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Diabetes And Cholesterol

A Guide To Living With Diabetes And High Cholesterol

A Guide To Living With Diabetes And High Cholesterol

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you know that controlling your blood sugar levels is important. The more you can keep these levels down, the lower your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other health problems. Having diabetes puts you at a higher risk for developing high cholesterol. As you watch your blood sugar numbers, watch your cholesterol numbers too. Here, we explain why these two conditions often show up together, and how you can manage both with practical lifestyle approaches. Diabetes and high cholesterol often occur together If you have both diabetes and high cholesterol, you’re not alone. The American Heart Association (AHA) states that diabetes often lowers HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels and raises triglycerides and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Both of these increase the risk for heart disease and stroke. The National Diabetes Statistics Report of 2014 shared similar findings. Between 2009 and 2012, about 65 percent of adults with diabetes had LDL cholesterol levels higher than ideal, or used cholesterol-lowering medications. As a reminder: An LDL cholesterol level under 100 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dL) is considered ideal. 100–129 mg/dL is close to ideal. 130–159 mg/dL is borderline elevated. High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. Cholesterol is a type of fat that can build up inside the arteries. Over time, it can harden to form a stiff plaque. That damages arteries, making them stiff and narrow and inhibiting blood flow. The heart has to work harder to pump blood, and risk for heart attack and stroke go up. Why diabetes increases risk of high cholesterol Scientists aren’t sure yet exactly how diabetes affects cholesterol, but they’re working on it. Some research has pointed to a connection between insulin and Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol Mary Jenkins is 51 and lives in Kanab, Utah. Last December, before starting her new diet, she weighed 225 pounds. She has since lost 50 poundsand the weight is still coming off. This is her story. I was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, so I lived off a Southern-fried diet for most of my life. As a result, I had extremely high blood pressure for over 30 years. I tried every eating plan out there to get it under control: low-carb diets, high-protein dietsall that stuff. None of it worked for me. I was still obese, and my cholesterol levels didnt improve. (Discover the ONE simple, natural solution that can help you reverse chronic inflammation and heal more than 45 diseases. Try The Whole Body Cure today !) Then two years ago, my doctor ordered an A1C test. He had a hunch I may have type 2 diabetes as a result of my weight. My score was a seven, which meant his suspicions were correct. (A normal A1C level is below 5.7. ) It got worse: Because Ive had high blood pressure for so long, he said I could have long-term organ damage now that I also had diabetes. Youd think at that point, he would have sat me down and talked to me about how I could improve my diet, but he didnt. He just said something like, Watch your carbs and exercise. That was it. So I basically kept living as I had before. MORE: 15 Common Risk Factors Of Type 2 Diabetes Then my doctor moved away, and I found another doctor in a larger town nearby. My new physician told me that I needed to go on metformin (the generic name for a drug used to treat high blood sugar levels) immediately. He also told me that I should ramp up my exercise routine. So last year, I started hiking and rock climbing with my neighbor, who happens to be a yoga inst Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

What is the relationship between cholesterol and diabetes? How does cholesterol affect my diabetes, and how do I manage it? Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil When Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she had questions about her cholesterol. Though her overall number was at 180 mg/dl, and in a normal range, her LDL-C was higher than normal, although mildly elevated, and her HDL-C was low. Her doctor had explained very little about this to Judy, and she was confused. How can her overall cholesterol number be acceptable, but her other cholesterol numbers were out of range. What did this mean for Judy’s health? Was she more prone to heart disease and stroke due to these cholesterol numbers? Her triglycerides were a little elevated, too. We decided to give Judy a guide that would help her to fully understand her cholesterol numbers, and how they affect her cardiovascular health. We also wanted to make sure that Judy and others like her understand how their cholesterol numbers relate to their diabetes. So let’s get started… What is cholesterol Cholesterol is mainly comprised of fat and lipoproteins. A lipoprotein is comprised of cholesterol, protein, and fat (triglycerides). Cholesterol comes from two sources. Our body manufactures some cholesterol on its own. In addition, cholesterol comes from animal products, such as milk, eggs, cheese, and meats. Cholesterol has the consistency similar to gum or wax. Small amounts of cholesterol are important for a healthy cell membrane (good cholesterol), and some cholesterol has been deemed, “the bad cholesterol,” due to these cholesterol particles tends to cause atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Some cholesterol is “good,” cholesterol, that tends to carry the bad cholesterol away and out the body. That is why y Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways To Lower Your Cholesterol

