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Diabetes And Cancer Connection

The Diabetes-cancer Connection

The Diabetes-cancer Connection

National Diabetes Awareness Month brings attention to a disease that affects nearly 30 million Americans, with another 86 million Americans at risk for developing the disease. People with diabetes have an increased risk of heart attack or stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and nerve damage. Growing evidence also suggests that people with diabetes are at higher risk for developing certain cancers, including liver , pancreatic , endometrial , colorectal , breast and bladder . Both diabetes and cancer are thought to have an inflammatory cause at the cellular level. Uncontrolled blood sugar can lead to chronic inflammation, which may cause the types of changes in cells that can increase the risk of cancer, says Carolyn Lammersfeld , Vice President of Integrative Medicine at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA). Researchers found a link between insulin resistance and cancer risk, in which high levels of insulinassociated with type 2 diabetes and prediabetesmay stimulate tumor cell proliferation and growth. Researchers also pointed to the role of high body fat, or obesity, in causing an insulin resistant state. While more research is needed to better understand the complex relationship between diabetes and cancer, we do know that a dual diagnosis is relatively common. Its estimated that as many as one in five cancer patients has diabetes as well. We also know that cancer and diabetes share many of the same risk factors. While some are uncontrollable, like aging, others are lifestyle-related, including obesity, physical inactivity and poor diet. Lammersfeld offers ways to decrease your risk of developing either disease: Achieve and maintain a healthy body weight - If youre carrying extra weight, even small amounts of weight loss can be beneficial. The Diabetes Preventi Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-cancer Link

The Diabetes-cancer Link

Karen K. Collins, MS, RDN, CDN, is a consultant based in Bemus, N.Y., who serves as a nutrition advisor to the American Institute for Cancer Research. Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risks for several cancers, including colon, 1 postmenopausal breast, 2 pancreatic, 3 liver, 4 endometrial, 5 and bladder 6 cancers and non-Hodgkins lymphoma. 7 Type 2 diabetes is also linked to a modest decrease in the risk for prostate cancer. 8 However, diabetes does not reduce aggressive forms, and prostate cancer mortality rates are higher among men with diabetes. 9 , 10 Overall, increased cancer mortality associated with diabetes reflects both increased cancer incidence and decreased survival among people with diabetes who develop cancer. 11 13 Research is underway examining how antihyperglycemic medications may affect cancer risk and progression. Some evidence suggests that metformin may decrease risk, and researchers are exploring whether it might even play a role in the treatment of some cancers. 14 , 15 Mechanisms Linking Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer Normal cells develop into malignant cancer cells through a complex process, including initiation (DNA damage from a carcinogen or reactive molecule), promotion (stimulation of initiated cells growth), and progression (more aggressive growth with angiogenesis and metastasis). Most cancers develop over at least 1020 years. Numerous factors, including some related to metabolic states in overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, as well as dietary intake and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

When Michelle Hall was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, she was shocked. "The standing joke in the family was that I came from a long line of stocky French women who lived forever," says Hall, 62, of Salem, N.H. "We had no breast cancer in the family." Hall had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2001, so she would have special challenges while facing down cancer. As diseases, cancer and diabetes seem a world away from each other. Yet, numerous studies suggest the conditions are linked. People with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those without diabetes, but why remains unclear. Scientists are still trying to answer even the most basic questions: Does diabetes cause cancer? If so, what kinds of cancer and how? As the interplay between diabetes and cancer becomes clearer, researchers hope to gain an edge against both diseases. The link between diabetes and cancer may be partially explained by risk factors that underlie and raise the risk of both diseases. Sex: Overall, men are more likely to develop both cancer and type 2 diabetes than women. Weight: Overweight and obese people are more likely to develop cancer than lean people. The association between type 2 diabetes and weight is also well established. While it's clear that losing weight reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes, less is known about whether weight loss combats cancer. Diet: Eating patterns that are thought to help prevent and treat type 2 diabeteslimited red and processed meats and abundant vegetables, fruits, and whole grainsare also associated with a lower risk for many types of cancer. Exercise: Studies show that regular physical activity lowers the risk of developing several types of cancer. Likewise, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per day can reduce th Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: Whats The Link?

