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Diabetes And Bruises

Easy Bruising, Fatigue And Weight Gain

Easy Bruising, Fatigue And Weight Gain

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms easy bruising, fatigue and weight gain including Medication reaction or side-effect, Diabetes, type 2, and Depression (Adult). There are 88 conditions associated with easy bruising, fatigue and weight gain. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Diabetes, type 2 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Depression (Adult) Depression is a painful sadness that interferes with daily life and includes hopelessness, anxiety, and more. Congestive heart failure People with congestive heart failure can have shortness of breath, fatigue, irregular heartbeat and more. Hypothyroidism (adult) Hypothyroidism your body functions slow down, making you gain weight and feel tired all the time. Multiple sclerosis Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the nervous system causing difficulties with balance, speech, and movement. Depression (Child and Adolescent) Depression is a painful sadness that interferes with a child's schoolwork, family life, and social activities. Pre-leukemia (myelodysplastic syndrome) Myelodysplastic syndromes are diseases that affect the bone marrow and blood, causing anemia and tiredness. Mononucleosis Mononucleosis is a viral infection causing extreme fatigue, sore throat, fever, rash, muscle aches, and more. Anemia Anemia, a lack of red blood cells, can cause fatigue, pale skin, weakness, Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Foot And Risk: How To Prevent Losing Your Leg

The Diabetic Foot And Risk: How To Prevent Losing Your Leg

Anyone who has ever had an elevated blood sugar level is at risk for foot complications. It may be as simple as knowing that once in your life, even during pregnancy, you have had an elevated blood sugar level. If so, you are at risk and must monitor your feet. Diet-controlled diabetics, whether diagnosed as an adult or as a child, have feet at risk of diabetic complications. The simple rule: If you have ever been told that you are at risk of developing diabetes, you need to consider your feet and work to prevent injury. It starts with daily foot checks: inspecting all sides, including the bottoms, which can be done best with someone's help or with a mirror. During a foot check, any changes in the foot's shape or color, sense of feeling/sensation, painful areas or skin integrity need to be evaluated. Any new bunions, calluses or corns need to be identified and shown to a medical doctor. The overall foot shape could change due to a bone fracture that would also need the attention of a physician. Stress fractures are very small breaks in the bone that will not usually change the shape of the foot, but may cause pain, bruising or swelling. The color of the foot is important as it helps show any changes in blood flow to the foot. Darkening or loss of hair may indicate that the blood or nerve supply has decreased. Less blood to the foot can mean slower healing of cuts and scrapes. Bruises indicate injuries. Especially important are the bruises or cuts found during a foot check that the person was not aware of at the time of injury. Any bruises within calluses are particularly important to show to a physician. To monitor sensation, a feather or facial tissue can be used to brush the foot and test its ability to feel light touch. It is also important to be sure the foot can se Continue reading >>

Does Anybody Else Bruise Really Easily?

Does Anybody Else Bruise Really Easily?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Not sure if it is related to diabetics or not. But I bruise really easily. Not only in injection sites. But I get huge dark bruises and I don't know where they came from. Mainly on my legs. Hi Tanny35, know a lady who had the bruise easily problem...tests showed she had low white blood cells....she eventually got better .....told to eat lots of bananas lol I bruised very easily all my life but not now. I eat an avocado a day. High in potassium but not sugar like a banana. Not sure if that's what changed it but the timing matches up. I had a full blood count recently so rules out any low white blood cells! But will try eating bananas and avocados They're just unsightly - esp in summer when u want to wear dresses! I'm at a wedding at the weekend and my bruises will ruin my dress lol! I keep asking my partner if he secretly kicks me in the night lol Not sure if it is related to diabetics or not. But I bruise really easily. Not only in injection sites. But I get huge dark bruises and I don't know where they came from. Mainly on my legs. I bruise super easy, and make the same joke about my partner kicking/pinching me in the night. Once I had a fairly large dog (probably 30-40 lbs) put his front paws on my legs while sitting down and I had a paw-print shaped bruise the next day I've never been told there's anything wrong with my blood cells either, but my mother (non-diabetic) also bruises incredibly easily, so that is likely genetics for me. Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Healing Bruised Fingers