High cholesterol has long been known to raise the risk of heart and blood vessel disease in people with diabetes and without. Unfortunately, it’s very common among Americans generally, including those with diabetes. The good news is that there’s a lot you can do to lower your cholesterol and, consequently, lower your risk of heart disease. Making the effort to lower blood cholesterol is especially important for people with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — who have a higher risk of heart disease than the general public. The bad guy: LDL Your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol is the culprit when it comes to raising the risk of heart disease. LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein, and if you have too much of it in your blood, it can build up along the insides of your artery walls, leading to the formation of fatty deposits called plaque. Plaque makes it harder for blood to flow through your arteries, which means that less blood can get to vital organs, such as your heart and brain. Sometimes this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Plaque can also rupture, triggering the formation of blood clots, which can also block the arteries, leading to a heart attack or stroke. So it makes sense to keep your LDL level low. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most adults with diabetes who are not taking cholesterol-lowering statins have a fasting lipid profile done at diagnosis, first medical evaluation, and thenevery five years after, while those taking statins should have the test done when they start the medication and periodically thereafter. This test measures HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, as well as the level of triglycerides (a type of blood fat) in the blood. HDL cholesterol above 50 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, and triglycerides below 150 mg Continue reading >>

Diabetes-cholesterol Combo Drug Approved By Fda

Diabetes-cholesterol Combo Drug Approved By Fda

Diabetes-Cholesterol Combo Drug Approved by FDA The first medication to treat both type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol has received Food and Drug Administration approval. The drug, Juvisync, is a combination of the diabetes medication Januvia (sitagliptin) and the cholesterol-lowering statin Zocor (simvastatin). The convenience of a single pill isn't Juvisync's only selling point: The combination pill will sell for the same price as Januvia. According to the manufacturer, Merck, plans are in the works for the drug's release "in the near future." The medication was approved in three dosage strengths100 mg of Januvia and either 10, 20, or 40 mg of Zocorthough the company, at the FDA's urging, will also develop doses with the same amount of Zocor and only 50 mg of Januvia. The FDA said that while statins like Zocor have the potential to raise blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes, the drugs' ability to reduce the likelihood of heart disease outweighed the small risk. Other possible side effects of Juvisync include headache, sore throat, stomach pain, and upper respiratory infections, such as a cold or sinus infection. The significance of the FDA's October 7 approval of Juvisync is potentially huge: More than 20 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes, and they're two to four times as likely to die from heart disease as adults without the disease. High LDL ("bad") cholesterol is a cause of heart disease. "Although clinical guidelines put people with type 2 diabetes who need glycemic and lipid therapy at the same risk level as those with coronary heart disease," said Barry J. Goldstein, MD, PhD, vice president of diabetes and endocrinology at Merck, in a statement, "nearly 40 percent of eligible patients do not receive statin treatment." Continue reading >>

Diabetes Contributes To Cholesterol Metabolism Regardless Of Obesity

Diabetes Contributes To Cholesterol Metabolism Regardless Of Obesity

The two groups were of similar age, sex, weight, BMI, apoE phenotype distribution, and dietary intakes, and the study groups were well comparable, with the exception of blood glucose levels. Serum and LDL cholesterol levels in both groups exceeded the recent recommendations,[ 26 ] but none of the subjects received lipid-lowering medication. In addition, all women were postmenopausal without hormone replacement therapy. Despite similar serum cholesterol levels, HDL cholesterol was lower and triglyceride contents in serum and VLDL were higher in the diabetic group than in the control group, revealing the typical lipoprotein lipid profile of diabetes. From among the possible confounding variables affecting the low cholesterol absorption efficiency in the diabetic group, apoE phenotype distribution, dietary cholesterol, and plant sterol intakes were similar, and none of the subjects in the diabetic group had any symptoms of gastroparesis. In addition, antidiabetic drugs had no consistent effect on the cholesterol absorption, and diabetes had been recently diagnosed. According to our results, diabetes seems to either upregulate cholesterol synthesis or downregulate cholesterol absorption efficiency as compared with the respective nondiabetic state, when obesity is not a confounding factor. Our results convincingly show for the first time the additional effects of diabetes on cholesterol absorption and synthesis in obese subjects. The question then arises, what is initially responsible for the altered cholesterol metabolism in diabetes? Because it has been found that efficient weight loss in diabetic individuals improves cholesterol absorption efficiency and markers of insulin resistance,[ 16 ] cholesterol absorption efficiency might be the variable being affected primarily. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Cholesterol | Joslin Diabetes Center

