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Diabetes And Calling In Sick

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Diabetes: How to Create a Sick-Day Plan If you have diabetes, many other illnesses or stresses on your body can make your blood sugar go up. This can be dangerous. When you are sick with the flu or another illness, your body releases hormones to fight infection. These hormones raise blood sugar levels and make it hard for insulin or other medicines to lower your blood sugar. Work with your doctor to write up a sick-day plan for what to do on days when you are sick. Learn what your blood sugar should be and how you should adjust your insulin or pills if you need to. Call your doctor if you have trouble checking your blood sugar or checking for ketones. Keep your plan in a handy place, and include contact numbers in case you need to reach your doctor at night or on the weekends. Let your family know where you keep the plan. What should you do if you get sick? Take diabetes medicines as usual • If you cannot eat or drink, or are having trouble eating or drinking, talk to your doctor. • Your blood sugar may go up because of your illness. If you are vomiting and cannot take your medicine, call your doctor. You may need to adjust your medicines. • Write down the diabetes medicines you have been taking and whether you have changed the dose based on your sick-day plan. You can give this information to your doctor if you need to call. Eat and drink • Eat your normal types and amounts of food. Drink extra fluids to prevent dehydration. Ask your doctor about how much and how often you should eat and drink when you are sick. ◦ If your blood sugar level is higher than the blood sugar level your doctor recommends (for example, 240 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL]), drink extra liquids that do not contain sugar, such as water or sugar-free cola. ◦ I Continue reading >>

Sick Day Plan

Sick Day Plan

Diabetes and Illness Illness or injury can make managing your diabetes more difficult. When you are sick your body is in a state of stress and produces stress hormones. These hormones help your body fight the illness or injury, but they also cause your blood sugar to increase. Your blood sugar can increase when you are sick even if you are unable to eat or drink. Untreated high blood sugar can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) or Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Syndrome (HHS). DKA and HHS are health emergencies and require treatment in the hospital. These problems can be avoided by having a sick day plan which you should develop with your doctor. Illness and Blood Sugar Control Just about any type of illness can make controlling your blood sugar more difficult including: Colds Stomach bugs that cause vomiting and diarrhea Infections of the ear, sinuses, throat, teeth or bladder Pneumonia Infected sores including those on the feet Sick Day Tips Always take your long acting insulin. Generally, you will need more insulin when you are sick. Your doctor will decide how much insulin you will need to take while sick or if you should continue your diabetes pills. If you are taking a type of diabetic pill called an insulin secretagogue such as glyburide, glipizide, glimepiride replaglinide or nateglinide and are unable to keep food down-call your doctor to decide if you should take it. Check your blood sugar every 2 to 4 hours. Urine should be checked for ketones if your blood sugar is above 240 or you have been vomiting or having diarrhea. Discuss with your doctor any other instructions that are specific to your condition. Frequently Asked Questions When should I call the doctor? Call if you have been sick for 24 hours or more Your temperature is greater than 101.5 degrees You hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Workplace - Diabetics Perceptions And Experiences Of Managing Their Disease At Work: A Qualitative Study

Diabetes In The Workplace - Diabetics Perceptions And Experiences Of Managing Their Disease At Work: A Qualitative Study

Diabetes in the workplace - diabetics perceptions and experiences of managing their disease at work: a qualitative study 1Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Canterbury Christ Church University, Medway Campus, Cathedral Court, 30 Pembroke Court, Chatham Maritime, Kent, ME4 4UF, UK 1Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Canterbury Christ Church University, Medway Campus, Cathedral Court, 30 Pembroke Court, Chatham Maritime, Kent, ME4 4UF, UK 1Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Canterbury Christ Church University, Medway Campus, Cathedral Court, 30 Pembroke Court, Chatham Maritime, Kent, ME4 4UF, UK 22 Thames Ave, Rainham, Gillingham, Kent, ME8 9BW, UK Received 2012 Apr 27; Accepted 2013 Apr 15. Copyright 2013 Ruston et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes represents one of the biggest public health challenges facing the UK. It is also associated with increasing costs to the economy due to working days lost as people with diabetes have a sickness absence rate 23 times greater than the general population. Workplaces have the potential to support or hinder self- management of diabetes but little research has been undertaken to examine the relationship between work and diabetes in the UK. This paper seeks to go some way to addressing this gap by exploring the perceptions and experiences of employees with diabetes. Forty three people with diabetes were purposivel Continue reading >>