6 Tips For Healing Bruised Fingers

We know that with each blood glucose (BG) check, you are making a proactive decision to proactively manage your diabetes and we applaud you for that! In doing so, we’ve heard feedback from our customers that this can also become painful and frustrating over time so we wanted to see what we could do to help. Frequent blood glucose (BG) testing is critical to good diabetes management, but sometimes it can leave your fingers bruised and sore. Good fingerstick techniques can help provide more accurate readings, reducing the number of times you have to redo that BG check. Here are 6 tips to help minimize sore black-and-blue fingers. 1. Change Your Lancet Often Although many people may reuse their lancets, they are likely to become dull over time, causing more pain with prolonged use. Be sure to change lancets with each fingerstick to ensure they’re sharp and clean. So make sure to carry extra lancets with you, and remember that you should never share yours or use another person’s lancing device. Use the lowest setting on the device that will obtain an adequate amount of blood. The more shallow the poke, the less it will hurt. It may take some experimentation to see which setting works best for you. You might also try experimenting to find the right lancet or lancing device for you, or change it out more frequently. 2. Wash Your Hands Before Testing Using alcohol, such as hand sanitizer, to clean your hands before testing can dry and toughen the skin over time, making it more difficult and painful to obtain a drop of blood. Additionally, if the alcohol does not dry completely, it can mix with your blood and cause an inaccurate reading. If possible, instead of using alcohol, wash your hands with warm soapy water. Washing with warm soapy water will help bring blood to the Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruising: Causes, Diabetes Connection & The Life-cycle Of A Bruise

Unexplained Bruising: Causes, Diabetes Connection & The Life-cycle Of A Bruise

A bruise is also known as a contusion. It is the result of blood from damaged blood cells that are deep beneath the skin and collect near the skin’s surface. But what does unexplained bruising mean? Unexplained bruising can be the result of numerous causes from aging and vitamin deficiencies to diabetes. Random bruising could be a sign of a health issue that should be checked out. Bruising for no reason can be explained and treated. But first, we need to look at the different types of bruises and what causes them. In this article: Types of Bruises There are two types of bruises that you should be aware of—ecchymosis and hematoma. 1. Ecchymosis This type of bruising is the one you are most familiar with. These bruises end up being a flat, purple-colored bruise. The bruise is caused when blood cells are damaged, and blood leaks into the top layers of the skin. 2. Hematoma A hematoma is what you might refer to as a “goose egg.” A lot of damaged blood cells collects and clots under the skin, raising it into a lump or bump. The area tends to be swollen and painful. A hematoma tends to be the result of a greater trauma than ecchymosis. Unexplained Bruising Causes What causes unexplained bruising? Now, you’ve read about what causes bruises, so it may seem a little odd that a bruise should suddenly form on its own. These unexplained bruises can be the result of many factors ranging from the simple effects of aging to the warning signs of disease. But, the simpler explanations may surprise you. Unknown bruising is acutally the result of certain factors that can cause you to bruise easier. 1. Vitamin Deficiency Vitamin deficiencies of various sorts can lead to unexplained bruises. For example, vitamin C is used by the body to strengthen blood vessels. A lack of vitamin Continue reading >>

Bruising?? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Bruising?? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am bruising very easily.. In fact I have more little bruises on my legs than my infant school child!!?? Is this a sign of something to do with my diabetes? I used to bruise on my thighs before I changed to a 4mm needle Oh right, apologies for assuming they were needle marks. In that case, it's something I've never heard before and you should let your nurse/doctor know. Nobody should bruise for no reason, however, some are more prone than others. Some meds will make bruising easier too, wolferin for example. That's odd then. Got no answer for you in that case I'm afraid! Think I read somewhere (could even have been on here!) that this is something to do with your liver not working as efficiently as it could. Before diagnosis I noticed that any bruises I had took ages to heal and the doctor suggested fatty liver. Now my diabetes is under control this doesn't appear to happen any more,in fact just out of hospital for an op and all my bruises are healing really well so there could be something in it. Hi, my mum bruises very easily - its got something to do with her red/white cells!!!!???? She is on Warfren daily for the rest of her life, it also has to be monitored extremely carefully by the hospital as the need for it in her body can fluctuate, if not monitored carefully it can kill, so im told. Its also used as a rat poison. It thins the blood out of clotting. So please ask your doctor about this. She's just been in hospital for 4 weeks (she is 75) with internal bleeding all due to clotting even though no signs of bruising were evident. Go and see him/her. Continue reading >>

