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Diabetes And Caffiene

Caffeine Raises Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics

Caffeine Raises Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics

It may come as quite a shock to those type 2 diabetics who regularly consume caffeine to hear that studies are now showing that caffeine raises blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics. Are you trying to maintain healthy blood sugar levels naturally? Sugar Crush products are all natural and organic dietary supplements backed by clinical research to manage your blood sugar levels. Click here to read more. I’m a regular diet coke drinker and I thought that because there is no sugar in diet coke it was safe for me to drink regularly…I was wrong. The American Diabetes Association announced the findings of a Duke University study which showed that caffeine raised the blood glucose levels of type 2 diabetics throughout the day and especially after meals. But I thought caffeine was ok for diabetics? Previous studies on the link between caffeine and diabetes had shown that caffeine consumption lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes. Those who drank the most caffeine were the least likely to develop type 2 diabetes. It was these finding that may have lead to the misconception that caffeine had no ill effect on diabetics. What the Duke University study is now showing is that in people who have type 2 diabetes, caffeine raised their blood sugar levels throughout the day. So even if they drank caffeine in the morning it had an effect on their blood sugar level throughout the entire day making it difficult to keep it under control. So what is suggested? Well, if you are a type 2 diabetic such as myself, and you are finding it difficult to keep your blood glucose levels in the normal range you may want to examine the amount of caffeine you are consuming. Like I said, I am a diet coke drinker. This is the source of any caffeine that I consume. I have been having a hard time controlling Continue reading >>

Caffeine Linked To Lower Risk Of Death In Women With Diabetes

Caffeine Linked To Lower Risk Of Death In Women With Diabetes

Women with diabetes who regularly drink caffeinated coffee or tea may live longer than those who don't consume caffeine at all, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal (11-15 September). No association was found for men with diabetes. This observational study found that the more caffeine women consumed the lower their risk of dying compared to those who never consumed caffeine. Importantly, the protective effect depended on the source of the caffeine: higher levels of caffeine consumption from coffee were associated with a reduced risk of death from any cause, particularly from cardiovascular disease; while women who consumed more caffeine from tea were less likely to die from cancer. More than 80% of the world's adult population consume caffeine daily, mostly from coffee and tea. Average daily coffee consumption is between 100 mg and 300 mg per day, depending on age and country. The mean in the USA, for example, is 165 mg per day. Many studies have shown a beneficial effect of drinking coffee on the risk of death from all causes in the general population, but little is known about the role of caffeine on mortality in people with diabetes. In this study, a group of medical residents from various institutions in Portugal (Dr. João Sérgio Neves and Professor Davide Carvalho from the University of Porto and colleagues across Portugal examined the association between varying levels of caffeine intake and mortality in over 3,000 men and women with diabetes from the 1999 to 2010 National Health Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)--a study tracking the health and nutritional status of a nationally representative sample of adults in the USA since 1971. Participants repo Continue reading >>

Caffeine’s Benefits In Women With Diabetes

Caffeine’s Benefits In Women With Diabetes

As we’ve discussed in the past here at Diabetes Flashpoints, drinking coffee and tea has long been shown to have diabetes-related benefits — including both helping to prevent the condition and improving blood glucose control in people with diabetes. It’s sometimes unclear, though, exactly who benefits the most from drinking coffee and tea, and how much any benefit is due to caffeine or other substances found in these beverages. A recent study has stumbled on a surprising result: only women with diabetes seem to live longer as a result of caffeine consumption. Presented last month at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, the study looked at over 3,000 men and women with diabetes who took part in the U.S. National Health Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2010. As part of the study, caffeine intake from coffee, tea, and soft drinks was recorded through structured interviews. As noted in an article on the study at Medical News Today, 618 participants died over the 11-year follow-up period. When comparing caffeine intake with participants’ risk of dying, the researchers found that there was no pattern among men. But among women, consuming up to 100 milligrams of caffeine daily reduced the overall risk of dying by 51%. Consuming more than 200 milligrams daily had an even greater effect, reducing the death risk by 66%. This lower death risk, though, was based on different benefits depending on whether the women drank coffee or tea. Tea had the greatest effect on cancer-related mortality, with women who consumed the most caffeine from tea 80% less likely to die of cancer than those who got no caffeine from tea. Coffee, on the other hand, appeared to be related to overall and cardiovascular-dise Continue reading >>

Caffeine Ups Blood Sugar Level In Diabetics: Study

Caffeine Ups Blood Sugar Level In Diabetics: Study

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Cutting down on caffeine could help people with the most common form of diabetes better control their blood sugar levels, researchers said on Monday. Giving caffeine to a small group of people with type 2 diabetes caused their levels of the blood sugar glucose to rise through the day, especially after meals, researchers at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, found. “Caffeine appears to disrupt glucose metabolism in a way that could be harmful to people with type-2 diabetes,” James Lane, a Duke medical psychologist who led the study, said in a telephone interview. Caffeine is found in coffee, tea and many soft drinks. Diabetes is a condition in which one’s blood glucose levels are too high. Having too much glucose in the blood can damage the eyes, kidneys and nerves, and diabetes can also lead to heart disease, stroke and limb amputations. Type-2 diabetes is the form closely linked to obesity. The new findings seem to run counter to previous research regarding diabetes and caffeine. Earlier studies indicated that people who drank coffee had a reduced risk of type-2 diabetes, and those who drank the most coffee had the lowest risk. The researchers used new technology -- a tiny glucose monitor embedded under the abdominal skin -- to monitor the glucose levels continuously in 10 people, average age 63. On days when the participants were given four tablets containing caffeine equivalent to four cups of coffee, their average daily sugar levels rose 8 percent compared to days when the same people were given four placebo tablets, the researchers reported in the journal Diabetes Care. “What we are really showing here is that when people with type-2 diabetes who are regular coffee drinkers drink coffee, it produces an elevation Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Review The Effect Of Acute Caffeine Intake On Insulin Sensitivity And Glycemic Control In People With Diabetes