Diabetes And Cancer: Whats The Link?

The researchers suggested that the link between the two diseases may be partly due to shared risk factors, including aging, overweight and obesity, diet, physical activity, alcohol and smoking. But its also possible that diabetes could directly affect cancer risk through metabolic abnormalities. These include excess blood sugar, insulin resistance , and high levels of insulin and related factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which has been implicated in cancer. Chronic inflammation, which occurs in people with diabetes, may also contribute to elevated cancer risks. Some risk factors common to diabetes and cancer are modifiable; they include being overweight or obese, smoking, and lack of physical activity. Maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking, and being physically active are lifestyle measures that can reduce the risks of both diseases. The question of whether insulin and drugs taken by diabetic patients influences their risk of cancer has been raised, but the issue has not been settled. Meanwhile, the authors of the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society report said that cancer risk should not be a major factor in choosing diabetes therapy. The researchers added that patients with diabetes should be strongly encouraged to undergo appropriate cancer screenings as recommended for all people of their age and sex. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes and cancer are common diseases with tremendous impact on health worldwide. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at significantly higher risk for many forms of cancer. Type 2 diabetes and cancer share many risk factors, but potential biologic links between the two diseases are incompletely understood. Moreover, evidence from observational studies suggests that some medications used to treat hyperglycemia are associated with either increased or reduced risk of cancer. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society convened a consensus development conference in December 2009. Following a series of scientific presentations by experts in the field, the writing group independently developed this consensus report to address the following questions: Is there a meaningful association between diabetes and cancer incidence or prognosis? What risk factors are common to both diabetes and cancer? What are possible biologic links between diabetes and cancer risk? Do diabetes treatments influence risk of cancer or cancer prognosis? For each area, the authors were asked to address the current gaps in evidence and potential research and epidemiologic strategies for developing more definitive evidence in the future. Table 1 includes a summary of findings and recommendations. Recommendations in this report are solely the opinions of the authors and do not represent official position of the American Diabetes Association or the American Cancer Society. 1. Is there a meaningful association between diabetes and cancer incidence or prognosis? Both diabetes and cancer are prevalent diseases whose incidence is increasing globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of cancer has been difficult to establish because many areas do no Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Raise Cancer Risk?

Why Does Diabetes Raise Cancer Risk?

More Questions Than Answers From Expert Panel on Diabetes, Cancer Link June 16, 2010 -- People with diabetes are at increased risk of certain cancers -- but why? Could it be that some diabetes treatments trigger or promote cancer ? Or do the underlying causes of diabetes also underlie cancer ? These are the questions put before an expert panel from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society (ACS). Even so, lifestyle changes that prevent or reverse diabetes will certainly cut cancer risk, says panel member Susan M. Gapstur, PhD, ACS vice president of epidemiology. "The full biologic link between diabetes and cancer has not been completely defined," Gapstur tells WebMD. "But first of all we should prevent diabetes. Then we can prevent some cancers. And for those who do have diabetes, it should be controlled as much as possible through a healthy lifestyle." Diabetes doubles the risk of liver , pancreas , and endometrial cancer . It increases the risk of colorectal, breast , and bladder cancer by 20% to 50%. But it cuts men's risk of prostate cancer . People with diabetes tend to have some known risk factors for cancer: older age, obesity , poor diet, and physical inactivity. And problems common in diabetes -- too-high insulin levels, too-high blood sugar levels , and inflammation -- increase cancer risk. "No matter what science ultimately reveals ... we already know what we need to do to lower risk for both cancer and diabetes," Alice Bender, RD, of the American Institute for Cancer Research, says in a news release. "Eat a healthy, varied, predominantly plant-based diet, be physically active every day, and maintain a healthy body weight ." Do Diabetes Treatments Raise Cancer Risk? There is evidence, but not definitive proof, that diabetes treatments Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Colon Cancer: An Emerging Link