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Whether your head feels like it's stuffed with cotton because you have a cold or you're spending a lot of time on the toilet because of a stomach bug, being sick is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, being sick can also affect blood sugar levels. The good news is that taking a few extra precautions can help you keep your blood sugar levels under control. When you get sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. Some illnesses cause the opposite problem, though. If you don't feel like eating or have nausea or vomiting, and you're taking the same amount of insulin you normally do, you can develop blood sugar levels that are too low. Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable when you're sick. Because you can't be sure how the illness will affect your blood sugar levels, it's important to check blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust your insulin doses as needed. Your diabetes management plan will help you know what to do when you're sick. The plan might tell you: how to monitor your blood glucose levels and ketones when you're sick what changes you might make to your food and drink and diabetes medications In addition, people with diabetes should get the pneumococcal vaccine, which protects against some serious infections. You should also get a flu shot every year. These vaccines may help you keep your diabetes under better control and cut down on the number of sick d Continue reading >>

How Do I Manage My Blood Sugar When I’m Sick?

How Do I Manage My Blood Sugar When I’m Sick?

When you have diabetes, sick days often mean more than a runny nose and sneezing. An illness like a cold, the flu, or any condition that makes you throw up or gives you diarrhea can also boost your blood sugar. So can an infection. That means you have to stay on top of your blood sugar levels. Here are some guidelines: Check your blood sugar every 4 hours. Test for ketones if you have type 1 diabetes and your sugar level is above 240mg/dL -- or if your doctor tells you to. Ketones are a form of waste that people with type 1 make when they’re under stress (like an illness). Call the doctor if you find ketones in your urine. Depending on how sick you are, he may suggest you go to the emergency room. Check your temperature regularly. Drink liquids if you can’t keep solid food down. Have one cup of liquid every hour while you’re awake to prevent dehydration. If you can’t hold down liquids, you may need to go to the emergency room or hospital. Don’t stop taking insulin, even if you can’t eat solid food. You may need to eat or drink something with sugar so that your blood sugar doesn't drop too low. You may need to stop taking medicines by mouth for type 2 diabetes while you’re sick. Check with your doctor if you’re not sure what to do. If you need an over-the-counter drug to control symptoms like cough and nasal congestion, ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of sugar-free products. Eat or drink 30 to 50 grams of carbohydrates every 3 to 4 hours. That will keep your body nourished, stop if from making ketones, and prevent your blood sugar from dropping too low. If you’re having trouble eating, try bland foods like the ones listed below. Each equals one carbohydrate choice. 1/2 cup regular gelatin 1/2 cup regular soft drink, like 7-up or Sprite 1/2 Pops Continue reading >>

Sick-day Guidelines For People With Diabetes

Sick-day Guidelines For People With Diabetes

When you are sick, your body reacts by releasing hormones to fight infection. But these hormones raise blood sugar levels and at the same time make it more difficult for insulin to lower blood sugar. When you have diabetes , even a minor illness can lead to dangerously high blood sugar. This may cause life-threatening complications, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or a hyperosmolar state . Work with your doctor or diabetes educator to make a sick-day plan for you or your child who has diabetes. Discuss your target blood sugar goal during an illness, how you should adjust your insulin dose and timing (if you take insulin), and when you need to contact your doctor for help. Also, make sure you know how often to check your blood sugar and your ketone levels. Keep your plan in a convenient place, and include contact information in case you need to reach your doctor at night or on the weekends. Here are some general sick-day guidelines: Continue taking your diabetes medicine even if you are vomiting and having trouble eating or drinking. Your blood sugar may continue to rise because of your illness. If you cannot take your medicines, call your doctor and discuss whether you need to adjust your insulin dose or other medicine. Try to eat your normal types and amounts of food and to drink extra fluids. Ask your doctor how often and how much you should eat and drink when you are sick. If your blood sugar level is higher than the blood sugar level your doctor recommends, for example, 240 mg/dL, drink extra liquids that do not contain sugar, such as water or sugar-free cola. If you cannot eat the foods in your regular diet, a general guideline is to try to eat or drink 50 grams (g) of carbohydrate every 3 to 4 hours. Your doctor may suggest more or less carbohydrate. Some ideas inc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Work

