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Diabetes And Carbs

Eat Carbs Last For Better Diabetes Control

Eat Carbs Last For Better Diabetes Control

Eating carbs last at mealtime could help people with diabetes control blood glucose levels, according to new research. If you’re like many people with diabetes, you are probably saying, “I thought carbohydrates were bad for people with diabetes.” No, carbohydrates are not bad, but if you eat the wrong type or too many of them at a meal or snack, they will cause your blood glucose level to go up higher than you want after eating. Results of a new study suggest when you eat carbohydrate can also affect your blood glucose level. When individuals in the study with type 2 diabetes ate protein and vegetables before eating bread and orange juice at mealtime their blood glucose levels were half as high as when they ate carbohydrate first, and 40% lower than when they ate protein, vegetables, and carbohydrate together. Moreover, when the study participants ate carbohydrate last, their insulin levels were lower, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels were higher. GLP-1 is a hormone that helps control your blood glucose and appetite; these changes in insulin and GLP-1 levels could provide the added benefit of weight loss. What is Carbohydrate? There are three main types of carbohydrates; sugar, starch, and fiber. Sugar is called by many names; table sugar, cane sugar, brown sugar, turbinado, demerara, maple syrup, molasses, honey, and high-fructose corn syrup. Fruit sugar (fructose) and milk sugar (lactose) are also sugars. The main difference is that the naturally occurring sugar in some foods comes with many nutritional benefits like the fiber in fruit, the calcium in milk, the iron in molasses. When you start adding sugar to foods though, you’re not increasing the nutritional value, just boosting calories. Related Starch, the second type of carbohydrate, is also bas Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes Risks Tied To Carbs, Not Fat, Study Finds

Heart Disease And Diabetes Risks Tied To Carbs, Not Fat, Study Finds

MORE Is the pendulum swinging back? In what seems contrary to mainstream dietary advice, a small new study shows that doubling the saturated fat in a person's diet does not drive up the levels of saturated fat in the blood. Rather, the study found that it was the carbohydrates in people's diets that were linked with increased levels of a type of fatty acid linked to heart disease and type-2 diabetes. The results of the study, which followed 16 middle-aged, obese adults for 21 weeks, were published Nov. 21 in the journal PLOS ONE. Saturated fats, largely from meat and dairy products, have been vilified for decades as a primary culprit in promoting heart disease. And most health authorities maintain this stance. However, in recent years, scientists have seen the ill effects of completely replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates, particularly the simple carbs that are found so commonly in processed foods. A large analysis published in 2009 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that swapping saturated fats with carbs had no benefit in reducing people's risk of heart disease. But replacing those so-called bad fats with polyunsaturated fats — found in fish, olives and nuts — did. "The unintended consequence of telling everyone to restrict fat was that people ate an even greater amount of carbohydrates," said Jeff Volek, senior author on the new study and a professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University. "This is a fact. It's not a stretch to make the connection between overconsumption of carbs and the obesity and diabetes epidemic." The new study "challenges the conventional wisdom that has demonized saturated fat," Volek said, because it shows that saturated fats don't need to be replaced at all, neither with carbs nor polyunsaturated fats. [7 F Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Counting ''net'' Carbs

Eating With Diabetes: Counting ''net'' Carbs

Since low carbohydrate diets became popular, the phrase "net carbs" has become a fairly regular fixture on the labels of food products. But, if you are not familiar with the term you may be wondering what in the world it means! There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. All three types of carbs are added up and listed as Total Carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts Label of a food product. The concept of net carbs is based on the fact that, although it is considered a carbohydrate, dietary fiber is not digested the same way the other two types of carbohydrates (starches and sugars) are. While starches and sugars are broken down into glucose (blood sugar), fiber isn't treated the same way. The fiber you eat passes through the body undigested and helps add bulk to your stool (among other benefits). The indigestibility of fiber is where the idea of "net carbs" comes in. In fact, sometimes, net carbs are sometimes referred to as "digestible carbs.'' In recent years, food manufacturers have started including net carbs in addition to total carbs when labeling products. Many foods proudly display net carbs on their labels to entice both low-carb diet fans and people with diabetes. While the concept of net carbs can be utilized in diabetes meal planning, read labels with a discerning eye. At present there are no mandated rules for calculating or labeling net carbs on food packages. The FDA does not regulate or oversee the use of these terms, and exactly what is listed as "net carbs" can vary dramatically from product to product. Some products calculate net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber, other labels reflect net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber minus sugar alcohols, and still others calculate net carbs as total carbohydra Continue reading >>

