the postprandial blood glucose concentration was much more noticeable and pronounced than was the lowering of the GER. The effect of cinnamon on satiety was not significant. Conclusions: The intake of 6 g cinnamon with rice pudding reduces postprandial blood glucose and delays gastric emptying without affecting satiety. Inclusion of cinnamon in the diet lowers the postprandial glucose response, a change that is at least partially explained by a delayed GER. Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes Mellitus

Cinnamon For Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder. People with diabetes are known to be at greater risk of cardiovascular disease (including heart attack, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease such as acute or chronic ischaemia of a leg resulting in severe pain when walking short distances). There is also an increased risk of eye disease, kidney failure, nerve damage and sexual dysfunction when compared to the general population. Improvements in the regulation of blood sugar levels may help to reduce the risk of these complications. Cinnamon bark has been shown in a number of animal studies to improve blood sugar levels, though its effect in humans is not too clear. Hence, the review authors set out to determine the effect of oral cinnamon extract on blood sugar and other outcomes. The authors identified 10 randomised controlled trials, which involved 577 participants with diabetes mellitus. Cinnamon was administered in tablet or capsule form, at a mean dose of 2 g daily, for four to 16 weeks. Generally, studies were not well conducted and lacked in quality. The review authors found cinnamon to be no more effective than placebo, another active medication or no treatment in reducing glucose levels and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a long-term measurement of glucose control. None of the trials looked at health-related quality of life, morbidity, death from any cause or costs. Adverse reactions to cinnamon treatment were generally mild and infrequent. Further trials investigating long-term benefits and risks of the use of cinnamon for diabetes mellitus are required. Rigorous study design, quality reporting of study methods, and consideration of important outcomes such as health-related quality of life and diabetes complications, are key areas in need of attention Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar And Fights Diabetes

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar And Fights Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease characterized by abnormally high blood sugar. If poorly controlled, it can lead to complications like heart disease, kidney disease and nerve damage (1). Treatment often includes medications and insulin injections, but many people are also interested in foods that can help lower blood sugar. One such example is cinnamon, a commonly used spice that's added to sweet and savory dishes around the world. It provides many health benefits, including the ability to lower blood sugar and help manage diabetes. This article tells you everything you need to know about cinnamon and its effects on blood sugar control and diabetes. Cinnamon is an aromatic spice derived from the bark of several species of Cinnamomum trees. While you may associate cinnamon with rolls or breakfast cereals, it has actually been used for thousands of years in traditional medicine and food preservation. To obtain cinnamon, the inner bark of Cinnamomum trees must be removed. The bark then undergoes a drying process that causes it to curl up and yield cinnamon sticks, or quills, which can be further processed into powdered cinnamon. Several different varieties of cinnamon are sold in the US, and they are typically categorized by two different types: Ceylon: Also called "true cinnamon," it's the most expensive type. Cassia: Less expensive and found in most food products containing cinnamon. While both types are sold as cinnamon, there are important differences between the two, which will be discussed later in this article. Cinnamon is made from the dried bark of Cinnamomum trees and is generally categorized into two varieties. A quick glance at cinnamon's nutrition facts may not lead you to believe that it's a superfood (2). But while it doesn't contain a lot of vitamins or minerals, it d Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

Go to: The incidence of type II diabetes is increasing across the world. Dietary modifications help the patients to control blood glucose. Traditional herbs and spices are commonly used for control of glucose among which cinnamon (Ròu Guì; Cinnamomum cassia) has the greatest effect. Research has shown that adding cinnamon to diet can help to lower the glucose level. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cinnamon on the glucose level in blood. This was a Randomized clinical trial in which 70 Patients with type II diabetes were assigned randomly two groups (35 in cinnamon and 35 in placebo group). The groups were matched in terms of body mass index (BMI), HbAlc and fasting blood sugar (FBS). Patients were treated with cinnamon and the placebo group was treated with placebo in addition to their routine treatment for 60 days. FBG levels and glycosylated hemoglobin of patients on the first day, and 1 and 2 months after treatment were measured. Data were analyzed using t-test and paired t-test in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).16 software. The mean levels of FBS before, and 1 and 2 months after the intervention were 174 ± 59, 169 ± 43 and 177 ± 45; respectively. The levels of HbAlc before and after the intervention in the cinnamon group were (8.9 ± 1.7 and 8.9 ± 1.6). There was no significant difference in FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin levels between the two groups (P = 0.738 and P = 0.87, respectively). Results showed that using certain amount of cinnamon for 60 days did not change the glucose level of diabetic patients. So, using cinnamon to type II diabetes patients cannot be recommended and more studies are needed in future. Keywords: Cinnamon, Diabetes, Fasting blood sugar, Herbal medicine Go to: INTRODUCTION Prevalence of diab Continue reading >>