Diabetes & Cholesterol | Joslin Diabetes Center

Lipids are fat-like substances found in the blood. Cholesterol and triglycerides are two types of lipids. The body needs some lipids to stay healthy, but elevated lipid levels can damage artery walls, causing atherosclerosis, or hardening of artery walls, which can cause heart attacks. Below is a quick reference guide to the types of terms that you may have heard from your doctor when discussing cholesterol levels. According to Tracey Lucier, Nutrition Educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, cholesterol is found only in animal foods, such as eggs, milk, cheese, liver, meat and chicken. "Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in your liver and found in foods. Your total blood cholesterol level should be 200 mg/dL or lower," Lucier states. The body needs cholesterol to perform several functions including cell maintenance, and also metabolizes fat soluble vitamins, among many other activities. Having elevated LDL cholesterol levels for a significant period of time can damage arteries. When LDL is high, it causes the formation of "plaque" in the blood, damaging and block arteries. --LDL readings should be less than 100; less than 70 if you have diabetes and heart disease This type of cholesterol works to clear LDL cholesterol from the blood, keeping the arteries open. When HDL cholesterol is too low,fewer amounts ofLDL cholesterol is removed from the blood, increasing the risk of damage to the arteries. --HDL should be greater than 40 for women; greater than 50 for men High triglycerides prevent HDL from removing LDL from the blood. They also produce LDL that blocks arteries. --Triglyceride levels should be less than 150 Continue reading >>

How To Eat If You Have High Cholesterol And Diabetes

How To Eat If You Have High Cholesterol And Diabetes

If you have been diagnosed with both high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes , you may be feeling overwhelmed at the prospect of changing your diet. You should know that there is considerable overlap for how to eat with the two conditionsand that it is not as difficult as you may think. Here are three first steps for managing high cholesterol and diabetes through your diet. Start by eating more vegetables. There's a reason the diabetic plate method recommends filling half of your plate with non-starchy vegetablesthey're loaded with fiber. They're also high in good-for-you phytonutrients, but fiber is the biggest benefit for both cholesterol and diabetes. Fiber is the indigestible part of plants. You eat it, it fills you up, but it doesn't add any calories. That's helpful for diabetessince many people with type 2 diabetes are also watching their weight. Soluble fiber (the kind found in beans, apples, oatmeal) aids in lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol and also helps to keep blood glucose levels steady. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are the best sources of fiber. Aim to increase the amount of fiber you eat every day gradually, to at least 25 grams per day if you're a woman; 38 grams per day if you're a man. Another healthy change for both diabetes and high cholesterol is to swap the fats and oils you use. As a general rule, you want to eat more monounsaturated fats (found in foods such as walnuts, avocado, and olive oil) and decrease saturated fats (found in marbled meats and full-fatdairy products) and trans fats (found in fried foods and baked goods). This one might be harder, but getting to a healthy weight can improve both your diabetes and your high cholesterol. Losing weight can help you lower your average blood glucose levels, as well as lower your total cho Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Metabolism In Type 1 Diabetes.

Cholesterol Metabolism In Type 1 Diabetes.

Abstract Little information is available on cholesterol absorption and synthesis in human type 1 diabetes. We studied these variables using serum cholesterol precursor sterol ratios to cholesterol as surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis and those of cholestanol and plant sterols to reflect cholesterol absorption in seven type 1 diabetic subjects and in five age- and body weight-matched control subjects. Total and lipoprotein cholesterol levels were similar, but triglycerides in intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and LDL were higher in type 1 diabetic than in control subjects. Most of the marker sterols were transported by LDL and HDL in both groups. The percentage of esterified cholesterol was lower in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in diabetic patients than in control subjects. The ratios of the absorption marker sterols in serum were higher, and those of the synthesis markers were lower in type 1 diabetic than in control subjects. The increased cholestanol ratios were seen in all lipoproteins, and those of free and total plant sterols were mainly in LDL, whereas the decreased free and total synthesis markers were mainly in all lipoproteins. In conclusion, high absorption and low synthesis marker sterols seem to characterize human type 1 diabetes. These findings could be related to low expression of ABC G/5 G/8 genes, resulting in high absorption of cholesterol and sterols in general and low synthesis of cholesterol compared with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

About Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

WELCHOL is not for those with blood triglyceride levels of > 500 mg/dL Type 2 diabetes is the more common form of diabetes1 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes2,3 More than 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese3 Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, family history, and physical inactivity.3 Common symptoms of diabetes may include urinating often, feeling very thirsty, feeling very hungry (even though you are eating), extreme fatigue, blurry vision, cuts/bruises that are slow to heal, and tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands and/or feet (type 2). However, some people with type 2 diabetes may not experience any symptoms.4 Type 2 diabetes in adults is a chronic condition that should be taken seriously Type 2 diabetes can be associated with many serious health complications including5: Neuropathy (tingling, pain, numbness, or weakness in the feet and/or hands) Kidney disease Eye complications Skin complications High blood pressure Stroke Welchol has not been shown to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, stroke, or any of the above risks. Please see "What is Welchol® (colesevelam HCl)" and "Important Safety Information about Welchol" below. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains that type 2 diabetes is a problem with the body that causes blood sugar levels to be high, either because the body doesn't make enough of the insulin hormone, or the body does not use insulin properly. When your body does not use insulin properly, this is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar levels normal. Type 2 diabetes is treated with lifestyle changes (healthy eating and exerc Continue reading >>

Diets For Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

Diets For Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

People with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have a metabolic abnormality called insulin resistance in which body tissues respond sluggishly to the hormone insulin. This leads to high blood sugar and abnormal blood fat levels. People with T2DM commonly have high levels of triglycerides and "bad" cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein, and low levels of "good" cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein. High blood sugar along with blood fat abnormalities increases the risk of heart disease and stroke among people with diabetes 2- to 4-fold, warns the American Heart Association. Fortunately, both blood sugar and blood fat levels can be improved with diet. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends individualized nutrition plans that meet certain guidelines rather than specific diets. Calorie restriction is important, however, for people with T2DM who are overweight. Video of the Day A Mediterranean diet refers to eating patterns of olive-growing countries along the Mediterranean sea, such as Spain, Greece and southern Italy. The diet emphasizes consumption of olive oil, fruits, vegetables, beans, grains, nuts and seeds. Moderate intake of poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, cheese and yogurt also characterizes the diet, while intake of red meat and sweets is limited. Wine with meals is common with a traditional Mediterranean diet, but may not be included if weight loss is a goal. An August 2015 "BMJ Open" article reviewed the pooled evidence from published research examining the effects of the Mediterranean diet on T2DM and prediabetes management. The authors reported that several studies showed the diet significantly reduced total cholesterol and increased HDL. Several studies also showed that following a Mediterranean diet led to weight loss, which itself is a factor in lowering Continue reading >>

How Triglycerides Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

How Triglycerides Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

No one wants type 2 diabetes. It’s a condition that affects your whole body and gets progressively worse, possibly leading to loss of vision and feeling (especially in your feet and fingertips), as well as kidney disease and heart disease. Having high triglycerides makes it more likely that you will develop diabetes, though. Luckily, with some effort, you have a good chance of lowering your triglycerides -- which, at the same time, can help you lower your chance of getting diabetes. High triglycerides don't cause diabetes. Instead, their levels indicate that your system for turning food into energy isn't working properly. Normally, your body makes insulin, which “escorts” glucose -- the type of sugar in your blood --inside your cells. There, your body turns glucose into energy. Insulin also allows your body to use triglycerides for energy. A common cause of high triglycerides is excess carbohydrates in your diet. High TG’s signals insulin resistance; that’s when you have excess insulin and blood sugar isn’t responding in normal ways to insulin. This results in higher than normal blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, you’re one step closer to type 2 diabetes. If you also are overweight, eat a lot of sugary and starchy foods, or don’t exercise, your insulin resistance can be worse. You can reverse your tracks by following the exercise and meal plan your doctor recommends to lower your triglycerides and by taking prescribed medicine. Your doctor can check your blood sugar (also called glucose) levels, by taking a sample of your blood after you’ve fasted, which means you haven’t eaten for at least 8 hours. The doctor may also test the level of glucose in your blood with a special blood test called A1c. The result shows the average level of Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Cholesterol Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