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

Choosing "good" carbs can help you manage diabetes and provide plenty of energywithout blood sugar spikesto fuel your day. If you have diabetes, you probably know to watch your carbohydrates. Carbs can cause spikes in blood sugar which, over time, can lead to dangerous diabetes complications. "By no means are we going to avoid carbs," says Chaparro, who has type 1 diabetes herself. The trick is choosing smart carbs: whole grains, fruits, dairy and other foods with low glucose impactmeaning they're less likely to cause those blood-sugar peaks and lows. Smart carbs, Chaparro says, "can actually do a lot of good for you and your diabetes control." Here are nine super-smart carbsplus some tasty, diabetes-friendly recipesto add to your menu planning. When you have diabetes, it's important to spread your carbs throughout your day to be consistent with your intake. Timing in your actual meal counts, too: a recent small study published by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York found that starting with a non-carb, like a protein or vegetable first, and saving carbs for last may help keep blood sugars steady. Why we love them: Stacks of recent research show that eating more plant-based foods is good for your heart healthand that's especially important if you have diabetes. Lentils deliver protein, carbs, fiber and iron all in one tasty package. Why we love them: Berries of any kind are a great choice if you have diabetes, and blueberries are a superhero. Low in calories and high in carbs and fiber, they also pack plenty of vitamin C and heart-healthy antioxidants. Recipes to try: Berry-Almond Smoothie Bowl (pictured) or Wild Blueberry Bagel Why we love them: We're sweet on sweet potatoes for plenty of reasons. They're tasty, versatile, loaded with carbs, fiber Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

1 / 9 Making the Best Carb Choices for Diabetes "When you say 'carbohydrate,' most people think of sugar," says Meredith Nguyen, RD, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Methodist Charlton Medical Center Diabetes Self-Management Program in Dallas. But that's only half the story. Carbohydrates are also starches and valuable fiber, which are found in many nutrient-rich foods that should be part of a diabetes diet. Sugar is the basic building block that, depending on how it's organized, creates either starches or fiber. You need about 135 grams of carbohydrates every day, spread fairly evenly throughout your meals. Instead of trying to avoid carbs completely, practice planning your diabetes diet with everything in moderation. "There's nothing you can't have," Nguyen says. "The catch is that you might not like the portion size or frequency." Use this list of healthy carbohydrates to help you stay balanced. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Health Tracking

Diabetes And Health Tracking

Diabetes affects over 25.8 million people in the U.S. Each year, nearly 2 million adults are diagnosed with this disease. Diabetes is a major cause for heart disease and stroke, and it is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. 1 in 3 Americans born after 2000 are at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes. Overall, the risk for death for those with diabetes is twice of those without diabetes. Diabetes must be stopped. Healthy living is a key step in improving both health outcomes and quality of life when living with this disease. Healthy eating, being active, and tracking symptoms can help you self-manage your diabetes. And MyNetDiary's Diabetes Tracking service can help make it easy for you to do! MyNetDiary Maximum includes awesome, comprehensive, and easy to use tools for tracking diabetes. It's all here in one place - everything you need to track Diabetes Type I, Diabetes Type II, Pre-Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes. Easy and Comprehensive The Diabetes Tracking Service is built on our solid foundation of the modern and comprehensive diet service MyNetDiary available since 2007. The service is powered by the #1 food database in the world and the top food and exercise tracking tools. iPhone App Android App for Phone and Tablet Online and Mobile - Always in Sync When you want to have most powerful and comprehensive tracking both online and mobile, you need a MyNetDiary Maximum subscription and you will get access to diabetes tracking both online and on the free iPhone app. Make sure to sign in with your Maximum account name and both the website and the app will automatically sync with each other. The Diabetes Tracking Service is included at no extra cost for MyNetDiary Maximum subscribers. Track All Details You Need Blood glucose tracking with multiple Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Counting Carbs If You Use Insulin