Diabetes And Colon Cancer: An Emerging Link

More than 25 million adults aged 20 and older in the United States have diabetes. That figure has more than tripled since 1980. That is bad news for a number of reasons. Not only can diabetes cause heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and eye issues, but recent research now shows there is also a clear link between type 2 diabetes and colon cancer. Colon cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, yet it is still the third most common cancer among both men and women in the U.S. And, many of the ways people can lower their risk for colon cancer are actually the same as how they can avoid developing type 2 diabetes. These include: Staying away from a diet high in red and processed meats Keeping physically active Maintaining a healthy weight Staying away from tobacco Avoiding heavy alcohol use Even though the two diseases share several common risk factors, research shows that type 2 diabetes itself is indeed linked to increased risk of developing colon cancer. Studies also show that among patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, those with diabetes were more likely than those without it to die – even after controlling for other factors such as disease stage, body weight, and smoking habits. There are a few major hypotheses for the link, according to Peter Campbell, Ph.D., an American Cancer Society researcher who has been studying the connection between diabetes and colon cancer for a number of years. One idea has to do with a condition that causes the amount of insulin in a person’s blood to be higher than normal, called hyperinsulinemia. Insulin is the body’s way of regulating the amount of sugar – or glucose – in the blood. Hyperinsulinemia can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. The thought, says Campbell, is that the abnormally high level Continue reading >>

The Diabetes And Cancer Connection

The Diabetes And Cancer Connection

Diabetic Living / Complications / Other Diabetes can increase your risks for certain cancers. Learn the actions to take now to protect your health. After 20 years of living with type 2 diabetes and a long struggle with her weight, Leila Berner got the diagnosis everyone fears: cancer. Leila, a 63-year-old rabbi who lives near Washington, D.C., never connected her diabetes and breast cancer until her doctors advised that she lose weight and get active for long-term survival. She also underwent a lumpectomy, radiation, and chemotherapy following her 2010 diagnosis. Diabetes and cancer are close cousins, and diabetes is often the first to show up. Researchers have amassed a large knowledge base on the link between diabetes and cancer, says Lesley Fels Tinker, Ph.D., RD, principal staff scientist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Though questions remain, experts are sure there are several things you can do today to reduce your cancer risks. According to a 2010 consensus report published jointly by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), the risk of a person with type 2 diabetes developing cancer is 20-50 percent higher than a person without diabetes. Research also indicates that people with type 2 diabetes who develop cancer may experience a shorter life expectancy. That's mainly because of their existing risk or presence of heart disease and/or because many cancer treatments can harm the heart and circulatory system. Being overweight increases the odds of cancer reoccurrence. With diabetes and cancer on the rise and already the second and seventh leading causes, respectively, of death in the United States, health experts are sounding the alarm. "When people gain excess weight, they unlock a cascade of metabolic ch Continue reading >>

Cancer And Diabetes: More Connections Than You Think

Cancer And Diabetes: More Connections Than You Think

Cancer and Diabetes: More Connections Than You Think Many people struggle with both diabetes and cancer at the same time. As youve probably heard by now, City of Hope recently announced its goal to cure type 1 diabetes within six years, made possible in part through a generous gift from the Wanek family. Theannouncement raises a natural question: Why should City of Hope, a renowned cancer center, devote so much time, effort and resources to the study and treatment of diabetes? Aren't they very different diseases? To begin with, a great many people struggle with both diabetes and cancer at the same time. People with type 2 diabetes (the most common form) are twice as likely to develop liver or pancreatic cancer. They also run a higher-than-normal risk of developing colon, bladder and breast cancer. Diabetic women with breast cancer have a higher mortality rate than women with breast cancer alone. (Oddly, diabetic men run a lower risk of developing prostate cancer.) Ever-growing research strongly suggests that none of this is random or coincidental. Rather, it's clear that, from biology to risk factors to treatment options, cancer and diabetes are intimately related in many ways. Cancer and diabetes are two sides of the same coin, asserted DebbieThurmond,Ph.D. , Chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology at CityofHope'sDiabetes&MetabolismResearchInstitute . They are disruptions of the body's normal metabolism. That may help explain why obesity is a major risk factor for both diseases. Excess fat may begin that disruption process, as well as increase inflammation, a known trigger for diabetes as well as cancer. Fat deposits located around internal organs secrete chemicals and send signals which make cells more aggressive, initiating tumor growth, whil Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes And Cancer