Review The Effect Of Acute Caffeine Intake On Insulin Sensitivity And Glycemic Control In People With Diabetes

Abstract The prevalence of diabetes is growing globally, and with no current cure for the disease, management is focused on optimizing blood glucose control to limit complications. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of caffeine intake on blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Electronic searches were completed using Pub Med, CINAHL, and Web of Science using the search terms “coffee and insulin,” “caffeine and insulin,” “caffeine and diabetes,” “caffeine and type 1 diabetes,” “caffeine and type 2 diabetes,” and “caffeine and glycemia.” Seven trials were found to meet the search criteria. Five of the 7 studies suggest caffeine intake increases blood glucose levels, and prolongs the period of high blood glucose levels. Future research should focus on larger clinical trials to confirm the relationship and mechanism of action related to caffeine intake and glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Caffeine For Diabetics

Caffeine For Diabetics

Coffee’s widely-reported potential anti-diabetes benefits may be related to the caffeine content of the beverage, claims a new study from Japan. Scientists from Nagoya University report that coffee prevented the development of high-blood sugar in lab mice, as well as improving their sensitivity to insulin, thereby reducing the risk of diabetes. “Our results indicated that caffeine is one of the most effective anti-diabetic compounds in coffee,” wrote the researchers in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. “We hope to identify the target tissues upon which coffee or caffeine acts directly, as well as effective anti-diabetic compounds other than caffeine. However, the present results suggest that coffee consumption may help to prevent type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome,” they added. The results are consistent with a growing body of research, much of which was pulled together in a meta-analysis in the Archives of Internal Medicine (Dec 2009, Vol. 169, pp. 2053-2063) by scientists from the University of Sydney, Australia. Data from over 500,000 individuals with over 21,000 cases of type-2 diabetes from prospective studies showed that drinking three to four coffee and tea may reduce the risk of developing diabetes by 25 percent. Benefits of the bean - Coffee, one of the world's largest traded commodities produced in more than 60 countries and generating more than $70bn in retail sales a year, continues to spawn research and interest with data linking it to improved liver health, in addition to the potential anti-diabetes benefits. Diabetes affects an estimated 24 million Americans, equal to 8 percent of the population. The total costs are thought to be as much as $174 billion, with $116 billion being direct costs from medication, according to 2005-20 Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

Tweet The effect of coffee on diabetes, when presented in the media can often be confusing. News stories can in the same week tout the benefits coffee can have on diabetes and shoot down coffee as being unhelpful for blood sugar levels. This doesn’t mean the articles are contradictory though. Put slightly more simply, coffee contains different chemicals, some of which have beneficial effects whereas others can have a less beneficial effect, such as caffeine which can impair insulin in the short term. Caffeine and blood sugar levels Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognised that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasised response by the body. Benefits of coffee Coffee has been shown to lower risks of the following conditions: Coffee contains polyphenols, which are a molecule that anti-oxidant properties which are widely believed to help prevent inflammatory illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, and anticarcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. As well as polyphenols, coffee contains the mineral magnesium and chromium. Greater magnesium intake has been linked with lower rates of type 2 diabetes. The blend of these nutrients can be helpful for improving insulin sensitivity, which may help to offset the opposite effects of caffeine. Coffee and prevention of diabetes Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumptio Continue reading >>

Coffee, Diabetes, And Weight Control1,2

Coffee, Diabetes, And Weight Control1,2

Abstract Several prospective epidemiologic studies over the past 4 y concluded that ingestion of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee can reduce the risk of diabetes. This finding is at odds with the results of trials in humans showing that glucose tolerance is reduced shortly after ingestion of caffeine or caffeinated coffee and suggesting that coffee consumption could increase the risk of diabetes. This review discusses epidemiologic and laboratory studies of the effects of coffee and its constituents, with a focus on diabetes risk. Weight loss may be an explanatory factor, because one prospective epidemiologic study found that consumption of coffee was followed by lower diabetes risk but only in participants who had lost weight. A second such study found that both caffeine and coffee intakes were modestly and inversely associated with weight gain. It is possible that caffeine and other constituents of coffee, such as chlorogenic acid and quinides, are involved in causing weight loss. Caffeine and caffeinated coffee have been shown to acutely increase blood pressure and thereby to pose a health threat to persons with cardiovascular disease risk. One short-term study found that ground decaffeinated coffee did not increase blood pressure. Decaffeinated coffee, therefore, may be the type of coffee that can safely help persons decrease diabetes risk. However, the ability of decaffeinated coffee to achieve these effects is based on a limited number of studies, and the underlying biological mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. INTRODUCTION Coffee consumption, which probably originated in northeast Africa, spread throughout the Middle East in the 15th century and thence to Europe (1). It is estimated that more than half of the US population now consumes coffee (2). Of the 2 Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study In Younger And Middle-aged U.s. Women.

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study In Younger And Middle-aged U.s. Women.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses' Health Study II aged 26-46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73-1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49-0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41-0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83-0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73-0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82-0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74-0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64-1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

type 2 diabetes -- but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, PhD, and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8% higher. And after every meal -- including dinner -- their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. (If you have diabetes, how much caffeine do you consume on a regular basis? Talk with others on WebMD's Type 2 Diabetes Support Group message board.) Several studies have found that coffee drinkers -- especially those who drink a lot of coffee -- have a lower risk of diabe Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

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