Diabetes: Counting Carbs If You Use Insulin

Introduction Carbohydrate, or carb, counting is an important skill to learn when you have diabetes. Carb counting helps you keep tight control of your blood sugar (glucose) level. It also gives you the flexibility to eat what you want. This can help you feel more in control and confident when managing your diabetes. Carb counting helps you keep your blood sugar at your target level. It allows you to adjust the amount of insulin you take. This amount is based on how many grams of carbs you eat at a meal or snack. The formula used to find how much insulin you need is called the insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio. The insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio is not the same for each person. You and your doctor will find your ratio by keeping track of the food you eat and testing your blood sugar level after meals. How do you count carbohydrate grams in your diet? To count carb grams at a meal, you need to know how many carbs are in each type of food you eat. This includes all food, whether it is a slice of bread, a bowl of lettuce, or a spoonful of salad dressing. Most packaged foods have labels that tell you how many total carbs are in one serving. Carbohydrate guides can help too. You can get these from diabetes educators and the American Diabetes Association. To find out how many carbs are in food that is not packaged, you will need to know standard portions of carbohydrate foods. Each serving size or standard portion has about 15 grams of carbs. By using the number of grams of carbs in a meal, you can figure out how much insulin to take. This is based on your personal insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio. For example: Your doctor may advise you to take 1 unit of rapid-acting insulin for every 10 to 15 grams of carbs you eat. So if your meal has 50 grams of carbs and your doctor says you need Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Conquering Diabetes With Carbohydrates

Conquering Diabetes With Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates do not cause type 2 diabetes. In fact, a new study found just the opposite: A diet rich in carbohydrates can actually fight diabetes. A wide range of other studies looking at plant-based diets and diabetes have consistently shown similar results. But you would not know that if you read the New York Times this weekend. On Sunday, the paper published an opinion piece urging Americans to ditch not only sugars, but wheat, rice, corn, potatoes—even fruit—to fight diabetes and obesity. The article also recommended replacing these foods with meat, eggs, and butter. Advice like this is dangerous. Another recent study of more than 200,000 participants found that consuming large amounts of animal protein increased diabetes risk by 13 percent. But by simply replacing 5 percent of animal protein with vegetable protein—including carbohydrates like potatoes and grains—participants decreased diabetes risk by 23 percent. Epidemiological studies tell a similar story. Traditionally, minimally processed and unprocessed carbohydrates, including rice and starchy vegetables, were the main staples in countries like Japan and China—and type 2 diabetes was rare. But as time went on, Western diets filled with meat, cheese, and highly processed foods replaced these traditional carbohydrate-based diets, and diabetes rates soared. So how does it work? Insulin’s job in our bodies is to move glucose, or sugar, from our blood into our cells. But when there’s too much fat in our diets, fat builds up in our cells. Evidence shows that this cellular fat can actually interfere with insulin’s ability to move glucose into our cells, leading to type 2 diabetes. (Watch this video to learn more.) At the Physicians Committee, we have been putting this idea into practice for more tha Continue reading >>

Understanding Carbohydrates

Understanding Carbohydrates

The best way to regulate your intake is to count the carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are counted in grams, which is a measure of weight. Even a few grams can make a difference. If you have type 1 diabetes, you must match your carbohydrate intake to your insulin dose. To get the best blood sugar result, your carbohydrate count must be accurate. When you have type 2 diabetes, your blood sugar will go up if you eat too much carbohydrate. And if you are treated with oral medications that release insulin from the pancreas, or insulin, you must match your carbohydrate intake to your medication dose. To get the best blood sugar result, you need to know how much carbohydrate is in your food and regulate your carbohydrate intake. The best way to regulate your carbohydrate intake is to “count the carbohydrates” in your food. Carbohydrates are counted in grams, which is a measure of weight – and even a few grams more or less can make a difference in your blood sugar reading. In this section, you will learn about: Chemistry, Digestion and Sources of Carbohydrates Chemistry of Carbohydrate Carbohydrate is sugar – and includes both single sugar units called sugar (or glucose) and chains of sugar units chemically linked together called starch. Carbohydrate has to be broken down into single sugar units to be absorbed. Glucose is the most common sugar unit in our food and in our bodies. Digestion of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate has to be broken down into single sugar units to be absorbed. Sources of Carbohydrate Carbohydrates are found in: Rice, grains, cereals, and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Vegetables, like potatoes, corn, peas and winter squash Fruit Milk Yogurt Sugars, like table sugar and honey Foods and drinks made wi Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates — Part Of A Healthful Diabetes Diet