Tweet Studies have shown that diabetes carries an increased risk for a number of different forms of cancer. Having cancer with diabetes can make achieving good diabetes control much more difficult but this can be relieved to some extent. How is type 2 diabetes linked with cancer? One theory for why a link may exist is that high levels of circulating insulin (known as hyperinsulinemia) can promote the growth of tumours. In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance commonly causes the body to produce more insulin than normal. Another reason why a link may be present is where a harmful lifestyle may lead to obesity and therefore higher risks of both type 2 diabetes and cancer. Cancer and type 2 diabetes The risks of contracting the following cancers are shown to be doubled by the presence of type 2 diabetes: Pancreatic cancer Endometrial cancer (also known as womb cancer) A smaller increased risk, of 20% to 50% is seen for the following forms of cancer. Colorectal cancer Bladder cancer Blood cancers (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma) The one positive is that incidences of prostate cancer are actually lower for people with type 2 diabetes. Cancer and type 1 diabetes Links between type 1 diabetes and cancer are not so well recorded but it appears there is also an increase in risk of cancers for people with type 1 diabetes. The cancers with the highest increase in risk tended to be different to those noted in type 2 diabetes. The cancers with increased risk in type 1 diabetes include: Stomach cancer Cervical cancer What are the symptoms of cancer? The symptoms of cancer vary widely depending on which part of the body the cancer strikes. What treatment options are open for cancer? The main treatment options for cancer are surgery to remove the cancers or radiotherapy (also known as radiatio Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: An Alarming Emerging Link

Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: An Alarming Emerging Link

Home / Type 2 Diabetes / Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer: An Alarming Emerging Link Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer: An Alarming Emerging Link Type 2 diabetes can cause a number of health complications that decrease thelife expectancy of patients. Apart from causing heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney disease and eye problems, research also shows that there is a connection between type 2 diabetes and cancer. For more than 50 years, physicians have been reporting cases of cancer occurring in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the data had been inconclusive when it comes to pointing to a connection between the two conditions. In the 1960s, large population studies finally found that risks of cancer increased for people with type 2 diabetes. While relative risks imparted by diabetes for cancers of the liver and pancreas were twofold or more, the relative risks of colorectal, breast and bladder cancers were slightly lesser (1.2 to 1.5 fold.) 4 Factors That Increase The Risk of Cancer with Type 2 Diabetes While insulin is vital for glucose metabolism, more of it can be harmful to the body. Hyperinsulinemia (either due to excessive production of insulin by the body or due to injected insulin) is the root cause of increased risk of cancer among diabetics. For insulin to function as a messenger, it needs to bind to specific receptors on target cells. These receptors are present on a variety of cells. Large amounts of insulin will activate a far greater number of receptors than it should normally do. This excessive binding can create a chain of events that may lead to the cell becoming cancerous. Reduced Production of IGF-Binding Protein There is another theory that explains why hyperinsulinemia causes cancer. There is a protein in the body called Insulin-like Growth Factor Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer Most people wouldn't think diabetes and cancer have anything to do with each other. But a group of experts from the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association thinks they do. A consensus statement from that panel says there's accumulating evidence that people with diabetes are, in fact, more prone to certain cancers. The analysis is published in the latest CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. It turns out that diabetics are twice as likely to get cancer of the liver, pancreas and uterine lining. Their risk of colon, breast and bladder cancer is 20 to 50 percent higher than non-diabetics'. There doesn't seem to be any higher risk for others, such as lung cancer. And the risk of prostate cancer is actually lower among diabetics. Doctors have noticed since the 1950s that their diabetic patients seem to get cancer more often than usual. But it wasn't until last year that researchers pulled together data from various studies and found an association. Also last year, several epidemiology studies got a lot of attention when they suggested that a synthetic long-acting insulin called glargine seems to increase the risk of cancer. But that's still highly debatable. Other studies indicate that metformin , the most common drug for Type 2 diabetes, may actually reduce the risk of getting cancer or dying from it. And just how might diabetes increase the risk of cancer? On that point there's only speculation. Here are some possibilities: Shared risk factors: Both cancer and diabetes become more common as people age; gain weight; eat diets poor in fruits, vegetables and whole-grain cereals; or smoke. Men have higher risk of both diabetes and cancer. Off-kilter metabolism: Many Continue reading >>