United States Department Of Agriculture

United States Department Of Agriculture

This research is performed by the Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory (NRFL) of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC). Our studies have demonstrated that extracts of cinnamon increase insulin activity several-fold. These measurements are in vitro or test tube measurements of the ability of insulin to increase the breakdown of glucose. Insulin is the hormone that controls the utilization of the blood sugar, glucose. Improved insulin function leads to improved blood sugar concentrations. We have published several scientific articles on cinnamon that may be of interest. There is a report in Hormone Research, vol. 50, pages 177-182, 1998, and a second report in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 20, pages 327-336, 2001, which illustrate the mechanism of action of the cinnamon. A manuscript containing the structures of the active components is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 52, pages 65-70, 2004 (Abstract). Our human study involving people with type 2 diabetes demonstrating mean improvements in blood glucose ranging from 18 to 29%; triglycerides, 23 to 30%; LDL-cholesterol, 7 to 27% and total cholesterol, 12 to 26%, is published in Diabetes Care, vol. 26, pages 3215-3218, 2003. We have also shown that the active components of cinnamon are found in the water-soluble portion of cinnamon and are not present in cinnamon oil, which is largely fat-soluble. In addition to ground cinnamon consumed directly, one can also make a cinnamon tea and let the solids settle to the bottom or use cinnamon sticks, which make for a nice clear tea. Cinnamon can also be added to orange juice, oatmeal, coffee before brewing, salads, meats etc. The active components are not destroyed by heat. Our recent human studies Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Researchers have been investigating a number of powerful natural agents that can help you stabilize your blood sugar, and once again, cinnamon has proven itself as a viable contender in the fight against diabetes, as the study in Diabetic Medicine reveals.(1) One of cinnamon’s most impressive health benefits is its ability to improve blood glucose control. For example, just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day has previously been shown to significantly reduce blood sugar levels, triglycerides, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. (2) The more you can make use of natural therapies such as nutrition and exercise, the better your health will be. However, as helpful as supplements like cinnamon can be, they should not be misconstrued as cures. They are not substitutes for proper diet and lifestyle choices. You cannot properly address your diabetes if you still maintain a sedentary lifestyle and poor dietary choices — cinnamon supplementation or not! How Cinnamon Can Benefit Diabetics Below are five known ways cinnamon can be helpful to your metabolism: 1. Cinnamon can increase your glucose metabolism about 20-fold, which significantly improves blood sugar regulation. (4) 2. Cinnamon has been found to have “insulin-like effects” due to a bioactive compound, qualifying it as a candidate for an insulin substitute. 3. Cinnamon slows the emptying of your stomach to reduce sharp rises in blood sugar following meals, and improves the effectiveness, or sensitivity, of insulin. 4. Cinnamon actually enhances your antioxidant defenses. A study published in 2009 stated, “Polyphenols from cinnamon could be of special interest in people who are overweight with impaired fasting glucose since they might act as both insulin sensitizers a Continue reading >>