Carbohydrates — Part Of A Healthful Diabetes Diet

A common nutrition myth is that individuals with diabetes need to avoid carbohydrates. While individuals with diabetes must be mindful of how much carbohydrates they eat, they don't need to avoid it altogether. Carbohydrates are the body's main source of fuel and are necessary to maintain proper cellular function. The type of carbohydrates and portion size are what matter most. There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. Starches are found naturally in foods such as bread, cereal, rice, crackers, pasta, potatoes, peas, corn and beans. Sugars are found naturally in foods including fruits and milk and are also concentrated in processed foods such as candy, cake and soda. Fiber is the roughage in plant foods and helps keep the digestive tract healthy. Soluble fiber, found in foods including oatmeal and fruit, can help maintain a healthy cholesterol level. Individuals with diabetes should choose most of their carbohydrates from nutrient-rich whole foods such as fruits and vegetables, beans, whole grains and dairy products. Sweets and sugary beverages should be saved for special occasions. And, spreading carbohydrates evenly throughout the day helps prevents spikes and dips in blood sugar. A registered dietitian nutritionist can create a specific meal plan that harmonizes individual preferences with the special needs of someone with diabetes. To get a general idea of how much carbohydrates to eat, consider someone on a 2,000-calorie meal plan. For 2,000 calories, an RDN may recommend that one meal contain about 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates. Carbohydrate intake at meals depends upon how many meals and snacks a person plans to eat throughout the day. A serving of carbohydrates is 15 grams. Here are examples of one-serving portions of some carbohydrat Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

11 Diabetes Dinner Mistakes To Avoid

11 Diabetes Dinner Mistakes To Avoid

Evening meals can be stressful and rushed, echoing our lives that are chaotic and overscheduled. In light of this, people with diabetes unintentionally make some common mistakes when approaching their dinner meals. This article will help you learn strategies to overcome these mistakes. Are you making these 11 mistakes? 1. Too Many Carbs Carbs aren’t bad for you, assuming you’re eating them in moderation and eating the right kind of carbs. It’s common to prepare a dinner meal with a heaping side of rice, bread or potatoes. We do it because it’s easy to cook and it’s incredibly filling – especially after a long, hard day. However consuming too many carbs can easily affect your blood sugar levels and can contribute to long-term medical complications such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It’s easy to overload on carbs. To put it into perspective, a ½ cup serving of pasta contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. Chances are you’re probably eating more than ½ cup of pasta at your meals. 2. Not Planning Ahead The busy lifestyles we lead have a negative impact on our food intake. Meal planning is essential for optimal diabetes care. Set aside some time once a week to plan meals for the upcoming week. Make your shopping list according to your meal plan and stick to that list. If you know what you’re going to have for dinner on Tuesday evening, you won’t get caught running through a fast food drive-thru or heating up high-carbohydrate frozen meals. For more interesting diabetes articles see below: 3. Carb-Loaded Beverages Milk, juices, soda pop, sports drinks, coffee drinks and energy drinks – all of these will work against your efforts for optimal glucose control. You will hear time and time again that water is the optimal beverage. It is calorie free an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: Love Carbs? 6 Steps To Avoid Diabetes

Diabetes Prevention: Love Carbs? 6 Steps To Avoid Diabetes

As a registered dietitian, I often hear, “I’ve never met a carbohydrate I didn’t like!” I can certainly understand the sentiment. Carbohydrates are everywhere, easily accessible, and made into tasty treats. At the same time, carbs can play a precarious role when it comes to diabetes, wreaking havoc on your blood sugar with potentially serious results. Without having to “break up with carbohydrates” as one of my clients put it, how can you avoid becoming diabetic or better control your blood sugars if you are diabetic? 1. Read labels or choose foods without labels. If you pick up an apple or some green beans you won’t find a label. Herein lies the clue that you are consuming a healthy, unprocessed form of carbohydrate. Fruits and vegetables have built in fiber that delays the absorption of their sugar. This prevents an insulin spike, followed by a drop, which creates cravings for more carbohydrates or food. If you choose a carbohydrate with a label, look at how many total carbohydrates are in a serving. The American Diabetes Association uses 15 grams of carbohydrate as one serving of carbohydrate. This is equal to a slice of bread. With this comparison, you can look at how many total carbohydrates are in a particular food, or how many slices of bread worth of carbohydrate you are consuming. For example, a typical container of juice can be marked for two servings with each serving having 35 grams of carbohydrate. That’s equivalent to more than four slices of bread — without the benefit of the fiber. 2. Squash it! Substitute veggies for starchy carbs. Most people can name the obvious starchy carbs — potatoes, rice, pasta, cereal, bread, etc. Even in a less processed, high fiber form (whole grain pastas, breads, etc.) they still contain significant amoun Continue reading >>

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