Diabetes And Your Work

Diabetes and work don’t always mix. How do you manage food, medicines, rest, monitoring, exercise, and work, especially if you’ve got demands, deadlines, and a boss who’s sweating you? How do you deal with the stress? I asked my son’s 22-year-old friend Don, who was diagnosed with Type 1 in 2008, about his data input job. “Don’t even ask,” he said. “On weekends, I can eat like I’m supposed to. I can test when I need to, exercise if I want to. That’s hard enough. But at work? I don’t think so. We get one lunch break of 35 minutes. We’re supposed to get coffee breaks, but nobody takes them. We’re too busy, so we stay at our desks and type.” I asked Don if he knew about employment law requiring employers to make “reasonable accommodations” for illness and disability, including time to monitor and a private place to do it. “I’ve heard of stuff like that,” he said. “The boss tells me I can test if I really need to, but he says things like ‘don’t take advantage of my good nature.’ I’ve only had the job six months and don’t want to [antagonize] him.” Don may be right to worry. According to the American Diabetes Association, anti-diabetes discrimination at work is a major problem. According to this ADA Web page, “For workers with diabetes, employment discrimination can take many forms, but typically includes a failure to hire or promote you because of your diabetes, termination due to your diabetes, or a failure to provide you with reasonable accommodations that help you do your job.” But worse than discrimination may be a work environment’s direct effects on your health. Work can be a major source of stress, which we know increases insulin resistance and blood pressure. Work stress can lead to consuming unhealthy food, Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

When we're stressed, our bodies need extra energy to help us cope and recover. This is true whether bodies are under stress from illness or injury or are dealing with the effects of emotional stress, both good and bad. To meet the demand for more energy, the body responds by releasing into the bloodstream sugar that's been stored in the liver, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In someone without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the rise in blood sugar by releasing enough insulin into the bloodstream to help convert the sugar into energy. This brings blood sugar levels back down to normal. In someone with diabetes, the extra demand usually means needing to take more diabetes medicine (insulin or pills.) To make sure your body is getting enough medicine to help keep your blood sugar levels close to normal, you'll need to test more often when you are: Sick Recovering from surgery Fighting an infection Feeling upset Under more stress than usual Traveling Type 1 Diabetes In people with type 1 diabetes, blood sugar levels rise in response to stress, but the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat to meet energy needs. When fat is burned for energy, it creates waste products called ketones. As fat is broken down, ketones start to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a person to lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. Type 2 Diabetes In people with type 2 diabetes, the body usually has enough insulin available to turn sugar into energy, so it doesn't need to burn fat. However, stress hormones can cause blood sugar levels to rise to very high and even dangerous levels. People with type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes: When To Call The Doctor

Diabetes: When To Call The Doctor

Part of caring for a child with diabetes is knowing when to get medical help. As you gain experience in helping your child manage diabetes, you'll become more confident about how to handle all kinds of health issues. Whether your child has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the diabetes management plan provides instructions about what to do when your child is sick, hurt, or having a diabetes problem. Who you'll call for help willdepend on a variety of things, like the symptoms and their severity. For most medical problems, you should first call your child's primary care doctor, such as a pediatrician or family doctor. Whether you need to ask a question or make an appointment, the doctor can advise you. In some cases, however, the diabetes management plan might direct you to other members of the diabetes health care team, such as a pediatric endocrinologist , nurse, or certified diabetes educator . If you think the situation is an emergency, call 911 or take your child to the emergency department. But first give emergency treatments as you've been instructed such asgiving a glucagon injection for a severe low blood sugar reaction before calling the doctoror rushing to the emergency department. When you call, you might be asked about your child's: medicines (and your pharmacist's phone number) diabetes health care team's contact information If your child is ill (especially with afever, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea) or has a problem eating or drinking, call your doctor. Also notify the doctor and other members of the diabetes health care team if your child: has had a significant injury (more than a minor cut, scrape, or bump) needs surgery (especially if it interferes with eating or involves anesthesia or sedation) has been prescribed new medicines (some can affect blood glucose Continue reading >>