Life With Diabetes: Blood And Bruises

Life With Diabetes: Blood And Bruises

Sometimes it feels like I am at war with my body. Blood and bruises. There is dried blood on the sleeves of my t-shirt and a small spot on the back of my underwear. Blood spurts to the surface of my calloused fingers 8 to 10 times a day and I lick it away. There is a bruise on the right side of my belly button and on the back side of my left arm that I noticed when I was at the gym. The bruises take a long time to fade, turning from blue to yellow. These markings are like tattoos. They are what’s visible of my invisible disease. I hate the sight of blood. Growing up in the woods of Vermont I saw a fair share of blood, such as when the hunters drove by our house with deer carcasses slung in the bed of their truck or when my dad beheaded a chicken for dinner. Blood terrified me then, and it still does now. A few weeks ago my youngest child got hurt at a birthday party at his cousin’s house. A soccer goal fell and cut his face, close to his eye, and we had to take him to the ER for stitches. When it was finally time to numb the area I stood by his bedside and held his hand while the doctor inserted a large needle into his face. The cut was red and deep, and I felt myself getting weak. I held tighter to my baby’s hand while he cried, and I tried to take deep breaths, but the next thing I knew I was lying on the floor. It felt like those terrible memories of waking up after a bad low blood sugar. The nurse was standing above me asking if I was OK. “I have Type 1 diabetes,” I said. “I need to test my sugar.” I was fine. My blood sugar was 95. It was the blood on my baby’s face that made me pass out. I felt like a failure. I wasn’t there when my child needed me, and even though I was relieved that it wasn’t a result of low blood sugar, I was angry with my p Continue reading >>

What Common Medications Cause Bleeding And Bruising In People With Diabetes

What Common Medications Cause Bleeding And Bruising In People With Diabetes

Diabetes may have an impact on your circulation, which makes it easier for your skin to get bruised. In fact, increased bruising on the legs is a possible symptom of diabetes. Learn what common medications can cause bleeding and bruising for people with diabetes. People with diabetes are more prone to get bruised and have superficial bleeding due to related circulatory disruptions. Some common prescriptions, over-the-counter medications and supplements can cause bleeding and bruising. Knowing more about these medications helps you make an educated choice with your diabetes health care team. Aspirin or ibuprofen might be recommended to manage pain and reduce inflammation. These OTC medications are blood-thinning and can boost your risk of bleeding and bruising. This risk is increased if you are taking a non-prescription medication, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, with an anticoagulant. Commonly prescribed anticoagulants include clipidogrel, warfarin and enoxaparin. People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease. Often anticoagulants are prescribed to patients with cardiovascular problems or a stroke. Talk to your health care team about possible contraindications when you are taking anticoagulants and your bleeding risk. Chemotherapy and steroids are often prescribed for patients with cancer. Both can worsen the symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to fluctuating blood sugar levels from dehydration. This can also put patients at higher risk of bruising. Steroids may also be prescribed for other health conditions, including skin rashes. They may cause a patient’s blood sugar to rise and should be carefully monitored by your health care team. If you have unexplained bruises, report it. Never stop taking prescription medication until you consult with your Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruises

Unexplained Bruises

Alice, I seem to be having a lot of unexplained bruises, especially on my arms. My husband is worried that it could be a symptom of diabetes, which runs in my family. Does bruising have anything to do with diabetes? — Black and blue Dear Black and blue, There are many reasons why bruises may unexpectedly appear; however, diabetes is an unlikely suspect. The connection between "bruising" and diabetes that your husband may be referring to is a condition called acanthosis nigricans, where patches of brown to black skin accumulate in the folds and creases of their bodies — usually in the armpits and neck. This hyper-pigmentation happens because insulin "spills over" into the skin due to insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes. Another connection is that sometimes bruises heal slower in people with diabetes; however, this wouldn't explain why you are noticing more bruises in the first place. If you are worried about diabetes, there are more telling warning signs that are associated with the condition. For example, increased thirst and urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, and frequent infections may result from a high blood-sugar level. Unlike acanthosis nigricans, bruises are caused by leakage of blood after an injury. The list of usual suspects includes bumping into bedposts or other objects and not remembering, rigorous exercising (which can cause tiny tears in blood vessels, particularly in athletes and weightlifters), and old age. Some people, especially women, are more prone to bruising than others, so one possible explanation may be that you are less likely to notice the injury that triggered the bruising. Moreover, as people grow older and continue to expose themselves to the damaging effects of the sun, the skin becomes more Continue reading >>

Heres What You Should Know About Diabetes And Slow-healing Wounds

Heres What You Should Know About Diabetes And Slow-healing Wounds

Heres What You Should Know About Diabetes and Slow-Healing Wounds One summer day a few years ago, Saugerties resident Kathy Mellert, 64, set off for a bike ride. I hadnt been on a bike for a while, and I fell; my left shin hit the pedal. When her bruise became radically inflamed and very painful with a large hematoma, Mellert, a retired RN diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when she was 8 years old, knew she needed immediate medical attention. After consulting her primary care physician, she was referred to the Wound Healing Center at HealthAlliance Hospital: Broadway Campus in Kingston, a member of Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), where she saw infectious-disease specialist Charles Kutler, MD, the Centers Medical Director. I was really impressed by the up-to-date treatment and attentive care I received there, Mellert says. Upon examining her leg, Dr. Kutler told her he needed to open up her wound, performing a drainage procedure to release pressure built up under the skin. Mellerts wound healed successfully, following several months under Dr. Kutlers care and a treatment plan that included wound evaluation, vacuum and advanced-care dressings, compression, bioengineered grafts and antibiotics. A year later, Mellert slipped onsome rocks while walking into the ocean in Maine, causing her to sustain an even more serious wound. She again sought immediate medical attention from Dr. Kutler. This second wound also healed successfully. Diabetes is one of the major contributors to chronic wound-healing problems, says Dr. Kutler. When diabetic patients develop an ulcer, they become a high risk for major complications. November is National Diabetes Month, which calls attention to the growing effects of diabetes, a group of diseases that impair the bodys ability Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruising Have You Feeling Blue? Here Are Six Possible Reasons Why You Have Them

Unexplained Bruising Have You Feeling Blue? Here Are Six Possible Reasons Why You Have Them

Unexplained Bruising Have You Feeling Blue? Here Are Six Possible Reasons Why You Have Them You wake up with a faint trail of bruises down your leg. Depending on what you were up to the day before, a few possibilities race through your mind. Did I whack my leg on something while I was at the gym? Did I fall down at the bar? Did I just have a run-in with my bedpost? Mysterious bruises plague many of us, and they can be disconcerting. Most of the time, we just forget minor bumps and injuries that can cause bruises, leaving us confused when we start turning purple. In rare cases, though, sudden and unexplained bruising can be a symptom of something more serious than a forgotten clumsy moment. Here are six possible reasons for unexplained bruising, ranging from the easily remedied to some concerning problems. Certain vitamins have a role in making blood, clotting cuts, and healing wounds. Minor deficiencies of these vitamins may not cause any symptoms, but if the shortage is allowed to progress, a multitude of symptoms can arise, including bruising. Vitamin B12 works with folate to make the DNA of red blood cells.A deficiency can cause bruises to appear more easily than usual. Vitamin K is important for clotting, and a lack of it can lead to leaky blood vessels, which in turn could be responsible for mysterious bruises. Lastly, Vitamin C is responsible for synthesizing collagen and other proteins that make skin and blood vessels. Unsurprisingly, a lack of it makes blood vessels weak and more susceptible to breakage, aka bruising. Introducing more vitamin-rich foods to your diet or taking a multivitamin can help clear up nutritional deficiency, and any annoying bruises it may have caused. Unfortunately, aging is an inescapable cause of bruising. Aging skin may appear thinne Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruising On Legs