An international team of scientists have discovered a possible link between accumulation of cholesterol and type 2 diabetes. The study was based at Canada's Vancouver Child and Family Research Institute at the University of British Columbia, and is published online in Nature Medicine. Type 2 diabetes is defined by two things. One is insulin resistance, and the other is reduced insulin production. The second is caused by reduction in insulin release by "beta cells" in the pancreas. Why this happens is poorly understood; however, it has been suggested that the build up of toxic lipids in the cells could be a reason. Using mice, scientists showed that pancreatic beta cells, responsible for insulin release, begin to malfunction when their cholesterol levels build up. They examined the role of a molecular transporter called "ATP-binding cassette transporter A1" (ABCA1). ABCA1 is important for "cholesterol homeostasis" which regulates cholesterol levels in cells. It also affects insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. The scientists used genetically engineered mice and switched off their ABCA1 genes. They found that these mice had normal insulin sensitivity, but lower levels of insulin secretion and significantly impaired glucose tolerance, displaying one of the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. They effectively became diabetic. When they examined the pancreas of the mice, isolated and tested the cells "in vitro", they found the cholesterol homeostasis was different to normal as was the secretion of insulin. They also found a significant accumulation of cholesterol in the beta cells. Cholesterol plays a number of roles in the human body, and one of these is to keep cell membranes healthy so they allow the right chemicals to pass in and out of the cells. However, the le Continue reading >>

4 Tips For Eating Well With High Cholesterol

4 Tips For Eating Well With High Cholesterol

Here’s some good news: it doesn’t take a huge effort to start making heart-healthy food decisions. Especially when you have diabetes and high cholesterol, watching your diet is critical. There are changes you can make to what you eat every day. We recommend that you talk to a certified diabetes educator or registered dietitian about changing how you eat. They can work with you to create a meal plan that is delicious, flexible (you won’t always be eating the same thing), and healthy—for both your heart and your diabetes. In the meantime, here are 4 tips to help you eat well when you have high cholesterol. Eat More Whole Grains Conveniently enough, many pastas and breads have whole grain versions. The next time you’re shopping, reach for the whole grain pasta instead of the regular pasta. Also, try replacing white rice with brown rice. You could also have whole grain couscous. Eat More Fruits and Veggies We know you’ve heard it before, but it’s true: you should eat your fruits and veggies. All the fiber in fruits and vegetables can help lower your cholesterol, so try to work more of them into your day. For example, you could mix fruit into your yogurt for breakfast. You can snack on raw vegetables throughout the day. You can make it a point to shop your local farmers’ market (if you have one) to get seasonal produce. Cook with Olive Oil Instead of cooking with vegetable oil, cook with olive oil, which is a “healthy” fat. Olive oil has monounsaturated fats in it, which are healthier than saturated fat or trans fat. Limit High Cholesterol Foods The next time you’re at the store, make it a point to read the food label of everything before you put it in the cart. Choose foods that are low cholesterol—or even no cholesterol! The Nutrition Facts label wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Cholesterol 101

Diabetes And High Cholesterol 101

Cholesterol is a type of fat found in the blood. Everyone has it, but people with diabetes are more likely to have unhealthy levels of LDL, which can cause narrowing or blocking of the blood vessels. This blockage, when severe, keeps blood from reaching some areas of the heart, increasing your risk for a heart attack or stroke. There are two types of cholesterol in the blood: HDL and LDL. LDL levels should be kept low to help protect your heart. By contrast, HDL is a healthy fat that helps clear fatty deposits from your blood vessels and protect your heart. Try thinking "L should be low, H is healthy" to help you remember the difference between the two types. Triglycerides are another type of fat in your blood that can add to your risk of a heart attack or stroke at high levels, similar to the effect of high cholesterol. Know the Numbers What are the low and high levels of cholesterol for those with diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), most adults with diabetes should aim for an LDL level of less than 100 mg/dl. The ADA-recommended HDL levels are greater than 40 mg/dl for men with diabetes and greater than 50 mg/dl for women with diabetes. The ADA recommends that both men and women with diabetes aim for triglyceride levels less than 150 mg/dl. What's mg/dl? It stands for milligrams of cholesterol per deciliter of blood -- the standard unit of measure for cholesterol and triglycerides. Everyone, including people with diabetes, needs some cholesterol in their blood to help build healthy cells. However, there are no symptoms to alert you if your LDL is too high or your HDL is too low. A blood test at your doctor's office is the only way to know. As a result, it is especially important to have your cholesterol checked regularly (at least yearly) i Continue reading >>

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