Sugar In Diabetic Patients

Sugar In Diabetic Patients

Getting Better All the Time Cinnamon Reduces Blood Clinical trial shows that an aqueous extract of the delightful spice benefits Western patients I really don’t think I need buns of steel. I’d be happy with buns of cinnamon. — Ellen DeGeneres omposer-performer Neil Young sang, in 1969, that he could be happy the rest of his life with a cinnamon girl. It’s not clear whether he was referring to pigmentation, a spicy disposition, a lingering fragrance, or perhaps even a state of robust health. “You see us together, chasing the moonlight,” he offered by way of explanation, which only added to the mystery. Two years earlier, the Beatles had sung, “I’ve got to admit it’s getting better, a little better all the time.” Although they were no strangers to herbal substances, they probably didn’t have cinnamon in mind when they composed that line. Intentions notwithstanding, though, the Beatles’ words fit the story of cinnamon very well—it just keeps getting better and better. Here’s why. Cinnamon Gets an Early Start The recorded history of cinnamon began at least as far back as 2700 B.C., when a Chinese herbalist wrote of its usefulness for fever, diarrhea, and menstrual problems. Down through the centuries—in Pharaonic Egypt, in ancient Rome, during the Middle Ages—cinnamon has been used as a medicinal herb as well as a seasoning. In the Middle Ages, it was thought to be an aphrodisiac. The spice was so esteemed in Europe that commerce in cinnamon contributed toward making Venice a wealthy city-state, and even centuries later, the persistent demand for it touched off warfare, conquests, and the occasional massacre. In modern times, cinnamon lost favor (but not flavor) as an appetite stimulant, digestant, antispasmodic, and antidiarrheal, at least i Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

If I say cinnamon, you say ... sugar? It's a popular combination, of course. But if you're interested in the health-promoting effects of cinnamon, you may want to think anew about the spice. For instance, says John Critchley, executive chef at Bourbon Steak Restaurant in Washington, D.C., why not add it to savory dishes? He uses cinnamon to create a spice and herb rub for lamb loin. He also whips up a great spinach salad with raisins, pine nuts and cinnamon. Critchley is a fan of the intense aromatics in cinnamon, especially in Saigon — a cousin of the cassia varieties of cinnamon most commonly used in the U.S. and Europe. And he says adding cinnamon to spice blends is a great way to layer flavors when you're cooking. And when you start to look at the potential health-promoting effects of the spice, there's even more incentive to experiment with it in the kitchen. Cinnamon comes from the bark of trees. It has long been considered a medicinal plant. There are several varieties, harvested from southern China to Southeast Asia. For years, there have been hints that adding cinnamon to your diet can help control blood sugar. And a recent spate of studies adds to the evidence that the effect is real. "Yes, it does work," says Paul Davis, a research nutritionist with the University of California, Davis. He authored a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medicinal Food that concluded that cinnamon lowers fasting blood glucose. "According to our results, it's a modest effect of about 3 to 5 percent," Davis says. This is about the level of reduction found in the older generation of diabetes drugs, he says. That makes the findings of interest not just to the 25 million Americans who already have diabetes, but also to the 80 million other people — nearly 1 in 4 of u Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes – Clearing The Confusion

Cinnamon And Diabetes – Clearing The Confusion

The use of cinnamon for blood sugar control is certainly not without controversy and confusion. The debate started back in 2003 when a group of researchers reported that among 60 patients studied and after only 40 days that all three levels of cinnamon used reduced fasting serum glucose 18–29%, triglycerides 23–30%, LDL cholesterol 7–27%, and total cholesterol 12–26%.[1] Those impressive results caused much stir among the Diabetes association groups who feared that diabetics would begin using cinnamon as a substitute for the meds their doctors had prescribed to control blood sugar. Then a meta-analysis published in 2007 reviewed five studies and concluded Cinnamon Has No Benefit for People With Diabetes.[2] And finally more recently, another meta-analysis published in 2012 included 6 studies and concluded just the opposite of the 2007 study. They reported positive conclusions on the blood sugar lowering effect of cinnamon.[3] Download this expert FREE guide, Diabetes Symptoms and Treatments: How to lower blood sugar with a diabetic diet, medications, and lifestyle changes. This new report tells you how you can take command of your diabetes, simplify blood sugar management, and make the most of today’s breakthroughs in treatment. US Department of Agriculture Identifies the Compound That Makes Cinnamon Work So who is to be believed and why are there such discrepancies? The US Department of Agriculture may have found the answer. Through their research, they determined that the bioactive compounds in cinnamon – what makes them work – are water-soluble compounds called Type-A polymers.[4] These compounds were isolated from cinnamon and were found to increase in vitro insulin activity by a factor of 20. They work by improving the effect of insulin on blood sugar Continue reading >>

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