The Cancer-diabetes Connection

The Cancer-diabetes Connection

Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. In 2015, 30.3 million Americans had diabetes.1 Of these, 7.2 million had not received a diagnosis.1 About 1.5 million new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States.1 In addition, 84.1 million US adults had prediabetes.1 We are all familiar with the comorbidities associated with diabetes, such as amputations, diabetic retinopathy, heart disease, nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy. But is there a correlation between diabetes and cancer? If there is, imagine the far-reaching effects that this association can have, given the growing number of patients with diabetes. Epidemiologic studies have found a definitive relationship between cancer and diabetes. These studies have presented evidence that the causal factor may be a single factor or a combination of factors. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can double the risk of contracting endometrial, liver, and pancreatic cancers.2,3 In addition, T2D can increase the risk of bladder, breast, blood (eg, non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and colorectal cancers by 20% to 50%.2 However, the risk of prostate cancer in men with T2D is decreased.2 Type 1 diabetes can increase the risk of stomach cancer and cervical cancer,2 in addition to the same cancers as T2D, though to a lesser extent.2 Common risk factors for both cancer and diabetes fall into 1 of 3 categories but may also overlap. The categories are modifiable risk factors, non-modifiable risk factors, and biological links. Modifiable risk factors include alcohol and tobacco use, diet, physical activity, and weight. Overweight or obese individuals have a higher risk of several types of cancers compared with people whose body mass index is within the normal range.4 The cancers consistently associated with overweight or obe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: American Diabetes Association

Diabetes And Cancer: American Diabetes Association

Researchers are trying to learn more about the link between type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Type 2 diabetes and certain cancers share some risk factors: Age As you get older, your risk for both type 2 diabetes and cancer goes up. Gender Overall, cancer occurs more often in men. Men also have a slightly higher risk of diabetes than women. Race/ethnicity African Americans and non-Hispanic whites are more likely to develop cancer. African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Overweight Being overweight can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Inactivity Higher physical activity levels lower the risk of type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Smoking Smoking is linked to several types of cancer. Studies suggest that smoking is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Drinking more than one drink a day for women or two drinks a day for men raises the risk for both diabetes and cancer. Lose weight If you are overweight, even losing 7% of your weight (15 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds) can make a big difference. Use the Body Mass Index (BMI) Calculator to find out how much weight you need to lose. Eat healthy Choose a diet with plenty of: Fresh vegetables The best choices are fresh, frozen, and canned vegetables and vegetable juices without added sodium, fat, or sugar. For good health, try to eat at least 3-5 daily servings of vegetables, including asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, eggplant, greens, peppers, snap peas and tomatoes. A serving of vegetables is cup of cooked vegetables or vegetable juice; or 1 cup of raw vegetables. Whole grains A whole grain is the entire grain, which includes Continue reading >>

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