In The Spotlight: Handling Sick Days With Type 1 Diabetes

In The Spotlight: Handling Sick Days With Type 1 Diabetes

Just when you thought you had this whole blood sugar management thing down, along comes a cold, flu, or some other common bug. Not quite sure what to do when your child is sick? From blood sugar-friendly foods that will stay down with an upset tummy to managing unpredictable highs and lows, here are some T1D sick-day tips. Dos & Don’ts When a child becomes ill, stress hormones released by the body can interfere with insulin. In a child without diabetes, the body can simply produce more insulin to compensate, but when a child has type 1, being sick often results in high blood sugar readings that require correction. How out-of-range can you expect your child’s numbers to go? There’s really no way to predict, according to Kathy O’Malley, R.N., B.S.N., C.D.E., a certified diabetes educator at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., who explains, “Blood sugars may vary depending on the type of illness and the severity.” Numbers may also fluctuate suddenly, which is why O’Malley’s first piece of advice for parents with a sick child is to check blood sugars more frequently and treat highs (and lows) as needed. Also on her sick-day to-do list: test urine more frequently for ketones. When these chemical compounds start building up in the blood, it’s a sign that the body is using fat and muscle for energy. Ketones are often present when blood sugar readings are high; elevated ketones typically mean that a child with type 1 is not getting enough insulin. Very high levels of ketones can be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a health complication that requires immediate medical attention. “When a child is sick, ketones should be checked with each [urine] void,” says O’Malley’s colleague, Kevin Corley, M.D., staff endocrinologist at Childr Continue reading >>

Employer Giving Very Hard Time About Diabetes

Employer Giving Very Hard Time About Diabetes

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Employer giving very hard time about Diabetes Hope everyone is well. Need a bit of advice / moral support. My employer is constantly giving me a very hard time about my condition - type 1 diabetes. The condition effects my attendance (I take about 10 days sick per year) and occasional unstable blood sugar levels effect my job performance. My employer is putting more and more pressure on me to improve my health and, despite numerous discussions, seems to believe that all my ill's can be remedied. My poor attendance record has already led to me being held back (in terms of being given additional responsibility) and being given reduced bonuses etc. Where do I stand and what can I do about this? Any advice would be gratefully received. I am bumping your post up in the hope that a Type1 will reply. what is it that causes you to take ave 10 days sick a year? I don't know what is normal for a T1, but myself, I have never been off sick sue to my T1 diabetes, although, perhaps, in the past 15 years, I have been late once or twice when I have had to get my BG up so I can drive. I am not sure your employer is doing anything wrong, I assume he does not stand in the way of you diabetes control...not letting you test, or treat hypos etc? if they do, then this is an entirely different matter! Obviously, some of this is dependent on what it is you do for a living. Could you explain what is wrong with you on your sick days? Are you hypo, or recovering from a hypo, is your BG too high, and you feel rubbish because of it? Or is it because of diabetes complications? I am afraid it is people like me who may be part of your problem. T1s, who are lucky enough not to need ti Continue reading >>

Tips For When Diabetes Makes You Call In Sick To... | Diabetic Connect

Tips For When Diabetes Makes You Call In Sick To... | Diabetic Connect

The alarm clock goes off and as youre hitting that snooze button for the first time, you also realize the day is going to be a bad one. In fact, so bad that you dont think you are going to be able to function at work today. Just like that day last week when you called out sick. Or was it two days last week? An occasional sick day or two, or a mental health day, is one thing. But what if your chronic condition results in frequent sick days? Making that call might leave you feeling embarrassed. Or fearing how the news will be received by your boss. Or maybe concerned that you will be stigmatized in some way by your coworkers. But on the other hand, youre sick and you simply cant make it into work. So how do you handle these conversations? First, be proactive. Let your manager know you may need to take sick days and why, in as much or as little detail as you are comfortable with. Occasional, and especially frequent, absences shouldnt be a surprise. Bosses dont like surprises. Something like, I have a chronic condition. I have good days and I have some bad days. I just need for you to know that I may not be able to come into work on the bad days. Discuss the options. Involve your boss in strategizing on how to best manage workload on the days you may not be at work. Brainstorm together. Half day, work at home, or other accommodations. Keep it positive. I know you are counting on me and I want to be as productive as possible. So when I am having a bad day, I would like to talk to you about how I can try to avoid leaving you shorthanded. Notice try to avoid, not promise to avoid. You cant control everything. Assess the fallout. After an absence especially if you have had more than one recent absence you may have some fences to mend. This might include initiating a discussion Continue reading >>