Unexplained Bruising On Legs

A fall or bump may cause blood vessels to rupture under the skin which often leads to the development of bruises. It usually occurs because the blood from the vessels leaks into the tissues under the skin giving it the black and blue color which is characteristic of bruises. They may change color and become reddish blue, yellowish green or purplish-black as they gradually heal within 2 to 4 weeks. Sometimes the bruises spread in the direction of gravity, i.e., towards the lower half of the body. Thus, a bruise on the face or shoulder heals faster than a bruise on the leg. Bruises usually take a day or two to appear. However, if a person experiences swelling, bruising and pain within 30 minutes of the injury, then it may be indicative of a more serious problem. Unexplained Bruising on the Legs Bruising one’s legs while playing or due to an injury are quite common and is not considered to be a severe or life-threatening situation. However, if people frequently notice bruises on their legs and do not remember when the injury had taken place, it could be due to an underlying ailment. These bruises take a very long time to heal after they appear. Unexplained bruising is commonly a result of diseases that disrupt the circulation of blood in the body. Causes Of Unexplained Bruising On Legs Aging – Bruises known as actinic purpura are found at the back of the arms and hands in older people. It happens when blood vessels become weak due to repeated exposure to the sun. They first appear as flat red blotches and change color to purple, become deeper before they gradually fade away. The condition can worsen under the influence of alcohol, aspirin, Coumadin, etc. Thrombophilia – Thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura and idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura are bleeding disorders Continue reading >>

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores, Wounds Or Bruises Diabetes sores, wounds and bruises are very common skin changes for a diabetic with type 2 diabetes symptoms. A side-effect of high blood sugar is the reduced ability of your skin to heal properly. You may find that cuts and sores are slow to heal and may become more easily infected. This is due to poor circulation, nerve damage and an impaired immune system. Your skin is your body’s largest organ and is vulnerable to the effects of elevated blood sugar. It is important to recognize that the condition of your skin and the reduced ability to heal can be an indicator for diabetes sores or wounds problems, caused by type 2 symptoms of diabetes. As many as a third of people with type 2 diabetes will have a skin condition related to their disease at some time in their lives. The most common cause of bacterial skin infections in diabetics is the Staphylococcus bacteria, or staph infection. Another common cause is that diabetes affects the flow of the blood. Without proper blood flow, it takes longer for any wound, cut, sore, blister or bruise to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease and puts diabetics at risk not only for frequent healing wounds but also for infections. Skin infections left untreated can fester and worsen to the point that gangrene can develop. This is why you sometimes hear of diabetics having a toe, foot even part of a leg amputated. Research indicates that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper care when problems develop. A type 2 symptom of diabetes can start with something simple like a blister that becomes infected and develops into a sore. Checking your skin regularly is part of a good health care regime. Other type 2 diabetes symptoms, like nerv Continue reading >>

7 Tips To Stop Injection Site Bruising

7 Tips To Stop Injection Site Bruising

Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. In 2015, Insulin Nation will be featuring a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q: Is it common to get bruises at the site of injection? What can you do about that? A: There are many reasons that an injection site might develop a bruise. Try some of these techniques to decrease the chances of bruising: Ice the injection site for about 30 to 60 seconds prior to giving the injection.The cold helps to shrink away the capillary blood vessels which may get punctured during a shot. If the bruising happens specifically in your abdomen, make sure you are not injecting too close to your belly button. sponsor Shorter needles tend to cause more bruising than longer needles. If you are on blood thinners like warfarin, aspirin, or Plavix, you may be more at risk for bruising. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Make sure you are injecting at a 90 degree angle to your skin, and not on a slant. Always use a new needle or pen cap for insulin pens. Reusing needles causes more trauma to the tissue. Switch injection sites. Repeated injection into the same area can cause bruising, as well as the development of scar tissue. Have a Question? Insulin-Quiring Minds is a free service of the clinical team at Integrated Diabetes Services LLC. Submit your questions to [email protected] All questions will be answered, and yours may be chosen to appear in Insulin Nation. About Integrated Diabetes Services Integrated Diabetes Services provides one-on-one education and glucose regulation for people who use insulin. Diabetes “coaching” services are available in-person and Continue reading >>

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