Managing Your Child's Diabetes On Sick Days

Managing Your Child's Diabetes On Sick Days

Managing Your Child's Diabetes on Sick Days KidsHealth / For Parents / Managing Your Child's Diabetes on Sick Days en espaolControlar la diabetes de su hijo cuando est enfermo Kids with diabetes get sick once in a while, just like other kids. However, because the effects of illness on the body can raise or lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, a few extra precautions are needed to keep blood sugar levels under control. With proper planning and some advice from your doctor, you'll be prepared to handle sick days with confidence. When your child gets sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. While stress tends to make blood sugar rise in people with diabetes, some illnesses cause loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting. The poor intake of food in such cases can result in low blood sugar levels in someone taking the usual doses of insulin . In a nutshell: Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable on sick days. Because you can't be sure exactly how the illness will affect your child's diabetes control, it's important to check your child's blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust insulin doses as needed. Your child's diabetes health care team will include sick-day instructions in the diabetes management plan, which might include: how to monitor both blood sugar levels and ketones when your child is sick which over-the-counter and prescription medicines are OK to give Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Workplace Rights

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Workplace Rights

Living with type 2 diabetes is hard enough. But what if your condition affects your work or the way people treat you there? Learn about your employment rights as someone with diabetes. Diabetes is considered a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This law applies to any employer in the United States that has 15 employees or more. It also applies to: labor organizations joint labor-management committees employment agencies all state and local government employers If you’re employed by or applying for a job with one of these organizations, the ADA protects you from discrimination. An employer can’t refuse to hire you based solely on your diabetes. In fact, you don’t even have a legal obligation to tell a prospective employer about your condition. Once you’ve been hired, the ADA also requires your employer to provide reasonable accommodations. These include changes to your workplace or routine that can help you to manage your condition. You may also be protected under the Rehabilitation Act if you’re federally employed. Depending on where you live, additional state laws may cover smaller employers or offer broader protections. In most cases, an employer can’t use your diabetes as a reason: not to hire you not to promote you to fire you The only exception is if your condition poses a direct threat to your health or safety or those of others. For example, do you frequently experience hypoglycemic episodes that could interfere with your duties? These episodes might incapacitate you while you’re operating heavy machinery. This could put your life at risk. In this case, an employer has the right not to hire you for a role that requires you to operate that machinery. Once you’ve received a job offer, you’re subject to the same medical req Continue reading >>

Diabetes - When You Are Sick

Diabetes - When You Are Sick

Check your blood sugar more often than usual (every 2 to 4 hours). Try to keep your blood sugar at less than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L). There may be times when you need to check your blood sugar every hour. Write down all your blood sugar levels, the time of each test, and the medicines you have taken. If you have type 1 diabetes, check your urine ketones every time you urinate. Eat small meals often. Even if you are not eating as much, your blood sugar can still get very high. If you use insulin, you may even need extra insulin injections. DO NOT do vigorous exercise when you are sick. If you take insulin, you should also have a glucagon emergency treatment kit prescribed by your doctor. Always have this kit available. Drink plenty of sugar-free fluids to keep your body from getting dried out (dehydrated). Drink at least twelve 8-ounce (oz) cups (3 liters) of fluid a day. Fluids you can drink if you are dehydrated include: Water Club soda Diet soda (caffeine-free) Tomato juice Chicken broth If your blood sugar is less than 100 mg/dL (5.5 mmol/L) or falling quickly, it is OK to drink fluids that have sugar in them. Try to check their effect on your blood sugar in the same way you check how other foods affect your blood sugar. Fluids you can drink if your blood sugar is low include: Apple juice Orange juice Grapefruit juice Gatorade or other sports drink Tea with honey Lemon-lime drinks Ginger ale If you throw up, DO NOT drink or eat anything for 1 hour. Rest, but DO NOT lie flat. After 1 hour, take sips of soda, such as ginger ale, every 10 minutes. If vomiting persists call or see your provider. When you have an upset stomach, try to eat small meals. Try carbohydrates, such as: Bagels or bread Cooked cereal Mashed potatoes Noodle or rice soup Saltines Gelatin (such as Je Continue reading >>

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